Recipe for Swiss St. Galler /Olma bratwurst?

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Recipe for Swiss St. Galler /Olma bratwurst?

Postby spatzle » Mon Jul 20, 2009 10:00 am

I've been looking for a recipe for a Swiss sausage called St. Galler (or Olma) bratwurst. This is a well known veal sausage in Switzerland that has been made for at least 400 years. But despite a healthy number of Swiss cookbooks in my pantry & Google, I'm finding it really hard to locate a recipe for this bratwurst. The closest I've found is an Americanized version on Len Poli's site. One of my searches found that a forum member, Griselda had translated a number of Swiss recipes to english. However, the link to those recipes no longer works. Has anyone run across a recipe for a St. Galler/Olma bratwurst?

I've outlined Len's recipe below if anyone would like to comment on ingredients or try it as is. The recipe looks good, but I'm trying to find one closer to the usual Swiss style. I believe that the Swiss version has a min. 40% veal & max. 20% pork & typically uses fresh milk instead of dry. Mace, lemon & pepper sound right & I've been told that it has some phosphate & bacon. I'm not sure if 'bacon' would mean a cured product or just refers to two different cuts of pork incorporated into the sausage. It's usually sold as a 165g (sometimes 115g or 230g) sausage in a wider casing. And a consistency similar to Munich weisswurst. I also see that Len's recipe has ginger, which I've never detected in the Swiss bratwurst.

63.00% veal
32.00% pork jowl
1.50% salt
1.25% milk, dry skim
0.85% sugar
0.42% mustard seed, ground
0.42% lemon zest
0.35% pepper, white, ground
0.10% ginger, powdered
0.06% mace, ground

26mm sheep casings
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Postby Oddley » Mon Jul 20, 2009 10:25 am

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Postby spatzle » Mon Jul 20, 2009 12:16 pm

Thank you very much for the links. There are quite a few recipes in there that I'll need to try.
In particular, the first link you provided has a recipe for St. Galler Veal Bratwurst, which is just what I was looking for.

In case it is of interest to anyone else:
St. Galler Veal Bratwurst
37% Veal
8% Pork
25% neck fat/lard
30% milk or ice water
100%

Spices (per kg of sausage)
19g salt
2g pepper
1.5g mace
0.5g lemon zest
1g Fluessigwuerze
1g Streuwuerze
10g fresh onions
1/2 egg (optional)
3g phosphate

30/32mm pork casing; make to approx. 140g
prepare quickly; add raw egg only at end
cook 20 - 25 min @ 75C
cool in water bath
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Postby wheels » Mon Jul 20, 2009 12:48 pm

Griselda kindly translated many of these recipes for us - I have copies of these if anyone wants any looking up.

Phil
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Postby Zulululu » Thu Jul 23, 2009 6:53 pm

1g Streuwuerze,1g Fluessigwuerze ?????Can anyone translate for me?
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Postby captain wassname » Thu Jul 23, 2009 7:37 pm

as far as I can make out the first one is a mixture that is scattered on soups and the second is literally liquid spice, I just Googled and clicked translate this page. I think your talking unspecifid spice mixes
wuerze means spice in german.

Jim
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Postby spatzle » Thu Jul 23, 2009 9:47 pm

I should have translated that better, these are popular Swiss seasonings. Streuwürze is a herbal (dry) seasoning & Flüssigwürze is a liquid condiment (seasoning sauce, e.g. for soups). These can be found in any Swiss supermarket and most Swiss homes. These are generic terms, not brand names so you should be able to use any brand that you can find. Which is just as well, as some of the brands are very hard to source outside of Switzerland. Some brands include Knorr Aromat & others by Maggi, Fondor, Mirador, etc.

The most common brand of Streuwürze would be Knorr Aromat. This is not too hard to find in N. America, you should be able to find it in most European themed supermarkets, larger German delis or through mail order. Although there is an Aromat intended for steaks (red tin), it might be too spicy for this sausage. So after thinking about this for a bit, I'd use the all purpose Aromat (yellow tin). It's sometimes seen in mainstream supermarkets too. It's a sweet seasoning salt, with a handful of savory herbs in it, as well as onion, pepper, garlic & MSG. It's an unusual melange if you didn't grow up with it.

Flüssigwürze is akin to a fermented soya sauce. I haven't looked for this outside of Switzerland, but at least one brand, Maggi Würze appears to be available through Amazon if you can't find it locally.

.
Last edited by spatzle on Fri Jul 24, 2009 12:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Method

Postby spatzle » Thu Jul 23, 2009 11:19 pm

I posted a better explanation of how I made this sausage in the recipe thread.
It's a pretty standard method for making an emulsified sausage.

.
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Postby Zulululu » Fri Jul 24, 2009 4:41 pm

Thanks I can get Aromat here it has a sort of yellow colour with green specks in it.
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