Rustic Andouille

Recipes for all sausages

Rustic Andouille

Postby gsevelle » Mon Oct 10, 2016 3:28 am

Image

OK, It is Sausage making time again, I just finished a batch of what I will call Rustic Cajun Andouille. I followed Emeril's Recipe but added 2 large onions and 1/2 cup of fresh garlic. I made a 5 lb. batch, I ground 3.5 lbs thourgh coarse plate and hand chopped 1.5 lbs. Used 32-35 mm hog casings and smoked with Pecan biscuits in the Bradley Smoker for 3 hours starting at 180 F. and ending at 230 F.

The final product has a nice color and feel and has a nice bit to it. Kinda what you would expect if you were in Louisiana. I intend to use the sausage in my Red Beans and Rice and Gumbo. :drool:
The smoke is rising and the butt is brining
gsevelle
Registered Member
 
Posts: 106
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2012 8:16 pm
Location: Mission Viejo, CA

Re: Rustic Andouille

Postby NCPaul » Mon Oct 10, 2016 10:54 am

What would you estimate the percent fat to be? Looks great, it would have a hard time getting past my breakfast plate. I'm testing two recipes myself for andouille this week. One is a modification of Big Guy's recipe (which is a modified version of John Folse's) and the other is a modification of Bruce Aidells' recipe. Are you happy with the level of heat?
Fashionably late will be stylishly hungry.
NCPaul
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2216
Joined: Thu Oct 01, 2009 12:58 am
Location: North Carolina

Re: Rustic Andouille

Postby gsevelle » Mon Oct 10, 2016 2:52 pm

NCPaul wrote:What would you estimate the percent fat to be? Looks great, it would have a hard time getting past my breakfast plate. I'm testing two recipes myself for andouille this week. One is a modification of Big Guy's recipe (which is a modified version of John Folse's) and the other is a modification of Bruce Aidells' recipe. Are you happy with the level of heat?


Hard to estimate the percentage of fat. I did us a well marbled pork shoulder (5 lbs) and cubed back fat (1 lb) I say fat is around 30% to 35% green weight. I like the level of heat, it has a quick bite but is not overwhelming. I did use smoked paprika which helps to drive a deeper flavor in the overall product.

Best of luck on your attempts. Let me know how they turn out.
The smoke is rising and the butt is brining
gsevelle
Registered Member
 
Posts: 106
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2012 8:16 pm
Location: Mission Viejo, CA

Re: Rustic Andouille

Postby wheels » Mon Oct 10, 2016 11:12 pm

US Andouille is not a sausage that's commonplace in the UK. We know that it's very different from the French variety, but would the two of you care to give us an idiot's guide and some basic recipes, please?

Phil
User avatar
wheels
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 12061
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 4:29 pm
Location: Leicestershire, UK

Re: Rustic Andouille

Postby gsevelle » Tue Oct 11, 2016 3:56 pm

Wheels,

Here is a good write up (first web link) and some typical Cajun Andouille recipe along with my observations and opinions.

On the Web:
http://honest-food.net/2012/03/21/andou ... jun-style/
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emer ... ecipe.html

Recipe Books:
Andouille Sausage, Great Sausage Recipes and Meat Curing (4th Edition); Rytek Kutas
Cold-Smoked Andouille and Hot-Smoked Andouille Charcuterie; Michael Ruhlman & Brian Polcyn

While I've not made the French variety this sausage has its roots in the original from France when in the late 1700's the French Creole settled in the southern area of what is now the United States and most often associated with Louisiana. This sausage is usually not eaten as a single piece of meat like a hot dog, brat, or banger but is normally added to casserole type dishes to provide seasoning and flavor. Most often it will be used as a protein in Red Beans and Rice, Gumbo and Jambalaya. One could compare these dishes to "paella" in that they are all rice dishes where one adds spices and protein. Typically these dishes were made by the slaves and laborer of the time who did not have access to the better cuts of meats but rather used game or unused portions of meats passed over by the gentry.

As with these types of recipes there are many renditions. Some of the basics though are:

* Pork is the current meat of choice with venison being used where people are still allowed to actually hunt there own foods.

* Spice profile varies however there is normally a grouping of sweet and savory herbs, paprika, and dried chili pepper (crushed or powdered)

* Fresh garlic and sautéed onions are add to some recipes to provide another layer of flavor

* The sausage is smoked, with Pecan wood being the preferred choice. This type of wood is abundant in the southern states so I'm guessing that it became the de facto choice.

* Overall flavor profile is from a mild to medium hot. The sausage should not be so hot that it takes over a dish it is added to but should be spicy enough to add flavor and depth.

This is making me hungry :drool:
The smoke is rising and the butt is brining
gsevelle
Registered Member
 
Posts: 106
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2012 8:16 pm
Location: Mission Viejo, CA

Re: Rustic Andouille

Postby wheels » Tue Oct 11, 2016 4:40 pm

Thanks for that. That's a most useful post.

It's a very different thing to the French variety:

Wikipedia wrote:Andouille in France
In France, particularly Brittany,[3] the traditional ingredients of andouille are primarily pig chitterlings, tripe, onions, wine, and seasoning. It is generally grey in color and has a distinctive odor. Also, a similar sausage is available called andouillette, literally "little andouille."


Thank goodness! :lol:

Phil
User avatar
wheels
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 12061
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 4:29 pm
Location: Leicestershire, UK

Re: Rustic Andouille

Postby NCPaul » Tue Oct 11, 2016 5:34 pm

to provide seasoning and flavor


I think this is the main point of this type of sausage. I've put eight recipes on a spreadsheet and the flavor profile for all showed salt, pepper, thyme, cayenne and garlic plus smoked flavor from cooking (often for long periods). They tend towards lean so as to not contribute grease to the dishes they are added to. Historically put into beef middles but now seen more often in large (40mm) hog casings. I'm cold smoking the ones I made now and they should be ready to taste this weekend; I'll put up my modified recipe then.
Fashionably late will be stylishly hungry.
NCPaul
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2216
Joined: Thu Oct 01, 2009 12:58 am
Location: North Carolina

Re: Rustic Andouille

Postby wheels » Tue Oct 11, 2016 6:09 pm

We've grown some borlotti beans, I think that this type of sausage will be just the thing to give them flavour.

Phil
User avatar
wheels
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 12061
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 4:29 pm
Location: Leicestershire, UK

Re: Rustic Andouille

Postby fusion555 » Tue Oct 11, 2016 8:58 pm

I came across this recipe for Andouille, cant remember where, iv looked at so many recipes these past few weeks, this one looked good and seems simple enough for a beginner like me so its in my keeper file.

Andouille Sausage Recipe

5# Pork (I prefer a Boston Butt) Trimmed of tough connective tissue and cut into 2 inch cubes.

Combine the following in a bowl:
2 tsp of Cayenne or to taste (Remember, if you make it too hot, every dish you make with
it will be too hot! Start off with a little, you can add more after you taste the finished seasoning)
1 Tbsp Paprika
1/4 Cup Chopped Fresh Garlic
1/8 Cup Fresh Ground Black Pepper
3 Tbsp Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt
1 Tbsp Fresh Thyme leaves, chopped
1 tsp Crushed Red Pepper
1 healthy pinch Cure #1 (1 tsp. of “cure” per 5# of meat)
1/2 Cup Ice Water

Toss this mixture with the meat, making sure it is well coated. Cover tightly with plastic
wrap and refrigerate for 1-2 days.
Chop half of the meat into 1/4 inch pieces and grind the other half with a coarse
grinding plate. Mix the two together with:1/8 Cup Non-Fat Powdered Milk (this is a binder)
Stuff the sausage into prepared Hog Casings (Beef middle casings if you can find them).
I smoked this in an inexpensive upright barrel smoker, with charcoal as the heat source,
and unsoaked Pecan chips for the smoke. The sausage was hung beneath the top rack, no water pan.
I smoked this at 130º F for 2 hours, then increased the heat to 165º F for another 2 1/2 hours,
refreshing the wood chips as needed. The trick here, is to get as much smoke flavor into the
sausage before it is actually cooked through, and too hot of a temperature will render the fat
out of your sausage. I controlled the temp by the number of coals, and keeping them piled up
and pushed to one side. When you spread your coals out the temperature will increase.
I added more coals to reach the 165º F mark.

The internal temperature of the sausage should read 155º F on an instant read thermometer.
Remove at this point and immediately spray with cold water. Hang at room temperature in
front of a fan for 1 hour then refrigerate overnight, uncovered.

Portion and store in vacuum sealed packages in the freezer.
fusion555
Registered Member
 
Posts: 108
Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2016 10:13 pm
Location: Northern California

Re: Rustic Andouille

Postby gsevelle » Tue Oct 11, 2016 9:09 pm

wheels wrote:We've grown some borlotti beans, I think that this type of sausage will be just the thing to give them flavour.

Phil


Here is a quick and easy Red Bean recipe that you can use. Normally we here in the states use a dried red kidney bean. You can either do this on the stove top or in a slow cooker, start in the morning, go off to work, come home, make white rice (20-30 minutes) and enjoy.

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/ ... ans-233901

This too is one of those dishes that every home has its own recipe I'll add a 13 oz can of tomato sauce or stewed tomatoes to mine when I do them but that's just how I do them. This is one of those dishes that I watched my mother make and I don't even use a written recipe for. You can also make a really good bean soup by just using a blender or immersion blender and fully cream the beans. That and some cornbread on a cold winter day while watching the football game (U.S. or the rest of the world, type) YUM!!! :drool:
The smoke is rising and the butt is brining
gsevelle
Registered Member
 
Posts: 106
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2012 8:16 pm
Location: Mission Viejo, CA

Re: Rustic Andouille

Postby gsevelle » Tue Oct 11, 2016 9:20 pm

NCPaul wrote:
to provide seasoning and flavor


I think this is the main point of this type of sausage. I've put eight recipes on a spreadsheet and the flavor profile for all showed salt, pepper, thyme, cayenne and garlic plus smoked flavor from cooking (often for long periods). They tend towards lean so as to not contribute grease to the dishes they are added to. Historically put into beef middles but now seen more often in large (40mm) hog casings. I'm cold smoking the ones I made now and they should be ready to taste this weekend; I'll put up my modified recipe then.



Interesting that you say they are lean sausage as most recipes include back fat, hum. I agree that I should have used a larger casing if I had them on hand but I had a bucket of the 35-39 on hand so that is what I used. The flavor should definitely come from wood smoke I've seen recipes that call for liquid and don't even bother to keep them.

Looking forward to seeing your recipe, pics, and taste review.
The smoke is rising and the butt is brining
gsevelle
Registered Member
 
Posts: 106
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2012 8:16 pm
Location: Mission Viejo, CA

Re: Rustic Andouille

Postby NCPaul » Tue Oct 11, 2016 10:27 pm

The recipe you gave is from here:

http://www.nolacuisine.com/2005/11/14/a ... ge-recipe/

The photo looks lean to me. I'm trying to get to something with a similar appearance.
Fashionably late will be stylishly hungry.
NCPaul
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2216
Joined: Thu Oct 01, 2009 12:58 am
Location: North Carolina

Re: Rustic Andouille

Postby fusion555 » Tue Oct 11, 2016 10:46 pm

NCPaul wrote:The recipe you gave is from here:

http://www.nolacuisine.com/2005/11/14/a ... ge-recipe/

The photo looks lean to me. I'm trying to get to something with a similar appearance.


Thats the one, now i remember
fusion555
Registered Member
 
Posts: 108
Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2016 10:13 pm
Location: Northern California

Re: Rustic Andouille

Postby KennethYale12 » Tue Oct 25, 2016 7:24 am

This looks tasty and delicious. I will surely make one during my break time. It is always fun to make your own food and you are sure of the freshness of its ingredients.
KennethYale12
Newly Registered
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2016 8:13 am

Re: Rustic Andouille

Postby gsevelle » Tue Oct 25, 2016 2:31 pm

KennethYale12 wrote:This looks tasty and delicious. I will surely make one during my break time. It is always fun to make your own food and you are sure of the freshness of its ingredients.


Welcome to the forum.

I hope you enjoy this forum as much as I do. One thing to note, is that it is an international forum (I did not realize that until I was deep into one of my first posts). These are great people who reflect food around the world and enjoy sharing. :D
The smoke is rising and the butt is brining
gsevelle
Registered Member
 
Posts: 106
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2012 8:16 pm
Location: Mission Viejo, CA


Return to Sausage Recipes

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest