Bath Chaps

Air dried cured meat and salami recipes

Bath Chaps

Postby Oddley » Fri Aug 19, 2005 9:49 am

As you may know a couple of weeks ago, I went to Smithfield and bought two pigs heads, �4 for the two was quite cheap. I made crispy pigs ears, Brawn and this is the last product 2 bath Chaps.

The method for making these is quite simple, following the line of the mouth, I separated the lower jaw from the pigs head. I then steeped the two lower jaws in English Brine for 14 days.


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After 14 days, I removed the jowl from the brine. You can see the jaw bone still in place, you can even see the teeth.

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I then simmered the two jowl's, for 2 1/2 hours in a vegetable stock. I then removed any bones, when slightly cooled I vacuum packed them, you could mould them into shape and press them until cold. I then put them in the fridge

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Finally the end result. This is quite a nice ham not for the diet conscious. But goes great in a sandwich. the only tip I can give, is make sure the stock you simmer them in, is a really nice tasting one, because the flavour of it does come through.

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Last edited by Oddley on Thu Aug 21, 2008 10:52 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby Platypus » Fri Aug 19, 2005 10:02 am

I've never eaten bath chaps, but those look really good.
Well they do when the teeth are removed.
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Postby aris » Fri Aug 19, 2005 10:44 am

That looks good indeed. You must have a very tolerant wife!
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Postby Oddley » Fri Aug 19, 2005 10:49 am

Yes she is great!
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Postby Spuddy » Sat Oct 01, 2005 10:47 am

What did you do with the brain Oddley?
I have a head in the freezer at the moment and was going to make a brawn with it but I can't decide what to do (if anything at all) with the brain.
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Postby Oddley » Sat Oct 01, 2005 3:00 pm

Spuddy, I can highly recommend the fomage de tete (Brawn) Recipe I made. It's posted HERE

I've sent you a PM about the brains.
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Postby Spuddy » Sat Oct 01, 2005 4:47 pm

Thanks mate. I'll try it.
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Postby Rustum Longpig » Sat Oct 08, 2005 8:05 am

I tried something similar with bath chaps and what I did was, after cooking I rolled them tightly in cling film with some caul fat laid out on it and screwed them tight into a cylinder for easy slicing and presentation when cold, or coating with a peppery crust and shallow frying. Great with black pudding in a sort of stack with some apple fritters and picalilly!!!

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Postby somerset lad » Sun Oct 09, 2005 9:27 pm

I too make Bath chaps Oddley, and down here they are rolled in breadcrumbs and eaten with piccalilli. Lovely. I say i make out of a pigs head, a chap, some brawn, pressed tongue, steamed brains, a few sausages, crispy pigs ears and if the pig is hairy, an oil painting brush as well. Nothing wasted. :lol: :lol: :lol:
good growing ,good eating ,good game , good life
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Postby Oddley » Sun Oct 09, 2005 10:52 pm

hi somerset lad

I do enjoy country food. Unfortunately I feel we city folk have lost our way a bit and are willing to accept what the supermarkets are willing to offer.

We British don't seem to be able to taste and describe our food and taste sensations. We British have a rich culinary history when at it's best is the equal to any other country in the world. but we seem determined to play it down.

It is through forums like this and HFW's that we can be proud of our food and boast of our success. I don't post on HFW's site because although I see there are a lot of really intelligent people on there they are dumming down there info to accommodate the majority. If the info is to tech then people either ignore it or take the piss. Being of an inquisitive nature I like to know the in's and out's of everything.

I have read your posts on HFW with interest and even noted some of your recipe's.

Everybody sorry I'm not as active as I was but for an old boy I'm very busy at the moment.
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Postby TJ Buffalo » Mon Oct 10, 2005 1:08 am

Hi Oddley & company
I was reading about the bath chaps with some interest and had a couple of questions:
Is the Bath part named after the city of Bath? And why are chaps called that?
What are the HFW forums? I assume you're not talkng about the harrison ford world or whatever else a search on 'hfw forums' brings up?
You mention 2 jowls, I guess that these are the right and left halves of the jawbone? Not to be stupid, but I've not really been big on pig anatomy, especially since I stopped makng silk purses from sow's ears. :D
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Postby Oddley » Mon Oct 10, 2005 1:32 am

Hi TJ Buffalo,

I believe the chap part of bath chaps comes from when in the cold weather ones cheeks would become red and swollen which would be described as chapped. The following links might help with clarity.


Eadles Bath Chaps are pigs cheeks taken from our own outdoor reared Landrace/Duroc Pigs. The pigs cheeks are cut off, pickled in Brine for 2-3 weeks, then soaked in fresh water over night then the next day put into a cooking bag and then boiled for 3-4 hrs. Leave to cool in the fridge, skin them off and roll in bread crumbs. Serve cold with salad or slice thinly and fry in butter for an usual delicacy. "Bath Chap" may originate from Bath although we are not sure. Some restaurants in London use Bath chaps.


http://www.britishfoodfortnight.co.uk/c ... nlast.html

http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/rc_somerset.htm

The forum we are mentioning is the Hugh fernly whittingstall forum. he is a celebrity chef who believes in self sufficiency and quality ingredients.

http://forum.rivercottage.net/index.php ... c4a0322085
.
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Postby Paul Kribs » Mon Oct 10, 2005 7:18 am

Nice to see you are about Oddley

I am an avid viewer of the cooking channel on sky tv, and recently saw a program where Anthony Bourdain (I think?) visited London and ate at a restaurant where all the old traditional cuts of pork were on offer. Steamed, boiled, stewed bits of this and that. I particularly recall half a roast pigs head being served. I really must start 'taping' some of these programs.

Regards, Paul Kribs
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Postby Erikht » Mon Oct 10, 2005 8:47 am

I believe it's called "discing" today.
100 years of freedom
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Postby Oddley » Mon Oct 10, 2005 11:43 am

Hi all,

I like too watch the food channels on sky as well. I have got a few good recipes off their internet site. I made Goan mackerel off the great food live site yesterday. It weren't bad. It had a cracking spice mix which i'm going to use in some sausages.
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