Split Yellow Mustard Seeds

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Split Yellow Mustard Seeds

Postby Mike D » Sat Jul 03, 2010 10:15 am

I have a large bag of split yellow mustard seeds, which I picked up from an Indian Supermarket. My thought was to make an "English" style mustard with them. I can whizz them up in the spice grinder to make a fine powder, but would be grateful if someone could suggest what I do when I have made the powder.

I know I could just Google it, but I do trust the judgement of the forum members as I have used various other methods and recipes posted on here and all have been superb.
Cheers,


Mike
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Postby grisell » Sat Jul 03, 2010 11:29 am

Please someone correct me should I be wrong here:

The traditional English mustard is powderized yellow mustard mixed with only water. It's extremely hot.

American mustard includes vinegar and often some turmeric, but no sugar.

French mustard (Dijon-style) is very finely ground and includes wine vinegar, wine but no sugar. The à l'Ancienne mustard has the same seasoning, but is coarser ground. There are also varieties that include a range of seasonings, like Champagne, tarragon and garlic.

Russian mustard is like the English, but can also contain black mustard. It's coarser ground and unsweetened (or very lightly sweetened) but has a small amount of distilled vinegar. Very hot, but not as hot as the English. A personal favorite; unfortunately hard to find outside Russia.

German mustard is often sweetened and could be hot or mild. The same goes for Swedish mustard, that unfortunately can be exceedingly sweet and bland.

There is, however, a mustard from southern Sweden (Skåne, Scania) that includes only freshly ground black mustard seeds and water (extremely hot!). As with the English mustard mentioned above, it isn't available commercially (not in its original state), because the aroma is so volatile. It has to be freshly ground.

I posted some mustard recipes here a few weeks ago:

http://forum.sausagemaking.org/viewtopic.php?t=6625

- you might want to try them now that you seem to be well suppiled. :D
André

I have a simple taste - I'm always satisfied with the best.
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Postby wheels » Sat Jul 03, 2010 1:09 pm

There are further recipes here:

http://forum.sausagemaking.org/viewtopi ... rd&start=0

http://forum.sausagemaking.org/viewtopi ... ht=mustard

and here:

http://forum.sausagemaking.org/viewtopi ... ht=mustard

and my take on an American 'ball park' mustard here:

http://www.localfoodheroes.co.uk/weblog ... =my_weblog

I've got a load more somewhere if you run out!

Phil
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Postby Mike D » Sat Jul 03, 2010 2:21 pm

Thanks Grisell & Phil... plenty for me to be going at there! I'll report back when I have made some.
Cheers,


Mike
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