Making Jam

All other recipes including your personal favourite and any seasonal tips to share

Postby mitchamus » Thu Nov 04, 2010 12:26 am

Hi john,

I prefer the taste of 'fridge' jams, which have about half the sugar of a regular jam, and so must be kept in the fridge.

I find the taste if the fruit comes through more...

Just my 2 cents...
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Postby Snags » Thu Nov 04, 2010 12:36 pm

I remember seeing an old French recipe for a an uncooked(or low temperature Cant totally remember) raspberry jam it had vodka in it to stop it going off and much less sugar.

Give me some time and if I find the book I will post it up.

in the mean time

Go down to Aldi and buy the 100% fruit sour cherry jam
Ive never tasted better.
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Postby johnfb » Thu Nov 04, 2010 5:57 pm

So I made the jam today. My local supermarket was selling off 300grm packs of strawberries for €3 each.
I bought 2 of them and a kilo of Jam Sugar.
15 minutes later...perfect jam. I am really happy with the results too.

The cost here of a high quality strawberry jam is €2.99. So overall I make my jam at a cost of €7.79 and the same would have cost €9 off the shelf.

Small saving...huge satisfaction, all the family loved it and I know what is in it.

John
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Postby johnfb » Sun Nov 21, 2010 1:07 pm

Here are the results of my labours:

Image


Jumbleberry Jam
Strawberry Jam
Pumpkin Chtuney
Kasundi
Raspberry Jam
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Postby wheels » Sun Nov 21, 2010 1:42 pm

Blimey John, you've been busy. Love the name Jumbleberry!

...and thanks to Google I now know what Kasundi is!

Can you post the pumpkin and Kasundi recipes please.

Phil
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Postby johnfb » Sun Nov 21, 2010 5:56 pm

Yeah, made a good lot of each, very happy with the results.

Pumpkin Recipe:

2lb (900 g) pumpkin, peeled and chopped
1 1b  (450 g) tomatoes, peeled and chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 pint (570 ml) white vinegar
1 ½ teaspoons allspice berries
1 ½ teaspoons white peppercorns
11b (450 g) onion, peeled and sliced
1 ½  lbs (675 g)  brown sugar
1 ½ tablespoons salt
1 ½ teaspoons ground ginger
1 ½ teaspoons of black peppercorns

Method:

Place the chopped pumpkin in a pan and cover with vinegar, add the sliced onions, chopped garlic and chopped tomatoes.
Crush the allspice and peppercorns, add both to the pan then stir thoroughly and leave for about 1 hour.
Add the ginger, salt and sugar to the mixture and bring it to the boil slowly.
Simmer for about 45 minutes, stirring occasionally and taking care that the consistency does not get too much like that of jam.
Allow the chutney to cool, pour it into clean jars, cover and store.

This recipe originally appeared in the National Vegetable Society Bulletin




Kasundi Recipe (from my good friend Indian food author Kris Dhillon...yes name dropping and I don't care)


Kasundi
Cook time: 2-3 hrs on High 4-6 hrs on Low
Spice Mix
1 ½ tbsp yellow mustard seeds
1 tbsp fenugreek seeds
1 tbsp black cumin seeds
2 tsp fennel seeds
2 tsp ground cumin
2 tbsp turmeric
1 tbsp chilli powder
============================================================

10 large cloves garlic, roughly chopped
3 x thumb sized pieces of ginger, roughly chopped
6 hot green or red chillies, roughly chopped
1.5kg Roma style tomatoes, chopped
400ml malt vinegar
200ml olive or sunflower oil
½ cup grated palm or soft brown sugar 110 grams
1 tbsp salt
Process garlic, ginger and chillies until finely chopped. Place half the chopped tomatoes in food processor or blender, add about half the vinegar and process until fairly smooth. Repeat with remaining tomato and vinegar.
Heat the oil in a wok or large pan until very hot but not smoking. Turn the heat down a little and add the spice mix. Cook stirring for about 2 minutes until mixture darkens a little and becomes deeply aromatic. Take care not to burn it or it will become bitter.
Add the garlic and ginger mixture and stir fry over medium to high heat for about a minute and a half or until aromatic.
Add processed tomato, sugar and salt and stir until sugar dissolves. Bring to the boil and simmer for 2 or 3 minutes. Foam will form at the surface. Skim this off and discard. Don’t worry if you don’t get it all.
Transfer mixture carefully to slow cooker, cover and switch on. Stir half way through cooking.
Kasundi is ready when it develops a jam like appearance and the oil rises to the top.
The kasundi will keep in the fridge for up to 4 weeks or indefinitely if transferred whilst still hot to sterilised jars and sealed.
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Postby johnfb » Sun Nov 21, 2010 5:58 pm

Ohh, by the way, for the Jumbleberry Jam I bought a bag of frozen mixed summer berries in Lidl, very cheap too.
Thawed out and made the jam.
John
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Postby grisell » Sun Nov 21, 2010 6:05 pm

That Kasundi sounds great! What's it used for?
André

I have a simple taste - I'm always satisfied with the best.
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Postby johnfb » Sun Nov 21, 2010 6:17 pm

Hi Andre


In India this dish would be served in much the same manner as all Indian pickles; that is as an accompaniment to the main dish with naan or paratha bread. Fortunately, tomato kasundi has many uses in the kitchen.Try adding it to a pot full of fresh mussels or clams, with a dash of fish stock and a handful of raw couscous. It makes a sensational partner for a piece of grilled fish or chicken, just add a wedge of lemon or lime. Believe it or not - it is also wonderful in sandwiches.
Taken from google

Hope this helps. I eat it with poppadoms or add a tablespoon in curries.

Cheers

John
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Postby cath61 » Sun Nov 21, 2010 6:47 pm

I made some chutneys last month but looking at this thread has inspired to do a few more :)

Might have to go the market last thing next saturday and see what they are selling off cheap and then spend all day Sunday cooking!!!!

I will let you know how it goes - Thanks for the inspiration!!!!!

Cath
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Postby johnfb » Sun Nov 21, 2010 6:53 pm

Hi Cath
I would love to see your results and please post any recipes you may have I am trying lots of types now and am looking for any new ones.

Cheers
JOhn
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Postby wheels » Sun Nov 21, 2010 7:58 pm

Thanks for the recipes John, I've got a couple of pumpkins in the kitchen at the moment.

Phil
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