ISO: Curries/Indian Recipes

All other recipes including your personal favourite and any seasonal tips to share

ISO: Curries/Indian Recipes

Postby deb » Mon Dec 27, 2004 12:05 pm

Hi Oddley. On another thread - Bombay Bangers? - you seem to be a dab hand at the old Curry. I'm always in need of good curry recipes/tips so any chance you could post some when time permits?
Thanks.
Last edited by deb on Thu Dec 30, 2004 9:35 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Pat Chapman (Curries)

Postby Parson Snows » Tue Dec 28, 2004 12:55 pm

deb

check out the following Curry Cookbooks, they actually work

http://www.patchapman.co.uk/page2.html? ... blications

also check out any second hand book shops for any of his books, they are worth picking up.

Hope that this is of some use to you

kind regards

Parson Snows

PS is there any particular recipe that you are looking for?
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Postby deb » Tue Dec 28, 2004 1:07 pm

Thanks Parson, I actually have a few of Pat's Curry Club books and use them.
Just asking for Oddley's Tried & Tested recipes, if he doesn't mind giving them, as they must be good if people ask him to make them for dinner parties. Always interested in recipes that people use, like and can recommend.
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Curries

Postby Parson Snows » Tue Dec 28, 2004 3:01 pm

deb

I'm a great lover of Indian food and at present I'm the "Menu/Venue" coordinator of the Bangkok International Curry Club (have been for the last two years), so if there is anything that you get stuck with or need I could help, time permitting. I was the one that first posted the "Bombay Banger" query as I'd like to try and make something similar here.

hope that this is of some use to you.

kind regards

Parson Snows
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And food enough for five... Amen
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Postby Oddley » Tue Dec 28, 2004 10:59 pm

Deb I tend to make them up as I go along. I suppose it's just doing it for so long.

I will post the one I did for my sister. But I have to write it out first and of course remember what I put in the thing.
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Postby Oddley » Tue Dec 28, 2004 11:40 pm

Ok here it is if you try it let me know how you got on.
Pukka Chicken Curry

servings 10

Ingredients:

10 Skinned breasts of chicken (11/2 cm cubed)
Yogurt ( about 1/2 pint)
4-5 Onions (Chopped Medium to fine)
6-7 tbs Vegetable oil
2 inch long piece fresh ginger (about 2 oz)
4 fresh cloves garlic
3 hot fresh red chilies ( cut from just below stem to tip turn 90 deg do it again so it splays open)
1/2 tube Tomato puree (about 3 tbs)
1 pint chicken stock (or use a knorr chicken cube)
1 Good bunch fresh coriander (about 20 stalks)
1 1/2 heaped tsp cumin seed powder
1 1/2 heaped tsp coriander seed powder
1 heaped tsp paprika
1 stick cinnamon
8 cloves
1 tsp fresh ground black pepper
salt

Method:

Prepare the coriander by giving it a good wash still bunched cut the first 1/2 in off the stalk. then chop very finely up the stalks till you reach the leaves put this aside the roughly chop the leaves. Next liquidize the ginger and garlic in a little water. Now we can start cooking. In a hot wok or pot fry the onions in the oil until they are slightly caramelised add the ginger and garlic paste and fry until all the water is gone. We can then turn down the heat to low and add all the spices fry for about five minutes this is important it blends all the tastes together. Now add the Chicken and tomato puree. When the tomato puree and the spices start to split from the oil turn up the heat add the stock and fresh coriander stalks you chopped then the salt and pepper. Leave this to simmer for about 3/4 of an hour then turn the heat off and stir in the yogurt and a good handful of the chopped coriander leaves.

Tip: Don't let it dry out add water if you think necessary.


I go a lot on taste when cooking and make little adjustments as I go along hopefully this will come out OK my sisters curry was beautiful.
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Postby deb » Wed Dec 29, 2004 6:44 pm

Thanks for the offer of help Parson, I don't have anything specific at the moment I just like to have curry recipes that people make for themselves.
Thanks too Oddley for the recipe. If you should think of any others you make and can find the time and inclination to post them I'd be grateful, anytime will do, "pretty please". Tried and Tested are ALWAYS the best.
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Indian Recipes

Postby Parson Snows » Thu Dec 30, 2004 2:41 am

deb (or anyone)

if you're interested in my recipe for Onion Bhajia I will be more than glad to post it on the forum.

kind regards

Parson Snows

PS just a suggestion but you may want to edit the Subject to "Curries/Indian Recipes" so that the rest of the forum know what this thread is about.
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Postby deb » Thu Dec 30, 2004 9:37 am

Yes please Parson the recipe would be much appreciated.

Good suggestion about the title, hopefully I've changed it.
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Onopn Bhajia Recipe

Postby Parson Snows » Thu Dec 30, 2004 12:32 pm

deb, and others

here's my personal Onion Bhajia recipe

100 g Spanish onion (finely sliced)
2 cloves Garlic (passed through a garlic press or finely chopped)
6 Tblspns (90 ml) COLD water

DRY INGREDIENTS
5 Tblspns (75 ml) Besam Flour
1/8 tspn (pinch) of salt
1/2 tspn (2.5 ml) ground coriander
1/2 tspn (2.5 ml) ground cumin
1/2 tspn (2.5 ml) chilli powder
3/4 tspn (3.75 ml) ground turmeric
1/2 tspn (2.5 ml) ground ginger
1/2 tspn (2.5 ml) baking powder

* Mix all of the dry ingredients throughly together
* Add the water and garlic again mixing in throughly to a smooth paste
* Preheat some peanut or vegetable oil (Chip temperature)
* Add the sliced onion to the spice mixture and mix in making sure that the onion is evenly covered/coated by the mixture
* using a teaspoon (or two if required) place the mixture into the heated oil, a teaspoon at a time, keeping each spoonful separate and cook for approximately one minute or until crisp and brown. Turn over if required
* Remove from oil and drain on absorbent kitchen paper for one to two minutes
* Serve with a fresh mint and coriander chutney


hope that this is of some use to you

kind regards

Parson Snows
Heavenly Father Bless us
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There's ten around the table
And food enough for five... Amen
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Postby deb » Thu Dec 30, 2004 2:54 pm

Thanks Parson. I love Onion Bhajia's.
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Onion Bhajia

Postby Parson Snows » Thu Dec 30, 2004 3:13 pm

deb

You're welcome. Just don't get the oil to hot at the beginning.

kind regards

Parson Snows

PS let me know what you think of them if you make any. I'll dig out my Fresh Mint and Coriander Chutney recipe in the NEW YEAR and post it.
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Onion Bhajia

Postby Parson Snows » Tue Jan 25, 2005 8:47 am

deb wrote
Thanks Parson. I love Onion Bhajia's

Did you ever try it out, and if so any comments/suggestions etc.

kind regards

Parson Snows
Heavenly Father Bless us
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There's ten around the table
And food enough for five... Amen
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Onion Bhajias

Postby kennyliza » Mon Nov 28, 2005 8:27 pm

Dear Parsons,
I too have a good recipe for onion bhajias, not a million miles off your own one, but I must say that every time I make it for my family, they get polished off in minutes. I'd be happy to share it if you like.
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Postby aeddon » Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:55 pm

meat curries really do call for (what most people call, and stay away from) the cheap cuts of meat that take time to cook. the lamb and beef cuts that are too chewy for our fast cook fast convienant society, but when cooked slowly are far tastyier.

A curry is only a stew. there are hundreds of varieties, with no end to the variation of spices. Most curries call for the same proceedure

-Make a dry masala (dry roast whole spices and grind and/or ground spices - the list is too long to write)
-mix it into a wet masala paste (some or all of garlic, chilli, ginger, purified onion, vinager)
-brown meat in batches
-fry off black mustard seeds (most recipies but not all)
-fry onions untill brown flecks appear
-mix in masala paste and fry
-add meat and fry for 5/10mins
-add water/stock and boil between 1 and 2 hrs depending on meat
-then either add gharam masala 20mins before finishing or when ready to serve.

A masala is just the indian name for a spice mix. like a rue is the french name for the base for a sauce made of flour and butter. Once you have made a masala to your liking you use a pestle and mortor to grind together a mix of chilli, garlic, onion, ginger and/or a liquid - vinegar for instance if its an sweet and sour dish like vindaloo.

if you do this the you will rarely fail. But a good curry does take time to make from scratch.

Traditionly, like most cultures, the men go to work and (not the only job one of many) the women cook - rice, curries, breads, salads etc. not just the wife but the children, the wife and the granny all cook and they progress up the culinary ladder as the older ones pop off

Like Oddly said, it can really be made up as you go along. it more of a state of mind than a strict cooking disipline.

For instance:
-a bit of cinninam bark, 8 cloves, 1 tsp of cumin, 1.5 tsp of corriander seed, the seeds of 4 cardimon pods, dry roasted and ground.
-3 cloves of garlic, 1 tsp salt, 1 red chilli (with or with seeds), 1 inch cude of ginger, and 1/2 a liquidised onion all mixed together then mixed with the masala
or
-a bit of cinninam bark, 1 tsp of cumin, 1.5 tsp of corriander seed, the seeds of 2 cardimon pods, dry roasted and ground. then mixed with 1/2tsp ground ginger, cumin, corriander
-2 cloves of garlic, 5 green chillis (with or with seeds), 2.5inch cude of ginger the juice of 2 limes, 1.5tsp salt, 1 large handful of cilantro(carriander leaf) and a little sugar then mixed with the masala

now you have what is in the jars of pataks


some call for lots of peppers, some for lots of small green chillis others for just chilli flakes, some call for cashew nuts, some for mushrooms...

but the procedure is nearly always the same



Bit of an ambiguios answer, but there you go
Last edited by aeddon on Thu Dec 01, 2005 11:10 am, edited 1 time in total.
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