Mexican or Spanish chorizo?

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Mexican or Spanish chorizo?

Postby am153hrs » Fri Jan 27, 2012 8:01 pm

I just bought a bag of lovely Mexican chorizo from http://www.britmex.com

And noticed is different to the Spanish chorizo. Do you guys know how can I make the Spanish chorizo into the texture of Mexican chorizo? It seems to be more crumbly.

Many thanks
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Postby salumi512 » Fri Jan 27, 2012 8:27 pm

They are completely different in just about every way. Mexican chorizo is a fresh sausage while the Spanish chorizo is a dried sausage. You can make Mexican chorizo in about 10 minutes with some spices and vinegar. Recipes are easy to find online. You don't even need casing since it is not usually cooked in the casing.
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Postby solaryellow » Fri Jan 27, 2012 11:51 pm

salumi512 wrote:They are completely different in just about every way. Mexican chorizo is a fresh sausage while the Spanish chorizo is a dried sausage. You can make Mexican chorizo in about 10 minutes with some spices and vinegar. Recipes are easy to find online. You don't even need casing since it is not usually cooked in the casing.


x2 They are completely different.
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Postby wheels » Sat Jan 28, 2012 12:31 am

am153hrs

Welcome. :D :D

x3 that they are different!

You could adapt a Spanish Chorizo recipe into a fresh sausage to make it 'sort of' like a Mexican one if you wanted to. Although why you would want to eludes me!

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Postby vagreys » Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:30 am

Two key elements that make the texture of the Mexican chorizo what it is are the high fat content and the acidity of the vinegar. These make the Mexican chorizo crumbly and easy to break apart, but they also have significant flavor elements that would make it very difficult to achieve a Spanish chorizo flavor. Spanish chorizo has less fat and less acid, though some DO incorporate a little vinegar or wine. If you want it to be crumbly, but not excessively fatty, then you could season a normal, fresh, bulk sausage with a Spanish chorizo blend of seasonings to make a sausage that tastes like Spanish chorizo but that you could crumble and fry.
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Postby Greyham » Sat Feb 04, 2012 8:18 pm

Vagreys is correct on the mexican chorizo in that the crumbliness is due to the red wine vinegar.
However, the other main difference between the two are as follows.
All spanish chorizo wether fresh or dried are all based around Paprika. sweet, smoked or spicy.
Mexican chorizo spices are based around cumin, coriander, chilli, cayenne and some paprika. also vinegar for crumbliness.
I make both a fresh mexican chorizo burger (also lightly cured) and a fresh chorizo sausage. The later does contain cure 2# and many of my customers either eat it fresh or cure it themselves. never has it been so popular. DIY chorizo, sold at £18/k whilst fresh
The other ingredient useful in chorizo making is citric acid i find.
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Postby wheels » Sat Feb 04, 2012 8:45 pm

£18/kg Phew, I'm glad I make my own! Looking online that's not expensive though, is it? I didn't realise how out of touch with prices I was.

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Postby chix-boy » Sat Feb 04, 2012 11:48 pm

Welcome I just made Spanish Chorizo, Due to my controllor DOA on my curing chamber and meat was thawing, I made fresh and finised off in my smoker. I may never want to eat Mexican Chorizo again.
You know there might, I say there just might be a market for bottled duck
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Postby wheels » Sun Feb 05, 2012 12:30 am

As the great man (homer) himself said: Doh!
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Postby solaryellow » Sun Feb 05, 2012 12:37 am

chix-boy wrote:Welcome I just made Spanish Chorizo, Due to my controllor DOA on my curing chamber and meat was thawing, I made fresh and finised off in my smoker. I may never want to eat Mexican Chorizo again.


I think each have their place. I can't see enjoying spanish chorizo with my eggs or nachos nearly as much as I enjoy mexican chorizo with them. :D
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Postby salumi512 » Sun Feb 05, 2012 2:07 am

It's unfortunate that they are both called chorizo. It's like comparing American and Canadian bacon.
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Postby BriCan » Mon Feb 06, 2012 3:23 pm

salumi512 wrote:It's unfortunate that they are both called chorizo. It's like comparing American and Canadian bacon.

There is no such thing up ear as Canadian bacon, it's an American thing :lol: we just call it bacon :roll:
But what do I know
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Postby salumi512 » Mon Feb 06, 2012 5:45 pm

BriCan wrote:
salumi512 wrote:It's unfortunate that they are both called chorizo. It's like comparing American and Canadian bacon.

There is no such thing up ear as Canadian bacon, it's an American thing :lol: we just call it bacon :roll:


That's pretty obvious. I'm sure they don't call it Mexican Chorizo in Mexico either.
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Postby Vindii » Mon Feb 06, 2012 6:47 pm

salumi512 wrote:
BriCan wrote:
salumi512 wrote:It's unfortunate that they are both called chorizo. It's like comparing American and Canadian bacon.

There is no such thing up ear as Canadian bacon, it's an American thing :lol: we just call it bacon :roll:


That's pretty obvious. I'm sure they don't call it Mexican Chorizo in Mexico either.


:lol: :lol: :lol:
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Postby vagreys » Mon Feb 06, 2012 7:24 pm

solaryellow wrote:...I think each have their place. I can't see enjoying spanish chorizo with my eggs or nachos nearly as much as I enjoy mexican chorizo with them. :D

True. You should try Spanish chorizo in a Spanish tortilla (egg, potato and onion frittata). Equally good. Very different.
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