Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking and Curing

Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking and Curing

Postby Wilf » Sat Dec 31, 2005 11:03 am

Got this as a pressie, haven't had full investigation in it yet but covers a lot of things on this site

http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASI ... 47-4616422[url][/url]
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Postby TJ Buffalo » Sat Dec 31, 2005 1:27 pm

Yeah, I had just got it for an xmas present, it looks pretty interesting at first skim.
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Postby aris » Sat Dec 31, 2005 1:51 pm

Post some interesting recipes for us :-)
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Postby dougal » Tue May 09, 2006 9:55 am

I've just invested in this.
Yes its american (but it does have metric measurements as well as 'cups').
Yes, there's not much about *cold* smoking. (And almost nothing on smoking hardware.)
Yes, a few of the recipes aren't 'authentic' - for example the lamb/pork (rather than lamb/beef) "merguez".
And including salt cod and gravadlax as 'Charcuterie' is similarly loose - albeit brilliant to put those alongside bacon curing, to demonstrate the similarity.
And yes, they want to hot smoke the bacon, US/"Canadian" style.
No, it doesn't have any photo's - but there are photorealistic drawings which seem to perfectly illustrate the points they are addressing.

BUT -
I think the organisation is very rational. From salting and brining to smoking, then sausages (inc smoked ones), then on to dried meats and sausages, with a chapter on pat�s and one on accompaniments to close.
The writing is very lucid. (Thus far, I've only noticed a couple of lapses.)
The emphasis seems to be on communicating an understanding of the processes, rather than simply listing recipes.

I only got it a couple of days ago, so I'm reluctant to be too absolute, but it looks good. Damn good, in fact, for the thoughtful but inexperienced enthusiast - like me!

What do others think, now they've had it for a few months?
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Postby Paul Kribs » Tue May 09, 2006 12:41 pm

I got this as a birthday gift in March, and found it a very interesting read, and have made some chorizo and salami's and Bresaolas using the recipes.

Regards, Paul Kribs
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Postby pokerpete » Tue May 09, 2006 2:29 pm

I have a couple of books here that are useful. One is by Jane Grigson written in 1967 called 'Charcuterie and French pork cookery' published by Penguin ISBN 0-14-046792-0.
The other is about brining and smoking by Innes Walker, now buried under a pile of box files. Anyway google in Innes Walker and phone them up for a copy. This company is hands on and make a whole range of smokers hot and cold in all sizes including one for the hobbyist. Invaluable info. in it.
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Postby Paul Kribs » Wed Aug 30, 2006 7:01 pm

As Jane Grigson's 'Charcuterie' has had numerous favourable references on this forum, I have decided to get it and just had a mad 15 minutes on Amazon. I have ordered:-

"The River Cottage Meat Book"
Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall;

"Nose to Tail Eating: A Kind of British Cooking"
Fergus Henderson

"Charcuterie and French Pork Cookery"
Jane Grigson

"The Fifth Quarter: An Offal Cookbook"
Anissa Helou


For what it cost I could have bought another � pig... and after a bit of reading I probably will :wink:

Regards, Paul Kribs
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Postby jenny_haddow » Thu Aug 31, 2006 10:59 am

Paul

The recipe on page 81 of Nose to Tail Eating comes highly recommended.

Cheers

Jen
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Postby Paul Kribs » Fri Sep 01, 2006 2:34 pm

Jen

I looked at the recipe, sounds good. There are so many recipes it'll take a while to read, let alone cook them.
Only 2 of my books have arrived thus far, so I've emailed Amazon asking what's happening as I paid first class postage, and the second order arrived first.

Also decided to get HFW's Pig in a day DVD...

Regards, Paul Kribs
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Postby Ma » Sat Sep 02, 2006 11:08 am

That's a great dvd Paul, it's what got me going on this lark in the first place! Very clear and informative.
life is a waste of time, time is a waste of life, get wasted all the time and you'll have the time of your life!
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Postby this41uk » Sun Nov 05, 2006 2:31 pm

I got a copy of Charcuterrie the Craft of Salting, Smoking and Curing for Fathers day. Its great I've made the Pancetta twice and have just made some Tuscan Salami. Its a great book I would highly recomend it.

PS just got a copy of a new book The Sausage Book by Paul Peacock, looks good, hoping it will inprove my feash sausages. (make the eddible)
Old and Confused but Still a Happy Camper
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Postby DarrinG » Wed Nov 29, 2006 3:39 am

Just got my copy of Charcuterie today! Got it on a whim. Is there any recommended musts I need to be aware of?

Thanks

DarrinG
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Postby Buckskin » Thu Apr 03, 2008 3:57 pm

I purchased this book a couple months ago. Very informative for all, especially for beginners. Written very well and makes you extremely hungry and motivated.
I have done a few of the recipes in here.
sour kraut, lemon confit (still curing), dry cured jowel, pork and garlic sausage, coppa (just started curing).
And am planning on doing many more, unfortunately I'm running out of fress pork. I wish I would have bought the book (or found this website) a month prior, because I butchered a hog and tossed out countless pounds of backfat that I could really use now.
I do have a skinless whole ham that may be sacraficed for sausage. :lol:
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Postby Buckskin » Thu Apr 03, 2008 4:01 pm

Forgot to mention that I also made the smoked spiced almonds, that were awesome!
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Postby Iamarealbigdog » Mon Apr 07, 2008 5:32 pm

FAN FRACKIN TASTIC.....


I got this book last year and it is just the best of the dozen books I have on this topic. I have read it twice cover to cover.

For Americans they have a real civil and global approach. It is not all about southern BBQ which is a topic onto it self. If you had only one book to choose from this is it so far. A create mix of technical information and a good supply of recipes.

We made the peperone, side bacon, salmon, bresoala, comfit, ham and countless sausages from this book. Most recipes are basic flavour and on the second time in making most of them we have enhanced the flavours.

I was most impressed with the bresoala, but use a whole eye of the round, we kept it to three inches diameter (cut it lengthwise) and it was too small and dried up too fast.
Cheers from The Big Dog
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http://blog.lesnoiracochon.com

Where tasty things happen
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