Swedish Prinskorv

Recipes for all sausages

Swedish Prinskorv

Postby RichardAllen » Wed Dec 22, 2010 1:26 am

I had an excellent lunch today at a Swedish restaurant called Svea in Cheltenham (no connection other than as a customer).

I had a very tasty small frankfurter-type sausage called Prinskorv. I have found a number of recipes on the internet which mention it, but nothing on how to make it or what goes in it.

Any suggestions ?

reghards
Richard
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Postby tristar » Wed Dec 22, 2010 7:32 am

A recipe from a Swedish Website Roughly translated says:

The recipe I found on the sausage is as follows.

1 kg pork
2 tsp saltpeter
1/3kg lard
1 tsp white pepper
3/4kg veal
1 teaspoon black pepper
2-4 cups water
lamb casing
50 g salt
1 tablespoon sugar

However, this is a smoked recipe which advocates "Curing" with saltpetre, sugar and salt and drying for a day before smoking.


Hope this helps,
Richard
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Postby RichardAllen » Wed Dec 22, 2010 8:53 am

Tristar,

Thank you very much. My smoker is about to be updated from the Mk3 to Mk4, so I will try the recipe out and let you know how it goes. If I can get some veal in UK of course ...

Regards
Richard
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Postby tristar » Wed Dec 22, 2010 9:13 am

Good luck, looking forward to seeing a successful outcome! Don't forget to post some pictures!

The recipe found didn't have any detailed instructions but if you follow the instructions for an emulsified sausage of any type you should be ok! It said on that Swedish forum that it was a type of Vienna Sausage.

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Postby grisell » Wed Dec 22, 2010 2:16 pm

Being Swedish, I feel privileged to reply. :)

This is a recipe from Svensk Kokkonst (=Swedish Cookery) from 1918. I've tried it myself, and it's completely reliable. It calls for light cream, which by then also served as a lactic acid fermentation starter. Nowadays, milk is pasteurized, so I use to add yoghurt as a starter. It's important to give the sausage time to ferment. The sour taste is an attribute of prinskorv (although there are unfermented types too). I would substitute ale for the small beer. Prinskorv means Prince Sausage, which probably comes from its small size. As with most old recipes, measures are not very exact. I give the recipe in its original form. The seasoning should be very subtle and discrete.

The classic serving of prinskorv is fried with scrambled eggs.


Prinskorv

1½-2 kg pork
1 kg back fat
1 kg veal
Salt, pepper
A little cayenne
A little powdered ginger
A little powdered allspice
1/4 litre cream
1/4 litre small beer + a little distilled vinegar
Veal stock
Sheep casings
(Lactic acid fermentation starter)

Soak the casings for a few hours in the small beer and vinegar. Grind the meat very finely. Mix with spices, cream, starter and stock. Emulsify. Stuff into casings and make 4-6 cm/~2 inch links. Let ferment in a hot place for 24 hours. Continue following this recipe http://www.wedlinydomowe.com/sausage-re ... rankfurter from paragraph 4.

NB that this recipe doesn't contain cure. I recommend adding cure.
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Postby grisell » Wed Dec 22, 2010 7:15 pm

RichardAllen wrote:Tristar,

[---]
If I can get some veal in UK of course ...

Regards
Richard


Don't worry. Same thing in Sweden. I think most prinskorvs of today are 100% pork.
André

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Re: Swedish Prinskorv

Postby gsevelle » Thu Jan 07, 2016 12:37 am

My wife, son and I traveled this holiday season, one of our stops was with Swedish relatives. They laid out a wonder meal for us which included Prinskorv. My wife has asked me to replicate it. These particular sausages were in a very small casing. I would like to get my hands on them and am wondering if you might know where I can find such small casings, I'm guessing but I think they were about 12mm to 15mm the smallest I can find is 18mm.

I'm in the USA so would need a source here in the states. I've sourced Butcher & Packer and the Syracuse Casing company with the smallest Lamb casing being 18mm/20mm. Any thoughts or suggestions.
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Re: Swedish Prinskorv

Postby vagreys » Thu Jan 07, 2016 5:23 am

Look at edible collagen casing. I haven't found any in the 12-15mm range, at all, anywhere. I have found 16mm edible mahogany collagen casing from The Sausage Make. 18, 19 and 21mm edible collagen casing is available from a number of sources. Remember you need a stuffer tube capable of handling casing that small.
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Re: Swedish Prinskorv

Postby pilsnerkokaren » Sun May 15, 2016 8:06 am

I make prinskorv 3-4 times a year and it is my favorite sausages. Perfect for breakfast, lunch and supper. When I started making sausages for 6-8 years ago, I got a butcher's book with recipes off different Swedish sausages. The problem is that all the recipes were at 100kg sausages. This recipe comes from the book but I have recalculated the amount to 5kg sausage. With 19/21mm casings you need 30-35M becourse you will get about 270-280 sausages.

Image

1.2 kg minced pork
1.0 kg minced backfat
0.4 kg minced veal
0.4 kg minced beef
217gr potato flour
80gr salt with nitrit
50gr sugar
145gr milk powder
1.4 liters of ice-cold water
2 pinches of ground dried ginger
2 pinches of ground white pepper
1 pinch of ground nutmeg

Mix all the meat with salt, potato flour and spices. Dilute with milk powder and add the backfat. Mix everything in 10 minutes before diluting with the cold water. Just pour in a little water at a time, imagine that you should make mayonnaise. It will not be good if you pour in all the oil at once, just take it easy.
Fill the mixture into 19-21mm casings, braid as it looks in the picture. smoke the sausages for 1-2 hours until they are nicely browned at 75-80°C, and then simmer them for 20 minutes in 80°C salted water with whole white peppercorns and bay leaf.
I guess this recipe is very similar to ordinary frankfurter and it probably is too.
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Re: Swedish Prinskorv

Postby wheels » Sun May 15, 2016 12:55 pm

Welcome Pilsnerkokaren and thanks for posting this recipe.

For the benefit of non-european members, the salt with nitrit(e) will be around 0.6% nitrite and give 160PPM in the finished product. Members using Cure #1 (6.25% nitrite) should use 7.5gm and make the rest up with plain salt.

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Re: Swedish Prinskorv

Postby NCPaul » Sun May 15, 2016 2:21 pm

Welcome to the forum. :D It looks like you are using your brew kettle to cook sausages.
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Re: Swedish Prinskorv

Postby gsevelle » Sun May 15, 2016 3:00 pm

pilsnerkokaren :D Welcome to the forum and thank you for posting your recipe. I have managed to find 20-22mm and 22-24 mm lamb casings. I currently have some of the 22-24 mm in the frig. and will be using those. I tried to use these casings on some hot dogs but did not have the correct size horn for my maker. I have since corrected that error and have a smaller horn that I can now get the casings on. Speaking of that are there any tricks you use to open up the casings for washing and loading on to the horn. I have big hands and find these casings very challenging to work with.

:P Shout out to Wheels from my side of the pond for the salt conversion.

George
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Re: Swedish Prinskorv

Postby wheels » Sun May 15, 2016 5:27 pm

You're welcome...

...and, as to the casings? I get Mrs Wheels to load them!

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Re: Swedish Prinskorv

Postby pilsnerkokaren » Sun May 15, 2016 6:49 pm

Thanks for your welcome.

Yes, it´s my old brew kettle that now are used to cook sausages in.

I use the same recipe when I make Wiener, but then I use 21/23mm casings instead. Started making sausages years ago just to see if I could make prinskorv. The one you can buy in the store is cheap but the taste is just as the price, also cheap :(

Yes, it is difficult to find the opening in such small casings and I have not come up with any easy way to do it either. Soaking them in warm water before makes it a bit easier, but not much.

Has been working to many hours this spring and needed to do something that is fun, so this weekend I have made 5kg prinskorv, 2kg Mortadella, 2kg duck sausages and 2kg lamb sausages.
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Re: Swedish Prinskorv

Postby wheels » Sun May 15, 2016 11:01 pm

They look superb.

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