Brine Tester

Recipes and techniques using brine.

Brine Tester

Postby unclejoes96 » Sat Jan 21, 2006 2:22 pm

I have just taken delivery of the brine tester as sold on this site, does anyone know what the calibration is on the side 0 to 25. The rest of the words are in German.

I was expecting it to be % salinity, if it is that scale, is that not too low for brine ?

I will of course phone sausagemaking.org on Monday, but can anyone help in the meantime ?
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Postby Hobbitfeet » Sat Jan 21, 2006 3:46 pm

What are the German words?
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Postby Paul Kribs » Sat Jan 21, 2006 4:03 pm

unclejoes96

Just had a search and it seems brine (and other liquids) can be measured a couple of ways.
One is using percentages (%) and the other is using Baum� (B�).
The range using B� is 0-25, whereas the percentage is used 0-100%.

It might pay to read this http://www.fao.org/docrep/003/x6555e/X6555E05.htm..

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Postby unclejoes96 » Sat Jan 21, 2006 4:19 pm

Paul ,

Many thanks, very useful link
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Postby unclejoes96 » Sat Jan 21, 2006 4:24 pm

Hobbitfeet,

The words as follows, are on calibration line on the stem

Wasser (water I presume)
Sol-E
Eisbein
Cassler
Kochsch
Dauer-L
Schiffs-P

Any ideas ?
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Postby Hobbitfeet » Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:57 am

Eisbein is a German salted pork hock, so it may indicate the level needed to produce such an item. I t is immersed in brine for about two weeks before being soaked in water and roasted. The other words you mention are German words certainly, but I can find no connection with brining. Sorry. Looks like you need a manual...any reference to the manufacturer?
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Postby Epicurohn » Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:51 pm

Paul,

I don't know Baume but when a brine (salinity) is being measured on the % scale it's maximum is 26%. At this point the solution is saturated and can't take any more salt. Another scale is Degrees of Saturation which goes from 0-100�S. 26% (260,000 mg/L) brine equals 100�S.

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Brine tester

Postby pibblemeister » Thu Apr 13, 2006 7:11 am

Last edited by pibblemeister on Fri Sep 14, 2007 1:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby georgebaker » Thu Apr 13, 2006 9:45 am

Hi

taken from Canninghandbook on electroplating (28th edition)

degree Baume= 144.3(1-1/sp.gr)

eg 1.15=18.8 Be

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