Scotch Eggs

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Postby markh » Thu Aug 18, 2005 11:40 pm

Thanks for the link - looks pretty straight forward.

Just to make sure, 'all-purpose flour' is self-raising rather than plain flour?
Before the Roman came to Rye or out to Severn strode, the rolling English Drunkard made the rolling English road... G.K.Chesterton
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Postby Wilf » Fri Aug 19, 2005 5:30 pm

Quails eggs are good for scotch eggs, its just the peeling!!
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Postby jpj » Fri Aug 19, 2005 6:20 pm

markh wrote:. . . 'all-purpose flour' is self-raising rather than plain flour?



yep, but that's just plain flour with baking powder added also.
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Postby pawclaws » Fri Sep 09, 2005 12:42 pm

jpj wrote:
markh wrote:. . . 'all-purpose flour' is self-raising rather than plain flour?



yep, but that's just plain flour with baking powder added also.


:shock: NO! NO! NO! "All purpose flour is devoid of any leavening what ever!! :shock:

Sorry to become so excited; but this looked like an emergency!! :D

The clue is in the term "All Purpose". Pre-leavened flours ( Self Rising, Hot Rize, etc) contain baking powder and are specifically for recipes which require baking powder. All Purpose flour contains no leavening and may be used for pie crusts, gravies, and whatever other recipes that may require unleavened flour. :D

Now, about these Scotch eggs; look quite appetizing! Is someone going to tell me how to make them; "please"? :D
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Postby sausagemaker » Fri Sep 09, 2005 2:52 pm

Hi pawclaws

pawclaws wrote:
Now, about these Scotch eggs; look quite appetizing! Is someone going to tell me how to make them; "please"? :D


It's really easy
1. Take your favourite sausage recipe & make it up into burgers about 4" round
2. Boil & Shell your eggs
3. Wrap each boiled egg in one of the burgers
4. Make a batter with flour & water or you could use a beaten egg
5. Dip the encased boiled egg into flour then batter or beaten egg
6. Roll into breadcrumbs
7. Deep fry until meat is cooked, about 5 minutes

Cool - best eaten cold

Hope this helps
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Postby pawclaws » Fri Sep 09, 2005 7:59 pm

Fantastic!! That I will be trying very soon. I already have visions of using colored eggs for holidays. Here is a humorous version of a Scotch egg recipe I found while looking for additional recipes I think you will enjoy:

"First, you shoot a bear and have part of the meat made into sausage. If you're one of those unfortunates who doesn't hunt, I suppose you'd use pork sausage meat instead.

To begin, crack a Kokanee, pour it into a frosted mug and quaff it while six of the eggs are hard boiling. When they're done, put them to one side and mix the meat, onion, and spice mixture together. Take the resulting mixture and coat the eggs with it carefully and evenly. You might even want to peel the shells off first - although they do add an interesting texture.

When the eggs are done, roll them in the flour, shake off the excess, and put the eggs in the fridge for about an hour so the meat sets up. While you're waiting, you might as well crack another Kokanee and put your feet up; no sense straining yourself.

A couple of minutes before the hours up, lightly beat the remaining egg with the tsp. of water. Again, you might want to remove the shell... Take the eggs, dip them in the egg mixture, and roll them in the breadcrumbs; they are now ready for cooking.

Traditionally, Scotch Eggs are deep fried. You can do that if you wish, but who needs all the extra grease in their diet and the mess and smell? I suggest you bake them in the oven at 375 F. for about 20 minutes or until the sausage covering is firm when picked at with a knife or fork. I usually stick them on a wire rack with a pan underneath so that they don't sit and cook in any grease that renders out of the sausage.

Once done take a buddy, yourself, the Scotch Eggs, and the remaining Kokanee into the living room. Watch Hockey Night in Canada as the Vancouver Canucks beat some godless team from the east while drinking Kokanee and munching the Eggs (you that is, not the Canucks) - no life like it.

These go well with Lowenserf Hot German mustard or Louisiana Hot Sauce. Best way to serve them is with a chilled Spinach and Bacon salad and fresh tomatoes. Enjoy!
Phil Foreman
AKA Pawclaws or
Sgt Kass Irons, CSA
Instructor of Cooks and QM, Mosby's Raiders
www.ohiocampcooks.org
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Postby markh » Sun Sep 11, 2005 8:22 pm

Pawclaws,
Thanks for the correction - I guess its as confusing either way with different terms that you take for granted - you were saying about a common language :D
Before the Roman came to Rye or out to Severn strode, the rolling English Drunkard made the rolling English road... G.K.Chesterton
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Postby pawclaws » Wed Sep 14, 2005 2:19 pm

Yes we do have a complex, weird but interesting language! Guys those Scotch eggs are terrific!! :D Now it is time for experimentation!!
Phil Foreman
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Postby jpj » Wed Sep 14, 2005 2:58 pm

yeah sorry from here, i just pulled a definition and refered to that . . .
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Postby pawclaws » Thu Sep 15, 2005 4:06 pm

Hey jpj, what do you think might be worse than confusing AP with Self Rising flour? How about "No Flour" at all!! :( Went in the morning to make a batch of Scotch Eggs and completely out of flour. I used Instant, dehydrated, potato flakes, a beaten egg, and crushed corn flakes. (Against the wall and needed to prepare the wife's brunch for work!) After a sausage wrap I rolled them in the potato, then the egg and finally the corn flakes. They were delicious with a very crisp exterior. The meat was well done. The entire structure held together very well. A bit darker than I would like. I'll try to post pictures so you guys may have a peek and let me know how they compare, visually, with what you are accustomed to. By the way, do you serve them sliced, halved or whole? Any particular garnish or condiment that is customary?
Has anyone tried a pickled egg prepared as a Scotch egg? :D I think I have an idea that involves a pickled quail egg, cayenne pepper, and "frog" sausage! :shock:
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Will This Do?

Postby pawclaws » Tue Oct 11, 2005 9:13 am

Image

What do you think (I bought flour!) :D
Phil Foreman
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Postby Platypus » Tue Oct 11, 2005 2:29 pm

The bacon and scotch eggs look great, not sure about the pancakes tho' :lol:
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The pancakes aren't pancakes!

Postby pawclaws » Tue Oct 11, 2005 2:58 pm

They are corn cakes. :D
Phil Foreman
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Platypus Just What is Wrong with my Corn Cakes?

Postby pawclaws » Wed Oct 12, 2005 4:27 pm

You aren't one of those (Heaven forbid) low Carbers are you?? :shock:

Anyway, you guys with your Scotch eggs have created quite a sensation with the folk on my web site. http://ohiocampcooks.proboards19.com/in ... 650&page=1
Here is a thread I began a couple days ago related to the Scotch eggs! :D

By the way, are you English gentlemen responsible for the egg fried in the toast; "toad in the hole" and "bird in the nest" I have heard it called??

Man, I love this website! :D
Phil Foreman
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Instructor of Cooks and QM, Mosby's Raiders
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Postby Paul Kribs » Wed Oct 12, 2005 6:20 pm

pawclaws

Toad In The Hole is actually sausage meat cooked in a 'yorkshire pudding' batter. It was so called becauase the blobs of sausage meat resembled the back of a toad, and as it sat in a raised batter it resembled a toad in a hole. It has since evolved to actual sausages cooked in a batter, but is still referred to as toad in the hole.

I have not heard of 'bird in the nest', but if you whisk a couple of eggs with salt and pepper and dunk a slice of bread in, both sides, and then fry it... it is known as 'Gypsy Toast'. You can add mustard to the beaten egg and it is very tastey.

Regards, Paul Kribs
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