Ridiculous Pasty recipe.

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Ridiculous Pasty recipe.

Postby Ianinfrance » Sun Feb 14, 2010 11:19 am

When I first read this recipe, I found it looked so ridiculous, that I reckoned I HAD to try it. The reasons I'm posting it here now are three fold.
1. It's ridiculously good.
2. It's in season (Butternuts are coming to the end but still available)
3. It uses left over parma style ham - which many of us will have. I find that after slicing most of the usable ham from prosciutto crudo I tend to have a bit left over that's not really tidy enough to slice paper thin. This is a perfect use for it, but it could be made with any uncooked cured pork, offcuts or not.

We tend to make this using home made pastry and cutting into relatively small pasties, using circles about 10-12 cms across, 2 of which make a good lunchtime meal. Made in decent sized batches, it can be cooked and then frozen and reheats perfectly.

@@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

Butternut Squash And Gruyere Pasties

british, main dish, meats, pastry, vegetables

1 tablespoon light olive oil
125 g serrano ham; cubed 5mm (or other prosciutto crudo)
2 tablespoon fresh sage; sliced or chopped
225 g butternut squash; 1 cm cubes
1 medium onion; very finely sliced
140 g gruyère, grated
3 tablespoon double cream
750 g short-crust pastry
1 free-range egg
salt
freshly ground white pepper
Shortcrust pastry as needed.

1. Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F)

2. Heat the olive oil in a frying pan. Fry the ham until it begins to turn crispy. Add the sage and toss quickly. Tip on to a plate lined with kitchen paper.

3. Make the filling by mixing the butternut squash, onion, cheese, crispy ham and sage. Season generously with salt and freshly ground white pepper and then mix thoroughly with the cream.

4. Place one sheet of pastry onto a floured board. Take a plate large enough to cut out 2 circles from the pasty. You can also just divide into two to make a triangle pasty.

5. Whisk the egg up and add a teaspoon of water to make egg wash.

6. Place a quarter of the mixture onto one half of the pastry. Brush the inside edges with some egg wash, then carefully close to from a purse shape. Using a fork gently crimp the edges. Brush the top with more of the egg wash and place on a baking tray. Repeat the process to make the remaining three.

7. Place in the oven for ten minutes. Then reduce the temperature to
180°C/350°F/Gas 4 and cook for a further 25 to 30 minutes when the pastry
will be golden brown and the pasties cooked through.

8. Serve hot or at room temperature.

Yield: 4 servings

** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.86 **



Ridiculous. In fact we make this using Comté cheese, because it's easier to find here in France.
All the best - Ian
"The Earth is degenerating today. Bribery and corruption abound. Children no longer obey their parents, every man wants to write a book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching." c. 2800 BC
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Postby wheels » Sun Feb 14, 2010 2:44 pm

That's one for my recipe file - thanks Ian.

Phil
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Postby mitchamus » Tue Feb 16, 2010 9:50 pm

wheels wrote:That's one for my recipe file - thanks Ian.


Ditto. thanks for that, can't wait to try it.
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Postby Ianinfrance » Tue Feb 16, 2010 11:59 pm

Thanks you two.

Kind words.

As it happened, we had some more today. It was "the" day. ½ Charles got cut up into bits so we were working out butts off, a perfect occasion to hoick three pasties out of the freezer, thaw them quickly in the microwave, and then crisp them up in the oven. They were as yummy as ever.

Charles was the hog that Marielle has been raising for us and who gave his all on Saturday. So we cut up our half today and made:- 8 kg of gammon joints (from the shoulder, because the leg goes to make raw ham). 7 kg of streaky bacon, 20 chops, 4 kg of sausages, and 7½ kg (30 tins) of pâté de campagne. Various bits are in brine to make petit salé, Phew. Tomorrow it's thai red duck curry for our friends who run the village auberge, and Thursday we're off to Brest to pig out on shellfish. Life can be so hard.
All the best - Ian
"The Earth is degenerating today. Bribery and corruption abound. Children no longer obey their parents, every man wants to write a book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching." c. 2800 BC
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Postby wheels » Wed Feb 17, 2010 12:15 am

Ian

If you tire of such a hard life, just remember - you could be back here!

I'd love to see some photos of what you've made - any chance?

Phil
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Postby mitchamus » Wed Feb 17, 2010 1:14 am

wow! 7kg of streaky...

that's a big belly!
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Postby Snags » Sat Apr 03, 2010 3:45 am

Just made a few pasties.
Image

Bought flakey pastry
1 Swede
1 onion
3 potatoes
1 Carrot
Handful of peas
Heaps of pepper and some salt
Tablespoon of potato flour
.5 kilo of blade steak (no fat)

Chop everything into little cubes
Brown the meat slightly in a bit of oil
and microwave the veg until tender (except peas)
When cool mix together adjust for salt and pepper add potato flour and peas,then make pasties.
Brush with milk
Cook until golden
For me it was 10 min at 250C and 15 at 160C,fan forced electric oven.

Its not totally traditional but I am Australian not Cornish :D
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Postby saucisson » Sun Apr 04, 2010 2:11 pm

I've just eaten a full Sunday roast and I still want one of those :lol:
Curing is not an exact science... So it's not a sin to bin.

Great hams, from little acorns grow...
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Postby Ianinfrance » Sun Apr 04, 2010 3:30 pm

Hi Phil
wheels wrote:Ian

If you tire of such a hard life, just remember - you could be back here!

I'd love to see some photos of what you've made - any chance?

Phil


For some reason, this is the first time I've seen this thread shown as having new posts. Sorry not to have answered before.

Yes it WAS a big belly, I hardly dare show the cross section of the bacon! Wonderful stuff, a real "baconer".

As for photos, Phil. When next we heat some up, I'll ask Jacquie to take a snap with her camera for us and I'll post a pic.

I'm afraid I'm not keen on very traditional cornish pasties, because I have an unreasoning horror of swedes (the vegetables variety - I hasten to add).
All the best - Ian
"The Earth is degenerating today. Bribery and corruption abound. Children no longer obey their parents, every man wants to write a book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching." c. 2800 BC
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Postby wheels » Sun Apr 04, 2010 5:47 pm

I love it when I can get half a baconer. Unfortunately, they're few and far between as the farmers almost have to beg the abattoir to process them - it appears that their 'de-hairing' machines aren't up to the job when it comes to very large pigs.

Phil
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Postby Ianinfrance » Mon Apr 05, 2010 8:55 am

wheels wrote:I love it when I can get half a baconer. Unfortunately, they're few and far between as the farmers almost have to beg the abattoir to process them - it appears that their 'de-hairing' machines aren't up to the job when it comes to very large pigs.
Phil


That's sad, isn't it. Creeping homogenisation is a particular bête-noire of mine.

That's an advantage of living in an area where there's a lot of small farmers, and a healthy disregard of silly legislation. When Charles gave his all in February, the local butcher came round, he stunned him with a captive bolt pistol in situ, before he had any suspicion he was to meet his end - in fact he was too busy complaining about the cold and the brightness of the day. We strung him up and bled him as usual, and then the butcher used a blooming great blow torch to de-hair him. So there was no problem with the abattoir.

I've asked SWMBO nicely, and we're having more pasties for lunch and she will try to remember to take a snap or two. I might also photograph the sinful streaky at the same time.
All the best - Ian
"The Earth is degenerating today. Bribery and corruption abound. Children no longer obey their parents, every man wants to write a book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching." c. 2800 BC
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Postby Ianinfrance » Mon Apr 05, 2010 1:07 pm

Well here they are!

Three photos. Two of the pasties

Image

Image

And the Streaky

Image
All the best - Ian
"The Earth is degenerating today. Bribery and corruption abound. Children no longer obey their parents, every man wants to write a book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching." c. 2800 BC
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Postby wheels » Mon Apr 05, 2010 2:56 pm

Do you mind, I'm starving!

They both look great.

Phil
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Postby porker » Mon Apr 05, 2010 3:47 pm

Great looking pasties and you certainly need back fat like that! I see the latest health news is saying that its not sat fat that has been killing us after all ... but the amount of refined sugar we consume!

I've a great notion of a pasty machine, but I'm sure the ones at under 20 GBP for a set of three are not really up to much and a Hunt machine is into hundreds :shock: as yet I haven't managed to find anything in between.

Cheers

:)
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Postby Ianinfrance » Mon Apr 05, 2010 5:12 pm

Hi Phil

So sorry. (he said smirking in a self satisfied way) By the way we're trying a chunk off the first of the gammons we smoked a couple of weeks ago tonight. I can't wait.

porker wrote:Great looking pasties and you certainly need back fat like that! <snippety>

I've a great notion of a pasty machine, but I'm sure the ones at under 20 GBP for a set of three are not really up to much


Porker... that's not fat, that's real bacon. Wrap that round a scallop and grill it and you've just discovered just how good "surf and turf" can be. Stuff the old carpetbag steaks. (well... of course).

By the way, that's exactly what we use, the 3 pack in varying sizes for peanuts. They work fine, though they do tend to break when thrown onto a tiled floor. You have to be a little careful as you learn to use them, but heck, even if you sort of screw up, the results are yummy.
All the best - Ian
"The Earth is degenerating today. Bribery and corruption abound. Children no longer obey their parents, every man wants to write a book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching." c. 2800 BC
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