Tropical woods for smoking?

Postby Reaper » Thu Jan 05, 2006 2:27 am

I have been in south Florida and used Mangrove to grill lobsters, the flavor rivals Oak, I have friends that use this wood for smoking everything from mullet to pork, with excellent results.

Regards,

Reaper
Reaper
Registered Member
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2005 11:56 pm
Location: Roanoke, Virginia

Postby tristar » Thu Jan 05, 2006 4:57 am

Hi Folks,

Thanks for that David, I already have a number of modification details stored in the dark recesses of my mind for the conversion, your experience has shown that it can work, and work well by the sound's of it!


And thank you Reaper, I would never have thought of using Mangrove wood, there is an abundance of it in the coastal areas around Jakarta, it sounds as if it could be very versatile. I will add it to my list of suitable woods, which with a little research is steadily growing! I just can't wait to get back home and start experimenting!

Regards Richard
"Don't be shy, just give it a try!"
Food for The Body and The Soul
User avatar
tristar
Registered Member
 
Posts: 611
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2005 11:27 am
Location: Stavanger, Norway

Postby Reaper » Fri Jan 06, 2006 12:24 am

Richard,

My friend from south Florida has used: button wood (great for seafood), sapadilla, any citrus, mangrove, he says avacado burns like pine.

My friend gets a good hot bed of oak burning and puts green mangrove wood, roots and leaves on and lets it smoke away

I did a Google search (tropical wood for smoking) and came up with this,

http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/woods ... ppropriate

also try this URL for general info, http://www.barbecuen.com/

Reaper
Reaper
Registered Member
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2005 11:56 pm
Location: Roanoke, Virginia

Postby Epicurohn » Sun Jan 15, 2006 11:22 pm

I think I'll give the mangrove a test.

Tristar: Do keep in mind that I live in the tropics and I've smoked into a winter night at barely 10�C outside. If you live in colder climates you might have to take in consideration heat retention. Using heavier gauge sheet metal, snug seals, insulations, etc.

David
Epicurohn
Registered Member
 
Posts: 229
Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2005 10:47 pm
Location: Honduras

Postby tristar » Mon Jan 16, 2006 5:28 am

Hi David,

No problem with the temperature, I also live in the tropics. Jakarta temperatures don't really vary much from season to season, with daytime temps in the 28-32 degrees C range, and night time lows of about 25 degrees C. My biggest problem is the high humidity which although not affecting grilling or smoking, I think will make it difficult with making dried sausages or jerky!


Regards,

Richard
"Don't be shy, just give it a try!"
Food for The Body and The Soul
User avatar
tristar
Registered Member
 
Posts: 611
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2005 11:27 am
Location: Stavanger, Norway

Previous

Return to Smoking and Barbecuing

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest