The Secret Of Peacock’s Saloon

All other recipes including your personal favourite and any seasonal tips to share

The Secret Of Peacock’s Saloon

Postby Chuckwagon » Fri Nov 27, 2009 4:02 am

The Secret Of Peacock’s Saloon

I’d like to dedicate a recipe to my pal Wallie of Newcastle Tyne & Wear, UK. He is a great guy and a member of this forum since November of 2006. Now, there’s a bit of history behind this Eastern Utah sheep dip… this terrifying tarantula’s tonsil twister. You see, at the turn of the last, past century, my ol' "Grampy" worked at the local lumber store in my hometown of Price, Utah - a few miles from the site where Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid robbed the Pleasant Valley Mine Payroll at Castle Gate in April of 1897. I always called my grandfather “Grampy”, and as a young man, he supplied cottonwood planks for the raised sidewalks along an unpaved, ol’ west main street then dotted with wild saloons and other assorted shady establishments down the side streets. Saddle tramps could always stumble upon a hot poker game, ‘paint his nose with antifogmatics”, or enthusiastically indulge in the horizontal hula or other certain time-consuming social activities with the painted cats of the evening. Illegal yes, nonetheless quite tolerated by the general population.

One local favorite thirst emporium was that of an Englishman, a Mr. Lloyd Peacock, whose specialty was preparing his famous "Tom And Jerry" spirited eggnog recipe, and it has been said that around the holidays, cowboys sopped up the stuff like dry sponges. During the summer of 1909, William “Gunplay” Maxwell, a twice-convicted bank robber, began planning a local mine payroll robbery. He claimed the last chair and a portion of the bar inside Peacock’s Saloon for his headquarters. Receiving an anonymous tip, coal company owners asked deputy sheriff Edward Black Johnstone to thwart the plan. It was generally known that the deputy had crossed paths with the outlaw previously and Johnstone had become Maxwell’s nemesis having testified against him in a court of law, following a bungled robbery. Some called him “Shoot ‘em up Bill”.

“Shoot ‘em up Bill” had no trouble locating Maxwell inside the old Saloon on the west side of Price’s Main Street. Maxwell’s verbal abuse could be heard along the sidewalk outside the building and soon both men were facing each other in the street. Within a matter of only moments, C. L. “Gunplay” Maxwell lay dying upon the ground. Firing twice, Johnstone thought he’d missed as the dirt churned up behind the outlaw. Then Maxwell, not even having removed his blue shooter from its holster, slumped to the dirt with two holes through his upper torso. Shoot ‘em up Bill had simply beat the man to the draw. The wives of the town’s fathers insisted the man’s body be buried outside the cemetery fence where “only decent folks were interred”. What happened to the old saloon? It remained virtually unchanged for decades and patrons could always stop by for a “Tom & Jerry” during the holidays. The place was remodeled in the mid 1970’s, although it is still a favorite waterin’ hole for local cowboys.

Somehow, ol' Grampy acquired Peacock's famous Tom & Jerry recipe, and I wouldn’t be surprised if he won it while betting holding an inside straight! Nonetheless, it soon became an annual holiday tradition for our extended family to gather at my grandparent’s farm just west of town, on the evening of the 23rd of December for some celebratory eggnog cheer. Of course, the children had the recipe without the spirits. Now, I’m sure Wallie will share his new recipe with the rest of this forum - just in time for the holidays!

"Tom And Jerry’s"
(Peacock's Saloon 110 -Year-Old Secret Egg Nog Recipe)

10 eggs
1 quart of milk
2 cups of sugar
cinnamon
nutmeg
rum and whiskey

Gradually, warm two cups of milk on the ol' wood stove then reserve it. Separate the eggs and beat the yolks together with two cups of sugar. Continue beating the mixture until it stiffens. Beat the egg whites separately and add one tablespoon of vanilla extract. Excluding the milk, fold (don’t stir), all the ingredients together until the mixture is smooth and stiff. Gradually add the hot milk until the mixture is smooth and creamy. Note the amount of milk necessary will depend upon the size of the eggs. Pour the mixture into mugs and add one jigger of whiskey and 1/2 jigger of rum to each. Stir slowly and sprinkle with ground nutmeg and cinnamon to taste. I like to use a little allspice in mine. Relax and enjoy Tom & Jerry’s with your family. Here’s to you, Wallie!

Best Wishes, Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, quacks like a duck, and walks like a duck, it probably needs a little more time on the grill.
Chuckwagon
Registered Member
 
Posts: 642
Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 4:14 am
Location: Rocky Mountains

Postby DanMcG » Fri Nov 27, 2009 9:11 am

Thanks for sharing the great story and the recipe Chuckwagon.
User avatar
DanMcG
Registered Member
 
Posts: 1290
Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2008 11:09 pm
Location: Central NY, USA

Postby NCPaul » Fri Nov 27, 2009 2:50 pm

I'll remember to do this on 12/23 in honor of you Chuckwagon. I'll have my whole family visiting and this will be perfect. I'll try to post a picture if I remember; apologies in advance for the blurry photo (I'm sure the camera will have focus problems). :D
Fashionably late will be stylishly hungry.
NCPaul
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2303
Joined: Thu Oct 01, 2009 12:58 am
Location: North Carolina

Postby wheels » Fri Nov 27, 2009 2:58 pm

CW - you ought to write a book of your stories and recipes.

Phil
User avatar
wheels
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 12176
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 4:29 pm
Location: Leicestershire, UK

Postby Chuckwagon » Sun Nov 29, 2009 6:09 am

Thanks Phil, I have. It took me 19 years to write it and it is going to the 2nd publisher soon. The original publisher tried to pull some naughties on the Internal Revenue Service and ended up in prison. I had to sue to get my manuscript back but was successful. It should be out sometime during the coming year. Its called "Cookin' Along The Outlaw Trail" and has all sorts of tales about the old outlaws in the area where I was sheriff for twenty years. This is the famous "Robber's Roost" area. The book has over 600 recipes for cooking in cast iron - the Dutch oven, grill, griddle, and the black skillet. One entire chapter is devoted to sausagemaking. When my book is published, I'll send you all copies! Then I'm sailing to England to hoist a few suds with you special folks. Good On Ya, Mates!
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, quacks like a duck, and walks like a duck, it probably needs a little more time on the grill.
Chuckwagon
Registered Member
 
Posts: 642
Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 4:14 am
Location: Rocky Mountains

Postby Chuckwagon » Sun Nov 29, 2009 6:15 am

Hi Dan McG and North Carolina Paul!
Thanks for your kind words. I hope you enjoy this "authentic recipe". Today is seems like everyone just buys their egg nog in a carton. The home made stuff is SOOoooo much better! I think you're in for a pleasant surprise. If you ever come west, please look me up.
Best wishes, Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, quacks like a duck, and walks like a duck, it probably needs a little more time on the grill.
Chuckwagon
Registered Member
 
Posts: 642
Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 4:14 am
Location: Rocky Mountains

Postby wheels » Sun Nov 29, 2009 10:15 am

I think I speak for everyone when I say that we look forward to reading it.

Phil
User avatar
wheels
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 12176
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 4:29 pm
Location: Leicestershire, UK

Postby culinairezaken » Sun Nov 29, 2009 10:40 am

sounds really nice CW! the book is not yet out and you can already expect international orders! good luck
User avatar
culinairezaken
Registered Member
 
Posts: 176
Joined: Sat Oct 03, 2009 8:33 am
Location: Haren, The Netherlands

Postby jenny_haddow » Sun Nov 29, 2009 3:11 pm

Certainly looking forward to reading your book CW. If it's anywhere near as entertaining and informative as your posts on the forum it will be a darned good read.

I sometimes make a dish of briskett of beef cooked in coffee (I think I posted the recipe here somewhere). Anyway, I was told it originated on the long trails and cattle drives in the US when water had to be conserved, so the cook would pour the remains of any coffee into the beef stew so as not to waste precious water. Have you heard of this CW?

Cheers

Jen
User avatar
jenny_haddow
Registered Member
 
Posts: 1320
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2006 7:54 am
Location: Cambridgeshire and France

Postby DanMcG » Sun Nov 29, 2009 9:09 pm

jenny_haddow wrote:Certainly looking forward to reading your book CW. If it's anywhere near as entertaining and informative as your posts on the forum it will be a darned good read.


I couldn't agree more!
And watch out for what ya wish for CW, my outlaws are in Grand Juction Co. and although I haven't been there yet, if forced to go I could easily venture over to your place to spend the week or two.
Dan
User avatar
DanMcG
Registered Member
 
Posts: 1290
Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2008 11:09 pm
Location: Central NY, USA

Postby beardedwonder5 » Mon Nov 30, 2009 3:26 pm

Dear Chuckwagon,
Am I correct in assuming that your authoritative tome can, by special order, be supplied bound in GENUWINE Utah cougar leather?

On the subject of your book, do you use Lodge?

Yours in kewlinearities.

Beardedwonder5

P.s., my wife on occasion threatens one by one tie my stach hairs to those sprouting from my lower chin. So I have to keep those supereuchemical shears in use.
GOS, yeah!!!
beardedwonder5
Registered Member
 
Posts: 342
Joined: Thu Feb 28, 2008 10:21 am
Location: Canterbury, Kent, UK

Postby culinairezaken » Mon Nov 30, 2009 4:05 pm

CW, is there a release date for your book?
Reality is a hallucination caused by a lack of alcohol!
User avatar
culinairezaken
Registered Member
 
Posts: 176
Joined: Sat Oct 03, 2009 8:33 am
Location: Haren, The Netherlands

Postby Chuckwagon » Mon Nov 30, 2009 10:28 pm

Wow! Thanks folks. I’m a bit overwhelmed and taken aback right now with gratitude. What a blessing it is to have such fine friends. I can’t thank you enough for your friendship and support. No publishing date as yet (more editing), but if they read more comments like yours, they may just move it up! This will be my third book. I'm going to dedicate it to the members of this forum. What a gang! This is a truly unique forum and board. Its more like a brotherhood of real camaraderie. Thank you!
Best wishes, Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, quacks like a duck, and walks like a duck, it probably needs a little more time on the grill.
Chuckwagon
Registered Member
 
Posts: 642
Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 4:14 am
Location: Rocky Mountains

Postby DanMcG » Mon Nov 30, 2009 11:16 pm

Chuckwagon wrote:This will be my third book.


Would you care to share the names of the first two Books CW? I have to admit I don't read a lot, but I like your style and they got to be good and would love to check them out.
User avatar
DanMcG
Registered Member
 
Posts: 1290
Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2008 11:09 pm
Location: Central NY, USA

Postby coastie » Tue Dec 01, 2009 10:24 pm

I Cw can we have the names of the books please and the ISBN numbers
Coastie
coastie
Registered Member
 
Posts: 65
Joined: Sun Sep 13, 2009 4:13 pm
Location: Whitby Yorkshire

Next

Return to Cookery in general

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest