Phall Curry

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Phall Curry

Postby grisell » Sat May 28, 2011 10:39 am

Phall Curry is the hottest of all Indian curries. Actually, it is not Indian. It is said to have been invented by Indian restaurateurs in England in the 70s. They were tired of gangs of drunk guys that came in to the restaurants after the pub closed at 11 pm and often abused the staff. The usual way to show ones masculinity was to order the hottest dish on the menu and show that one could eat it. Thus, the Phall Curry was born as a revenge from the staff, although it most probably never emerged on any menu. Phall stems from the word Phallos.

Obviously, there is no official recipe. Here is my version.

For two servings, fry 400 g lamb till brown. Set aside.

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In a pot, fry one finely chopped onion in vegetable oil until brown. During the last minute, add 8 chopped cloves of garlic and a piece of grated ginger. Then add half a jar of curry paste (you could make your own, but a pre-made will do in this dish) and 2-3 heaped tablespoons of hot crushed chili. Stir.

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Add the pre-cooked meat, a couple of chopped tomatoes, a bay leaf, a spoonful of tomato purée and a little water. Also, add some potato in chunks. Salt.

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Let simmer until the potato is soft (about 40-60 minutes). By then, the meat should be tender too.

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Chop a handful of hot green chili peppers. Add to the pot together with a spoonful of yoghurt to thicken.
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Garnish with slices of Habañero chili and serve with rice.

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NOTE: In retrospect, I should have added more chili since the dish was edible without too much effort. I think the purpose of this dish is to cause pain, but then chili tolerance is individual. :wink:
André

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Postby Massimo Maddaloni » Sat May 28, 2011 5:08 pm

Are you trying to telling us that you ACTUALLY chewed and ate all the habanero?!
Gee, if you did it, either the Swedish habanero is not up to snuff or you must be tougher than nails.
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Postby grisell » Sat May 28, 2011 5:40 pm

Oh, that's real habanero, I can assure you. I think it's grown in Holland, but I've eaten habanero in Texas and this is of the same calibre. Well, I didn't eat them separately. After taking the photo, I stirred them down and ate them with the rest. I hardly perceived them since the stew itself was so hot. But I'm known among friends to have a particularly high chili tolerance. 8)
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Postby grisell » Sat May 28, 2011 5:54 pm

BTW, the hottest dish I've ever eaten was one that my ex-girlfriend from Northern Thailand made for me. She was an excellent cook. The dish is called Som Tam Isan and is a salad of mainly unripe papaya, chili, lime juice and fermented fish. I once asked her to make it the way it's made in her home region (near the Laos border). She replied that I wouldn't be able to eat it - not even people from Southern Thailand can eat it that way, she said.

Anyway, she mixed roughly equal amounts of shredded papaya and chopped red birds-eye chilis (the very small ones that can be found in Asian groceries), pounded it all together in a big mortar, added a tablespoon of fermented fish (smells horrible but tastes good!), some lime juice and salt. Done!

It was of course only a side dish on a buffet. The way to eat it was to take a teaspoon or so together with a mouthful of rice. When I tried it, I could feel my own blood circulation! :shock: I could actually feel the blood flowing through my veins, into the heart, and out again! Amidst all of this fire, though, there was balance between the flavours like salt, sour etc. It was a real dish, and a successful one. Since then, I've tried many times to duplicate this salad but never succeeded. It always ends up with something that is only hot and lacks the fantastic flavours she presented me with.
André

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Postby johnfb » Sat May 28, 2011 8:49 pm

If you want the authentic taste of a British Indian Restaurant curry check out my blog. The recipe for their curry sauce is there along with some BIR recipes and videos on how to cook them.

I have the actual recipe for proper take away phall curry if you would like it.
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Postby grisell » Sat May 28, 2011 11:57 pm

johnfb wrote:If you want the authentic taste of a British Indian Restaurant curry check out my blog. The recipe for their curry sauce is there along with some BIR recipes and videos on how to cook them.


Very nice! :D

johnfb wrote:I have the actual recipe for proper take away phall curry if you would like it.


Yes, please. Pm me?
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Postby johnfb » Sun May 29, 2011 7:24 am

Will do, I will fish it out and PM you the recipe...would you like some others too?

John
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Postby grisell » Sun May 29, 2011 7:39 am

Anything Indian is highly appreciated. Good Indian cookbooks are impossible to find here. My mother bought one in London some 30 years ago. She keeps it like a treasure and won't lend it to me. :(
André

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Postby wheels » Sun May 29, 2011 3:35 pm

Grisell

Are you after Indian restaurant recipes or Indian home-cooking ones?

Phil
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Postby grisell » Sun May 29, 2011 5:20 pm

Oh, I have a bunch of recipes that johnfb just gave me. I have to try those first. Thanks anyway! :)
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Postby kimgary » Sun May 29, 2011 5:35 pm

Hi Johnfb,

Yes please too for the Phal recipe, I have your bir pdf.

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Postby johnfb » Sun May 29, 2011 7:00 pm

wheels wrote:Grisell

Are you after Indian restaurant recipes or Indian home-cooking ones?

Phil


Yeah, Phil, this is an important question as they are two completely separate things.

For home style buy yourself any Madhur Jarrey book...I use these when making more complex curries.
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Postby wheels » Sun May 29, 2011 7:07 pm

I was also going to suggest Madhur Jaffrey .

Phil :D
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Postby johnfb » Sun May 29, 2011 7:14 pm

wheels wrote:I was also going to suggest Madhur Jaffrey .

Phil :D



I have most of her books, Phil and find she cannot be beaten for that subtle home made type of curry. Her curries are usually not made up in 5 - 10 minutes, as my takeaway ones would.... and they show that in the final result, plus she uses far more ingredients than a takeaway ever would, hence the difference.
I do find her recipe for Madras to be the best and always make it her way.

For home style she is the best.
Last edited by johnfb on Sun May 29, 2011 7:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby grisell » Sun May 29, 2011 7:15 pm

I do have her "Indian Cookery" in a Swedish translation. I've tried most of the recipes in that book, and they are all good.
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