Yoghurt

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Postby wheels » Sat May 22, 2010 3:03 pm

Thanks Mate. LMFAO :wink:

(That's 'Youf speak' John) :lol:
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Postby johnfb » Sun May 23, 2010 12:47 pm

wheels wrote:Thanks Mate. LMFAO :wink:

(That's 'Youf speak' John) :lol:


youf..... :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Postby Oddley » Sun May 23, 2010 10:19 pm

I think it would probably work in the easy yo maker, Dave, if it does, let us know what you think of the recipe.
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Postby jenny_haddow » Mon May 24, 2010 7:53 am

Thanks for the recipe Oddley, I'll give it a go. I usually use an electric yoghurt maker, although I've got one like yours that I picked up in a charity shop.
I used it a couple of time with the recipe I use for the electric one and it was fine. Here's what I used:

500ml UHT whole milk
large tin evaporated milk
natural yoghurt starter. (I usually put in about half a pot)
whisk it all together, makes a nice creamy yoghurt.

Cheers
Jen
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Postby Oddley » Mon May 24, 2010 11:25 am

Hi Jenny.
I was thinking of getting an electric one, but on reflection went for the nonelectric one because, I really don't like leaving things on while I'm asleep. The less electricity I use the better, smaller carbon footprint, plus less money on the bill.

Thanks for the recipe, I hadn't thought of using evaporated milk.
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Postby the chorizo kid » Tue Jun 01, 2010 5:50 pm

i tried phil's thermos method with excellent results. however, i spent 12 minutes microwaving the whole milk, because all recipes say it is necessary to heat milk to at least 180F to "prepare the proteins." I also spent another 15 minutes cooling it to 110F before pitching the starter. that was a boring half hour.

it seems the yoghurt making machines just call for adding the starter to the cold milk and then heating the whole thing at 110F for 6 hours [or more], to taste. this sounds a lot easier, but...

does this mean it is not really necessary to pre-heat the milk to at least 180F in order to "prepare the proteins?"

has anyone made great yoghurt [smooth, creamy, slightly sweet/tart] without the 180F pre-heat, no matter what the method??

is the 180F preheat critical?
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Postby wheels » Tue Jun 01, 2010 6:23 pm

I've always wondered that too - is the heating part just a leftover from days before pasteurised milk, or does it serve some other purpose?

Phil
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Postby Snags » Wed Jun 02, 2010 7:32 am

I just bought an electric one will give it a go when I make some room in the fridge.

I tried the putting it in an Esky (foam box),all i got was runny warm milk.

My mum used to just make it put it in glasses and then in a pot wrapped in a blanket worked everytime.(hers was thick and sour like I like it)
No thermometer just her finger.
I wish I paid more attention.
Saw a doco on a Greek yoghurt maker who put the yoghurt in what looked like cotton pillow cases with draw strings left them draining then jarred them up.
Looked good
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Postby the chorizo kid » Wed Jun 02, 2010 3:24 pm

actually, if one could do without the 180F heating then cooling process, this whole thing would be a lot easier.
i used phil's thermos method twice with excellent/perfect results. waaaay over the top. creamy but thick enough to hold up a teaspoon. tart with buttery/creamy sweetness as an aftertaste. the third time i took the actual bowl in which it had cooled to 110F, pitched the starter and set the bowl on a heating pad inside my bread rising chamber [turned onto "high," it reached a steady 114F believe it or not, according to my IR thermometer] for 8 hours for a perfect result.
i think i will just try to do this without the 180F pre-heat and see what happens. the recipe would be:
1 qt cold whole milk
add 2 TBLSP starter
mix
put plate on top of bowl
set bowl into covered dough-rising chamber [cloudy $8 plastic storage container fom sprawl mart]
place on top of heating pad set to high for 8 hours
cool in fridge

if i live, i'll report
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Postby the chorizo kid » Fri Jun 04, 2010 11:09 am

still healthy. no pre-heat. simply took cold whole milk and pitched starter. placed into covered bowl and set onto heating pad [temp about 114F]. after 6 hours into fridge overnight.
tart, very smooth, no hint of graininess or lumps, firm enough to hold a teaspoon straight upright. i would say i will no longer pre-heat, thereby saving myself about 1/2 hour per batch. also, if i wanted, i could use several empty large plastic yogurt/cottage cheese containers instead of a bowl. they would be convenient to cover and store.
still, the result was not quite as good as phil's method.
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