Green spots around my white mold on salami/chorizo - Photos!

Air dried cured Meat Techniques

Re: Green spots around my white mold on salami/chorizo - Pho

Postby wheels » Tue Jun 19, 2018 2:59 pm

It looks tasty.

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Re: Green spots around my white mold on salami/chorizo - Pho

Postby ttx450 » Wed Jun 20, 2018 12:32 am

well?

grisell wrote:I'm very sorry: This doesn't look good at all. You may wash away the mould for the present, but it will return. The mould has already infected the meat. I wouldn't eat it.

Throw it away is my advice. And clean the chamber thoroughly with a chlorinated detergent. You don't want that thing back. :(

Sorry - shit happens.
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Re: Green spots around my white mold on salami/chorizo - Pho

Postby ttx450 » Sat Feb 16, 2019 6:05 pm

hi.. just wanted to update. Back when I made this I was asking if this could be froze and did not get much of reply's. Well went ahead and froze it. Now it has been frozen around 6 months and is still nice. Texture was not much difference. It's all gone now, finished eating it up over the holidays.

ttx450 wrote:well this is all I get out of 3kg.. will not last long.


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Re: Green spots around my white mold on salami/chorizo - Pho

Postby vagreys » Sat Feb 16, 2019 11:47 pm

Looks like with a little luck you had a good experience with wild inoculation. With wild inoculation, there is always a higher risk that the cure will go sideways or down the tubes. Opinion on this batch was mixed with some telling you to bin it, and some thinking it looked ok (I thought it looked ok and have seen much worse).
ttx450 wrote:thanks.. seems to have turned out very good, melts in your mouth. Would you wash mold off? Its kind of dry and crusty feeling.

Some molds produce ammonia as a byproduct, or other off flavors on the surface. It's generally a good idea to wash it off, and won't affect the flavor of the meat, but may improve the aroma and flavor of the bite.
ttx450 wrote:thanks...A lot of people still ferment wine with wild yeast.

And speaking as a certified brew judge, a lot of people produce really crappy wine and beer with wild yeast and bacteria. Some are even proud of the horror they've created. Depending on where you are and what molds and bacteria are in the area, you can end up with great product or crappy, even dangerous product. Bakers deal with this all the time and even capture and cultivate wild sourdough cultures for great bread. Belgian ales depend on wild yeast and bacteria. Great ciders depend on wild yeast and bacteria on the fruit skins. But let's say you live in an area with a lot of hardwood trees and leaf litter. You could easily end up with dangerous, toxic mould inoculating your product given less fortunate weather. Inoculating with a known good culture, whether bought or captured and cultivated, helps ensure you get the product you want and not the luck of the draw.
ttx450 wrote:coppa - well the mold went from white (after wash) pictures above to gray green in one day yesterday. It is fully covered this time after washing it. Good bad?

The mould just matured a little further into its life cycle. I've seen pictures of a curing cave in Liguria that has been used for several hundred years, and the walls and all of the meat was covered in sage gray-green mould, and the products are highly regarded. Color doesn't always indicate good or bad. Remember that by the time mould is visible at the surface, it is long and deeply established below the surface of the meat. If your product looks or feels really slimy, throw it out. If you see any, and I mean any black or red mould, even tiny pin points, throw it out. Washing the surface won't save it.
ttx450 wrote:I just did not have any culture and wanted to try it. I seen many individuals online that were making it w/o a starter culture...

And sometimes they get lucky and sometimes they don't. In your case, it came out fine and you had a good experience, but it could just as easily have gone badly, because you weren't in control. If not being in control appeals (and I understand how it could), be prepared to throw more out when it doesn't go well. Inoculating with a known culture helps you maintain control over the process, flavor and outcome of your efforts.
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Re: Green spots around my white mold on salami/chorizo - Pho

Postby wheels » Sun Feb 17, 2019 12:42 am

Wow, that's the post of the year. ttx450, I wish I could have said this - Tom has told you for nothing what could take a lifetime to learn.

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Re: Green spots around my white mold on salami/chorizo - Pho

Postby ttx450 » Wed Feb 20, 2019 10:27 pm

thanks, next time I will purchase good bacteria... I dont make wine with wild bacteria, had to much bad wine in my days. many people still make it that way.


vagreys wrote:Looks like with a little luck you had a good experience with wild inoculation. With wild inoculation, there is always a higher risk that the cure will go sideways or down the tubes. Opinion on this batch was mixed with some telling you to bin it, and some thinking it looked ok (I thought it looked ok and have seen much worse).
ttx450 wrote:thanks.. seems to have turned out very good, melts in your mouth. Would you wash mold off? Its kind of dry and crusty feeling.

Some molds produce ammonia as a byproduct, or other off flavors on the surface. It's generally a good idea to wash it off, and won't affect the flavor of the meat, but may improve the aroma and flavor of the bite.
ttx450 wrote:thanks...A lot of people still ferment wine with wild yeast.

And speaking as a certified brew judge, a lot of people produce really crappy wine and beer with wild yeast and bacteria. Some are even proud of the horror they've created. Depending on where you are and what molds and bacteria are in the area, you can end up with great product or crappy, even dangerous product. Bakers deal with this all the time and even capture and cultivate wild sourdough cultures for great bread. Belgian ales depend on wild yeast and bacteria. Great ciders depend on wild yeast and bacteria on the fruit skins. But let's say you live in an area with a lot of hardwood trees and leaf litter. You could easily end up with dangerous, toxic mould inoculating your product given less fortunate weather. Inoculating with a known good culture, whether bought or captured and cultivated, helps ensure you get the product you want and not the luck of the draw.
ttx450 wrote:coppa - well the mold went from white (after wash) pictures above to gray green in one day yesterday. It is fully covered this time after washing it. Good bad?

The mould just matured a little further into its life cycle. I've seen pictures of a curing cave in Liguria that has been used for several hundred years, and the walls and all of the meat was covered in sage gray-green mould, and the products are highly regarded. Color doesn't always indicate good or bad. Remember that by the time mould is visible at the surface, it is long and deeply established below the surface of the meat. If your product looks or feels really slimy, throw it out. If you see any, and I mean any black or red mould, even tiny pin points, throw it out. Washing the surface won't save it.
ttx450 wrote:I just did not have any culture and wanted to try it. I seen many individuals online that were making it w/o a starter culture...

And sometimes they get lucky and sometimes they don't. In your case, it came out fine and you had a good experience, but it could just as easily have gone badly, because you weren't in control. If not being in control appeals (and I understand how it could), be prepared to throw more out when it doesn't go well. Inoculating with a known culture helps you maintain control over the process, flavor and outcome of your efforts.
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Re: Green spots around my white mold on salami/chorizo - Pho

Postby ttx450 » Wed Feb 20, 2019 10:28 pm

thanks... now off to finish some breakfast and polish sausage.

wheels wrote:Wow, that's the post of the year. ttx450, I wish I could have said this - Tom has told you for nothing what could take a lifetime to learn.

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