low/no fat cheese?

General Cheese making discussion

low/no fat cheese?

Postby aris » Wed May 10, 2006 6:40 pm

Can you make low/no fat cheese? What happens if you put rennet in skim or semi-skim milk?
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Postby Wohoki » Wed May 10, 2006 6:45 pm

I just made a soft cheese just by straining home-made semi-skimmed yoghurt through a cheesecloth. Very tangy, but nice with a covering of black pepper and some olive oil, and it was made in 24 hours.
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Postby Rik vonTrense » Wed May 10, 2006 10:50 pm

If you make anything edible by separating the milk solids from the whey it is cheese.

Well done and enjoy it.



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Postby Oddley » Wed May 10, 2006 11:03 pm

Wohoki I used to make a lot of yogurt then strain it as you say. it used to make really good Greek style yogurt. It's surprising how creamy it is.
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Postby Michelle » Thu May 11, 2006 3:25 am

Oddley wrote:Wohoki I used to make a lot of yogurt then strain it as you say. it used to make really good Greek style yogurt. It's surprising how creamy it is.


Hi Oddley! How about sharing your method of making a greek style of yogurt?I always thought yogurt was just yogurt? Best wishes!

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Postby Rik vonTrense » Thu May 11, 2006 4:34 am

Michelle....

Greek Yoghurt is just the same as Fromage Frais and you have to have yoghurt before you can drain it into Greek style.

If anyone one wnats to know how to make yoghurt in the first place I will post the method for you.


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Postby jenny_haddow » Thu May 11, 2006 5:58 am

I usually buy a good quality greek yoghurt as a starter for my yoghurt. If I make it with ordinary plain I can certainly tell the difference.

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Postby Oddley » Thu May 11, 2006 9:05 am

jenny: I just used tesco ordinaire yogurt as a starter, I always get really good results with it.

Rik: if you would like to make a yogurt making thread I'm sure there are some that would find it most interesting. But in the cause of good manners I will answer Georgie.

Georgie: Yogurt is really simple stuff to make all you need is a natural yogurt and some milk. Simmer the milk for 4-5 mins let cool down to blood heat. Stir in a couple of tablespoons of the live yogurt, now set it in a warm place an airing cupboard for instance, for between 12-24 hours until it sets. To make Greek style, just strain the yogurt through a muslin bag until thick, rich and creamy.
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Postby Wohoki » Thu May 11, 2006 9:43 am

I'd just add that I ferment my yogurt in a fan oven set for 45C, and it's done in about 10 hours. I use the Yeo Valley stuff as a starter.

When I make Greek yogurt, if it's too sharp, I fold in no more than 25% whipped cream.

And the cheese I made was just yogurt made from organic milk strained as per Greek style, and then some more. I stirred in about 1% salt when it was nice and thick, then pressed it under a 2kg weight until it stopped dripping, formed it into a log in foil twisted in a tea-towel, then rolled the log in cracked black pepper. It WAS very good :D
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Postby Rik vonTrense » Thu May 11, 2006 10:51 am

They also roll the cheese logs in wood ash ...............!!!!


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Postby aris » Thu May 11, 2006 4:33 pm

What you know as "greek style" is just yoghurt which has been strained to remove excess liquid. Obviously to get the same flavour as the brands you get in the supermarket - like Total - requires the right ingredients and cultures.
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Postby Oddley » Thu May 11, 2006 4:45 pm

aris, that is how the Greeks make their yogurt just by straining ordinary yogurt. The reason I called it "Greek style" is you won't get it exactly the same as the original because of the environmental conditions.

On the other hand the Greek style yogurt I make is quite nice. so I am happy to make it.

Last edited by Oddley on Thu May 11, 2006 4:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Wohoki » Thu May 11, 2006 4:45 pm

In Greece they just strain yogurt to raise the solids content.

What I know as Greek yogurt is the yogurt eaten in Greece, where I asked for a technique.
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Postby Wohoki » Thu May 11, 2006 4:46 pm

Oddley beat me to it.

And RvT, I have eaten goats cheeses rolled in ashes many times: I will give it a go next time, as we have a wood fire and the residue from my smoker is pure fruit-wood ash. (PM me if you want some.)
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Postby aris » Thu May 11, 2006 4:56 pm

As you may have guessed from my name - i'm of Greek descent ;-)

In Greece you get 'Yohurt' and 'Strained yoghurt'. Here in the UK, we know strained yoghurt as 'Greek style'. It's two different styles. If Greeks want strained youghurt they strain it - or nowadays, buy it already strained.

The 'Total' brand you here here in the UK is very good - it's actually imported from Greece and is one of the most popular brands there.
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