Broiled Steak Tartare

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Broiled Steak Tartare

Postby grisell » Mon Apr 11, 2011 8:40 am

This is the way it's often served here in Sweden. Many people would argue that broiling a steak tartare is a sacrilege, but it's actually delicious. The grilling process is so quick that the meat remains completely raw inside. The typical garnish is parsley butter (butter, parsley, lemon, Worcestershire sauce) and french fries. The steak tartare is freshly ground, well-trimmed beef (round, tenderloin or flank). It's mixed with a discrete amount of egg yolk, finely chopped onion and capers. Seasoned with Dijon mustard, salt and pepper. Shaped into a high burger, brushed with oil and quickly grilled on both sides. Served on a hot plate.

Very tasty, nutritious (except for the butter and fries) and easy to digest.

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Postby Ruralidle » Wed Apr 13, 2011 11:37 am

Sorry Andre but Steak Tartare should always be totally raw, with a raw egg yolk on top.
Last edited by Ruralidle on Wed Apr 13, 2011 12:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby grisell » Wed Apr 13, 2011 11:57 am

Ruralidle wrote:Soory Andre but Steak Tartare should always be totally raw, with a raw egg yolk on top.


I know. :oops: I love that, but I like it this way too.
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Postby Big Guy » Wed Apr 13, 2011 12:13 pm

We call that a hamburger
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Postby schlafsack » Wed Apr 13, 2011 3:10 pm

The burgers in the Hawksmore restaurant here in Covent Garden serve their burgers in pretty much a simlimar way. Ground beef mixed with chopped bone marrow, seared on the outside, served in a bun.
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Postby grisell » Wed Apr 13, 2011 4:16 pm

Big Guy wrote:We call that a hamburger


I understand your point, but hamburgers are normally more or less cooked through, right? At least I think a customer would complain if his hamburger was raw and ice cold inside. This one is only cooked to a few millimeters on the outside, and the mix contains egg yolks and capers that are typical for a Steak Tartare. According to Wikipedia, "Although less common than the completely raw variety, there is a French version of steak tartare called tartare aller-retour. It is a mound of mostly raw steak tartare that is lightly seared on one side of the patty.", so this variety seems to fall under the commonly accepted designation of steak tartare too.
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Postby wheels » Wed Apr 13, 2011 4:25 pm

That's true. If you cooked it through I imagine it would be very dry (and almost sacrilege!).

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Postby Vindii » Wed Apr 13, 2011 4:47 pm

grisell wrote:
Big Guy wrote:We call that a hamburger


I understand your point, but hamburgers are normally more or less cooked through, right? At least I think a customer would complain if his hamburger was raw and ice cold inside. This one is only cooked to a few millimeters on the outside, and the mix contains egg yolks and capers that are typical for a Steak Tartare. According to Wikipedia, "Although less common than the completely raw variety, there is a French version of steak tartare called tartare aller-retour. It is a mound of mostly raw steak tartare that is lightly seared on one side of the patty.", so this variety seems to fall under the commonly accepted designation of steak tartare too.


Around here we cook burger to a med/ med-raw depending on how people like them. I dont like well done burgers.

Most here would not want a burger that was raw inside or ice cold.
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Postby grisell » Wed Apr 13, 2011 5:02 pm

wheels wrote:That's true. If you cooked it through I imagine it would be very dry (and almost sacrilege!).

Phil


True. My wife doesn't eat meat that's too raw, so I once tried to cook through one of these. Because it was so lean, it turned out dry as dust. :(

vindii wrote: Around here we cook burger to a med/ med-raw depending on how people like them. I dont like well done burgers. [---]


I agree, but it requires top-quality freshly minced meat, and most restaurants here in Sweden don't mince their own meat, so they won't serve it other than well-done. :(
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Postby Ianinfrance » Wed Apr 13, 2011 5:17 pm

Hi André
grisell wrote:
Big Guy wrote:We call that a hamburger


I understand your point, but hamburgers are normally more or less cooked through, right?.
Only commercially. If I couldn't leave my hamburgers well bloody inside, I'd not cook them. This is an e-coli thing and if you buy decent meat and trim it before mincing (grinding) it, there's no reason not to "just walk it across the grill".

Both are delicious. I agree,

PS, just seen your second post. If a restaurant doesn't mince their own meat, you shouldn't be eating there. (He said severely)
All the best - Ian
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Postby Vindii » Wed Apr 13, 2011 6:38 pm

I doubt most restaurant in the US grind there own meat. I don't know for sure but I doubt it.

We eat ground sirloin raw on rye bread with onions all the time. Some people wont touch it but our family has been doing it since I can remember.

No point really. Just saying.
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