Bread and butter pudding

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Bread and butter pudding

Postby Franco » Mon Dec 20, 2004 9:35 pm

I want to make a traditional bread and butter pudding on Christmas day, as it is going to be one off dish I would like a good recipe using nonlow fat ingredients and don't mind how rich it is!

Does anyone have a family recipe?

Franco
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Postby Oddley » Mon Dec 20, 2004 11:37 pm

Franco this is not really a family recipe as my mum was a terrible cook. I got this recipe years ago and have cooked it a few times it tastes wonderful. I couldn't find the recipe but I had an idea of the chefs name so I managed after quite a bit of searching to find the chefs whole name plus the recipe.

Anton Mosimann's Bread and Butter Pudding

Serves 6

Preparation time 30 mins to 1 hour

Cooking time 1 to 2 hours

Ingredients

30g/1�oz unsalted butter
3 small bread rolls, sliced
250ml/16fl oz milk
250ml/16fl oz double cream
a pinch of salt
1 vanilla pod, split
3 eggs
125g/4�oz sugar
10g/�oz sultanas, soaked in water and drained
20g/�oz apricot jam, sieved
icing sugar, to dust

Method

1. Lightly butter a large ovenproof dish.
2. Use the rest of the butter to spread over the bread slices. Arrange the bread slices in the base of the dish.
3. Bring the milk, double cream, salt and vanilla pod gently to the boil in a pan.
4. In a bowl mix together the eggs and sugar until pale.
5. Gradually add the milk and cream mixture to the eggs, stirring well to amalgamate. Strain into a clean pan.
6. Add the soaked sultanas to the bread in the dish, along with the milk mixture. The bread will float to the top.
7. Place the prepared dish in a bain marie on top of folded paper/tea towel to ensure even cooking 180C/325F/Gas 3, and pour enough hot water to come halfway up the sides of the dish. Bake carefully in the preheated oven for 45 to 50 minutes. When the pudding is ready, it should wobble very slightly in the middle. Remove from the oven and cool a little.
8. Gently heat the apricot jam, thinning with a little water if necessary. Lightly brush a thin coat of the warm glaze over the top of the pudding, and then dust with icing sugar. Serve slightly warm.


If you do cook this recipe don't be tempted to change the quantities and say put more sultanas in the dish. If needed just cook two of them or double the recipe in a bigger dish. You might need more cooking time though. The bread rolls are ordinary English bread rolls.
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Postby Spuddy » Tue Dec 21, 2004 5:39 pm

That is a good recipe, I have done very similar myself in the past (I used to be a chef) and that looks like it will be nice and rich.
If you want even more richness try using brioche or croissants instead of bread. (I prefer croissants but both are good).
The only thing I would change is instead of just boiling the vanilla pod it gives a better flavour and appearance to scrape out the seeds and whisk them into the custard mixture.
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Postby Guest » Tue Dec 21, 2004 6:18 pm

Franco

We all know Anton Mossiman is a world famous chef and that he has regulary cooked for H.M. the Queen, his recipe is a very good one and I would support the idea of using croissants. I could supply you recipes of my own , but with all honesty I don't think I could beat the one above.

Tip: Allow several days for the bread/croissants to go stale before use.

Regards

Fatman
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Postby Spuddy » Tue Dec 21, 2004 6:40 pm

Anonymous wrote:Franco

We all know Anton Mossiman is a world famous chef and that he has regulary cooked for H.M. the Queen, his recipe is a very good one and I would support the idea of using croissants. I could supply you recipes of my own , but with all honesty I don't think I could beat the one above.

Tip: Allow several days for the bread/croissants to go stale before use.

Regards

Fatman



I've cooked for a few Queens in my time but not H.M. :lol:

Absolutely right, stale is best. If in a rush you can fake staleness by leaving it overnight in a previously warmed and then turned off oven.

PS How come you're not logged in?
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Bread & Butter Pudding

Postby Parson Snows » Wed Dec 22, 2004 9:46 am

It does look a great recipe, in fact I think I'll make one also. Glancing over the recipe the only points that I can see are

10g/�oz sultanas, soaked in water and drained


I would suggest leaving these to soak overnight

3. Bring the milk, double cream, salt and vanilla pod gently to the boil in a pan.
4. In a bowl mix together the eggs and sugar until pale.
5. Gradually add the milk and cream mixture to the eggs, stirring well to amalgamate. Strain into a clean pan.


As eggs set at a relatively low temperature, if the milk/cream mixture is anywhere near boiling when it is added to the eggs/sugar paste there is a fair chance that the mixture will be cooked or partially cooked which is not what you are looking for. I would recommend only heating the milk/cream mixture until just before it simmers (wispy steam rolling over the surface of the mixture).

I like the idea of the crossaints.

kind regards

Parson Snows
Heavenly Father Bless us
And keep us all alive
There's ten around the table
And food enough for five... Amen
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