Mustard

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Mustard

Postby Franco » Mon Dec 20, 2004 9:33 pm

Does anyone have a good recipe for home made mustard?


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Mustard

Postby Parson Snows » Tue Dec 21, 2004 7:18 am

Is there any particular type of mustard that you are looking for?

kind regards

Parson Snows

PS did you get the sausage recipes I sent you ?
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mustard

Postby Franco » Tue Dec 21, 2004 7:46 am

I am looking for any types of mustard, I have a good supply of different types of seed which I use in the sausage mixes so I'm open to suggestions.

Thanks, I did get the recipes,I thought I'd PM'd you. I'll resend now.


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Mustard Recipes

Postby Parson Snows » Tue Dec 21, 2004 9:13 am

I'll post some of the ones that I have in the next couple of days

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Postby Twoscoops » Tue Dec 21, 2004 9:15 am

200g mustard seeds (black and yellow mixed or just black)
500ml white wine vinegar
100g soft brown sugar
2 bayleaves

Put the ingredients in a jar or plastic container, seal and leave to stand for four weeks, shaking occasionally. Remove bayleaves then tip into a blender and whizz until you reach the desired consistency; coarse or fine.

This is what I have in my fridge at the moment, my first attempt. I have a new batch maturing in the garage, but I used cider vinegar and honey instead. Will let you know how it goes.
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Postby sausagemaker » Tue Dec 21, 2004 7:27 pm

Hi Franco

please find below 4 recipes from:-


Mustard, Pickles & Chutney's

written by Margaret O'Sullivan 1992
ISBN No. 185410215x

Basic Mustard

50 g (2 oz) black mustard seeds
50 g (2 oz) white mustard seeds
1 teaspoon salt
Water
White wine vinegar

Grind the mustard seeds in a coffee grinder if you have one, otherwise use a mortar and pestle. Put into a bowl with enough water to moisten, leave for 10 minutes, then add the salt, stir, and put into a jar with enough white wine vinegar to cover. Cover the jar and leave for 1 week, then drain off the excess liquid.
Cover again and store in a cool, dark place. It will keep well for several months. You can vary the flavour by adding other spices or herbs with the vinegar. And you can make a milder mustard (and stretch the quantity) by adding some flour with the salt.

Apricot Mustard

The fruity flavours of this apricot mustard go well with barbecued chicken and pork spareribs.

100 g (4 oz) mustard powder
3 teaspoons sherry
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon finely chopped (minced) dried apricots
'A cup (4 fl oz) apricot nectar
Mix all ingredients in a blender or food processor. It can be used immediately.

Green Pepper Mustard

One of the classic flavoured mustards.
50 g (2 oz) blacK mustard seeds
50 g (2 oz) white mustard seeds
25 g (1 oz) green peppercorns
Water
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
1 teaspoon salt
White wine vinegar

Grind the mustard seeds and green peppercorns in a coffee grinder or mortar and pestle. Put into a bowl with enough water to moisten, and leave for 10 minutes. Add the turmeric and salt, then mix in enough white wine vinegar to make a paste and put into a jar. Leave for at least 1 week before using.

Crunchy Mustard

100 g (4 oz) white mustard seeds
100 g (4 oz) black mustard seeds
1 teaspoon black peppercorns
3 blades mace (if unavailable 3 teaspoons ground mace)
1 teaspoon fennel seeds
1 dried chilli
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
Cider vinegar

Grind the spices in a coffee grinder, then add enough cider vinegar to make a paste. Keep for 1 week before using.

Hope this helps

Regards

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Mustard Recipes

Postby Parson Snows » Wed Dec 22, 2004 9:11 am

As promised

These recipes are taken from �A Dash of Mustard� by Katy Holder & Jane Newdick (ISBN 0 7858 0351 3) a great book (127 pages) of extensive information on mustard(s)

Green Herb Mustard
This is a great all-round mustard with a fair amount of heat.

2 Tblspns yellow mustard seeds, finely ground
2 Tblspns brown mustard seeds, finely ground
1 Tblspn fresh parsley or 2 tspns dried parsley
1 Tblspn fresh thyme or 2 tspns dried thyme
1 Tblspn fresh oregano or 2 tspns dried oregano
1 clove garlic, roughly chopped
4 Tblspns white wine vinegar
2 Tblspns olive oil
1 tspn salt
freshly ground black pepper

Honey Mustard
This sweet mustard needs a minimum of three weeks for its flavour to develop

2 Tblspns yellow mustard seed, finely ground
2 Tblspns mustard powder
3 Tblspns clear honey
4 Tblspns white wine vinegar
1 Tblspn green peppercorns, crushed
1 Tblspn brown sugar

Horseradish Mustard
If you like your mustard really hot, this is the one for you.

2 Tblspns horseradish sauce
4 Tblspsns mustard powder
2 tspns sugar
1 tspn salt
4 Tblspns olive oil

Tarragon Mustard
This is a very hot sweet mustard. If it appears too thick, add an additional tablespoon of tarragon vinegar.

4 Tblspns yellow mustard seeds, finely ground
4 Tblpsns chopped fresh tarragon, stems removed, or 1 Tblspn dried tarragon
4 Tblspns tarragaon vinegar
1 tspn salt
2 Tblspns sugar
2 Tblspns mustard powder
1 Tblspn clear honey

hope that these are of some use to you

kind regards

Parson Snows
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There's ten around the table
And food enough for five... Amen
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Postby Guest » Wed Dec 22, 2004 3:10 pm

I would be interested in a recipe for a traditional German mustard.

I bought some recently but was dissapointed, it tasted mostly of vinegar.

I was expecting something very dark, somewhat sweet and rich and rounded with a complex flavour.

Or have I just mis-remembered what it was like?


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Mustard Recipes

Postby Parson Snows » Thu Dec 23, 2004 4:14 pm

These recipes are from �The Book of Preserves: Jams, Chutneys, Pickles , Jellies� by Mary Norwak (ISBN 0 86101 244 5, 128 pages)

Extra Strong Mustard
4 Tblspns white mustard seeds
� tspn ground nutmeg
� tspn grated horseradish
� tspn ground allspice
8 Tblspns white wine vinegar
Salt and Pepper

In a food processor/blender or a coffee grinder, crush mustard seeds. In a small saucepan cook mustard seeds with nutmeg, horseradish, allspice and vinegar over low heat 5 minutes or until thick and creamy. Cool completely. Add salt and pepper to taste. Spoon into sterilized jar. Seal tightly.
Let mature 1 week before using.

Makes 8 Tblspns

Household Mustard
310 ml (10 fl oz/1 � cups) water
2 tspns sea salt
4 Tblspns white mustard seeds
8 Tblspns white wine vinegar
Salt and Pepper

In a small saucepan, boil water and sea salt. Remove from heat. Let stand until lukewarm. In a medium bowl, pour salt water over mustard seeds. Let stand 12 hours, drain. Using a wooden spoon crush seeds until soft and creamy.
In a small saucepan, bring vinegar to the boil. Gradually add to mustard. Add salt and pepper to taste. Spoon into a clean jar. Cover tightly.
Let mature several days before using. Will keep up to 1 month.

Makes 1 (250g/8 oz)

Kind regards

Parson Snows
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And food enough for five... Amen
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Postby aris » Thu Dec 23, 2004 4:16 pm

Surely there must be quite a variety of mustard seeds besides yellow & brown :-)

I wouldn't mind seeing a good seed mustard recipe like the french Pommery.
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Mustard Recipes

Postby Parson Snows » Fri Dec 24, 2004 8:25 am

Mustard belongs to the cruciferae group of plants.
There are three (3) types of mustard seed grown these are
1) brassica niagra (black)
2) brassica juncea (brown)
3) brassica alba (white or yellow). This is sometimes referred to as brassica hirta or sinapis alba

Mustard Recipes
The following recipes are taken from �Clearly Delicious: An Illustrated Guide to Preserving, Pickling & Bottling� by Elizabeth Lambert Ortiz (ISBN 0 7513 0090 x/144 pages)

Whole Grain Mustard
Ingredients
100 g (4 oz) whole black or brown mustard seeds
175 � 200 ml (6 � 7 fl oz) white wine vinegar
50 g (2 oz) whole yellow mustard seeds
15 ml (1 Tblspn) salt

1) put the black mustard seeds into a non-metallic bowl and pour over 150 (5 fl oz) of the vinegar. Cover and leave overnight.
2) The next day, use a mortar and pestle to pound the mixture until the seeds are coarsely broken. Grind the yellow mustard seeds in an electric blender to a very fine powder (my note: or use a spice mill/coffee grinder) Combine the two mixtures and stir in the rest of the vinegar and the salt.
3) Spoon into sterilized jars. Seal, label and keep in a cool dark place for two (2) weeks before using, to allow the flavours to develop.

Fills about three (3) 150 ml (5 fl oz) jars

English Mustard
Ingredients
100 g (4 oz) whole yellow mustards seeds
15 g ( � oz) plain flour
15 ml (1 Tblspn) salt
175 ml (6 fl oz) light ale (my note: any British beer will do, even lager at a push)

1) Put the mustard seeds iin an electric grinder and grind to a fine powder. Transfer to a bowl, and sift in the flour and salt. Mix together well. Gradually beat in the ale to make a smooth paste.
2) Spoon the mustard into sterilized jars. Seal the jars and label. Keep in a cool dark place for two (2) weeks before using, to allow the flavours to develop.

Fills about two (2) 150 ml (5 fl oz) jars

Kind regards

Parson Snows
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There's ten around the table
And food enough for five... Amen
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Postby aris » Fri Dec 24, 2004 8:38 am

So are the yellow seeds the pungent horseradish flavour ones as used in traditional english mustard?

The pommery mustard I'd like to try and make is not strong like english mustard, but seems to have a mixture of seeds - perhaps brown & white - and the seeds are left whole.

Anyone tried to make this?
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Mustard

Postby Parson Snows » Fri Dec 24, 2004 9:42 am

Aris

Although the pungency of black mustard is slightly stronger than that of brown mustard, black mustard is hardly planted in Europe anymore, and brown mustard is the dominating quality on the European market. The reason is that brown mustard, unlike black mustard, can be harvested by machines which make production much cheaper in countries where working force is expensive. The strengths/pungency of the mustards are in order black, brown, and white/yellow.

http://www.theepicentre.com/Spices/mustard.html

Is it a mixture of mustard seeds or white/yellow mustard seeds and green peppercorns? If you decide that it's the mustard seeds a combination of white/yellow and brown mustard seeds would probably be the best, otherwise use white/yellow mustard seeds and green peppercorns. You mentioned that the seeds are kept whole I would recommend soaking half of them in water overnight and then lightly pounding them to release the flavour. Also what are you planning on using for a binder, typically it�s finely ground mustard powder and/or plain flour. As to the mellowness of the mustard, add sugar as this will counteract the hotness/bitterness of the mustard, you also may want to add white wine insted of vinegar. I haven�t found any recipe for this as of yet.

Kind regards

Parson Snows
Last edited by Parson Snows on Fri Dec 24, 2004 11:01 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby Oddley » Fri Dec 24, 2004 9:48 am

Black mustard seeds are freely available in most supermarkets as they are a part of Indian cookery. You wouldn't have known that parson being in the hinterland of Asia.

I think Jamie Oliver has also made them popular through his cookery programs.
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Indian Foods

Postby Parson Snows » Fri Dec 24, 2004 10:23 am

Oddley

Loving Indian food, and being the current �Menu/venue� coordinator for the �Bangkok International Curry Club� � the lads get kitted out in tuxedos and meet up every 2 months for an Indian meal � I am well aware of the use of black peppers in Indian cooking. There are in fact numerous quality Indian restaurants in Thailand, and a large Thai/Indian community. I also get back to the UK occasionally, and regularly watch Jamie Oliver (Oliver�s Twist). I was in fact impressed with the selection of Thai products now available in the supermarkets.

Kind regards

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And food enough for five... Amen
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