Green spots around my white mold on salami/chorizo - Photos!

Air dried cured Meat Techniques

Postby rowang » Wed Dec 07, 2011 1:14 pm

I am battling with conflicting sources..

I think I will def try your method of innoculating next time, seems a good idea!

I have been reading around though, and saw this..

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?/to ... -sausages/

The greeny specks in the middle of the patches are very "fruiting body like". I have had previous adventures into mycology and growing mushrooms.

The white mold is pretty much all over in a very thin misty layer, but then thicker and white on the parts with green bits. Its very powdery/chalky, with no fuzzy or spindly bits.

I wish i had taken photos this morning... but at work so will have to wait till i get back :)!
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Postby grisell » Wed Dec 07, 2011 1:21 pm

Well, as I said, I wouldn't take the risk with anything that has any coloured spots. I definitely wouldn't eat those greenish ones on the first picture or the picture from the shop...
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Postby rowang » Wed Dec 07, 2011 1:24 pm

Neither would I :) !

Il upload photos later..
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Postby wheels » Wed Dec 07, 2011 3:44 pm

JollyJohn wrote:I ALWAYS sterilise my curing cabinet with a dilute bleach solution, before every new batch of sausage.


Why? Most of us try to build up a 'good mould' environment.

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Postby grisell » Wed Dec 07, 2011 4:01 pm

wheels wrote:
JollyJohn wrote:I ALWAYS sterilise my curing cabinet with a dilute bleach solution, before every new batch of sausage.


Why? Most of us try to build up a 'good mould' environment.

Phil


...provided that there is good mould there to begin with. :wink:
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Postby rowang » Wed Dec 07, 2011 5:41 pm

Photo!

As you can see, its fairly bright white mold. The red circle shows the small spot of green. The photo isnt the best..

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/607/photo1ur.jpg/

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/32/photocqf.jpg/


As for sterilising the cupboard each time, il have to.. my fridge is being shared between different hobbies - ie. cheesemaking and beer brewing.. There is going to be a beer in there once this lot of sausage is done!![/img]
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Postby manfran » Wed Dec 07, 2011 6:17 pm

The chances are, what you have is just a penicillin mould. Which kind? who knows, but it probably won't do much harm to you.
https://sites.google.com/site/windintheroses/mold has some good descriptions of moulds.

Tbh, I have just found a few blue specs of mould on my current batch of salamis, and I am not too pleased about it. I thought that I had innoculated thoroughly with mould from a shop bought salami.

However, these things happen, right? Wash it off with a little vinegar solution if you're worried...otherwise, look forward to the day they leave your drying chamber!
:) Francis
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Postby wheels » Wed Dec 07, 2011 6:37 pm

Officially, I guess that I ought to advise you along these lines:

grisell wrote:Well, as I said, I wouldn't take the risk with anything that has any coloured spots...


In reality, I'd just wipe the tiny green bit off with a cloth soaked in vinegar.

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Postby rowang » Wed Dec 07, 2011 6:59 pm

Im going to hold off doing even that for a day or 2.. Reason being, if the green bit grows, its mold. If it stays the same, its a fruiting body and is just generating (hopefully) good mold..

Fingers crossed!
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Postby JollyJohn » Wed Dec 07, 2011 9:40 pm

wheels wrote:
JollyJohn wrote:I ALWAYS sterilise my curing cabinet with a dilute bleach solution, before every new batch of sausage.


Why? Most of us try to build up a 'good mould' environment.

Phil


Phil, because I have only just got my cabinet under perfect (well, pretty much)control. The next batch will be sprayed with a salami mould culture, and after that I may well leave the cabinet unsterilised.

Just a thought, how come green mould is OK, in/on cheese?

John.
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Postby grisell » Wed Dec 07, 2011 10:28 pm

JollyJohn wrote:[---]
Just a thought, how come green mould is OK, in/on cheese?

John.


Because that's a controlled benign mould of a certain cheese mould strain, e.g. Penicillium roqueforti. Cheeses are inoculated in much the same way as salamis. I doubt that any mould cheese is produced today without inoculation.
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Postby rowang » Wed Dec 07, 2011 10:29 pm

Oh i can do that one.. Its ok, because its a specialised strain, usually penicillium rocqueforti - which oxidises that colour. The oxidation is achieved by pricking the cheese with a sterilised needle to allow oxidation.
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Postby grisell » Wed Dec 07, 2011 10:34 pm

manfran wrote:[---]
Tbh, I have just found a few blue specs of mould on my current batch of salamis, and I am not too pleased about it. I thought that I had innoculated thoroughly with mould from a shop bought salami.
[---]


Even if you inoculate, you can get a local malign mould infection, but the risk of it spreading is very small. These small spots tend to form around specks of dirt that have stuck to the casings.

These small spots I just wash off with a brush with vinegar. What worries me is if the whole product is infected, and without inoculation, the risk is that all the mould is malign.
André

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Postby grisell » Wed Dec 07, 2011 10:52 pm

rowang wrote:Photo!

As you can see, its fairly bright white mold. The red circle shows the small spot of green. The photo isnt the best..

[---]


To me, it looks like wild mould. Salami mould as I know it, doesn't grow in a patch-like way but evenly over the product and never produces coloured spots.

We had an identical discussion, with very similar pictures, on the forum a few months ago. As I remember it, some said it was okay and others not. Let me be clear. I don't assert that your sausages are poisonous. However, based on the fact that you didn't inoculate, I assert that there is a substantial statistical risk that they are hazardous to health, and as such, I personally wouldn't risk eating them.

"Re-inoculation" at this stage would be futile. When it comes to mould inoculation, the principle of first to the mill rules.
André

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Postby wheels » Thu Dec 08, 2011 12:05 am

André is technically correct. There's no way I can argue against his logic.

(I'd still do what I said though!)

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