Country Ham

Air dried cured meat and salami recipes

Country Ham

Postby NCPaul » Sat Nov 24, 2018 11:58 am

Country Ham

There are a number of good resources out there to help in making a country ham, these are a few I liked.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=qcwu6K4crHc

https://pubs.ext.vt.edu/458/458-223/458-223.html

https://www.amazon.com/Country-Ham-Sout ... ountry+ham

It is possible, because it is a whole muscle, to cure a country ham with salt only. I preferred to use cure # 2. The legal requirements for a country ham are that the ham has over 4 % salt and that it loses 18 % weight. With such a large amount of salt, sugar is usually added at 1/4 the amount of salt. The hams are usually smoked though the process can vary widely. The bulk of the hams are sent to market sliced after 6 months. Increasingly more country hams are being held for longer aging to allow for additional flavor development. The number of ham producers has been declining; some have retired and simply not been replaced.

https://www.stevecoomes.com/2018/08/23/ ... bluegrass/

Here is what I did to make a country ham:

Pork leg with trotter removed and aitch bone attached 28 #
Salt 168 g
Sugar 49 g
Cure #2 31 g

Rub the cure in the face and hock end (not all of the salt will stick). Wrap the ham in unwaxed paper and put the package in a ham stocking hock down. Hold the ham at 50 F for 2 weeks. No attempt to control the humidity was made. At this point, add

Salt 196 g
Sugar 49 g

Wrap in fresh paper and hold at 50 F for two weeks. At this point, add

Salt 196 g
Sugar 49 g

Wrap in fresh paper and hold at 50 F for two weeks. The third cure treatment had some portion of salt not adsorbed, the excess was brushed off. After two more additional weeks, I cold smoked the ham overnight for 12 hours using corn cob pellets. After 2 more months, I cold smoked the ham overnight for 12 hours using corn cob pellets. After 1 more month, I gave it its last cold smoking. The weight loss was 19 %. The ham had a beautiful copper color and an intense smoke smell. The ham was aged in a fridge at 50-55 F for a total of 18 months with a weight loss of 28.2 %.

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After trimming out the aitch bone:

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Wedge cut out and trimmed:

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Sliced:

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Fashionably late will be stylishly hungry.
NCPaul
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Re: Country Ham

Postby Shuswap » Sat Nov 24, 2018 2:58 pm

Now that is patience
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Re: Country Ham

Postby Snags » Fri Nov 30, 2018 3:08 am

Would this be what is considered a Xmas Ham ?
yet to take the plunge still researching
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Re: Country Ham

Postby NCPaul » Sat Dec 01, 2018 5:31 pm

It is for me. :D
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Re: Country Ham

Postby SteveW » Sat Dec 01, 2018 7:12 pm

Do you need to cook it or eat as is?
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Re: Country Ham

Postby NCPaul » Sun Dec 02, 2018 1:41 am

I've had it both ways for dinner tonight. :D It is different from the hams of Europe but quality meat and time has made it special.
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Re: Country Ham

Postby mr_magicfingers » Sun Dec 02, 2018 11:10 am

That looks delicious.
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