Scotch Eggs

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Toad In The Hole...

Postby pawclaws » Wed Oct 12, 2005 6:57 pm

Aha!! Now the egg covered fried bread we call French toast. Of course most of the recipes are a bit more elaborate. A "stuffed" version is becoming very popular. For this a scrambled egg batter is prepared, usually with heavy cream,, vanilla, and possibly cinnamon added and two slices of bread are made a sandwich with cream cheese, slices banana or both, then battered and fried. Very rich but quite delicious. :D Thank you for the Toad in the Hole information. I suppose you are familiar with our very similar Corn Dogs and Pigs in a Blanket dishes? :)
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Postby Paul Kribs » Wed Oct 12, 2005 7:17 pm

pawclaws

I am familiar with 'pigs in blankets', although I do not know of Corn Dogs. It is quite a diversity with our disatnce as countries. Mind you this is how we learn and diversify with each others recipes to enhance our culinary knowledge... Enjoying food is what it is all about. Live to eat, don't eat to live.

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Postby Oddley » Wed Oct 12, 2005 7:56 pm

pawclaws,

I'm familiar with bread with a hole fried with an egg in it. I believe it was very popular during the war years, served as a meal. if we English invented it I'm not sure although I think it's a traditional English dish.

I'm glad you all like the Scotch eggs.
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Postby pawclaws » Thu Oct 13, 2005 4:33 am

Thanks Oddley! They are very delicious and appear to be versatile as well. I'll keep you folk up to date on our experimentation with various coatings/breading. Meanwhile, our Corn Dogs are very simple. A corn bread batter is prepared for battering hot dog sausages(Franks, Frankfurters, Weiners ) :D I have no idea what you folk might call them! :shock: The weiners are impaled (lengthwise) onto a wooden skewer about half the thickness of a lead pencil, dredged in plain flour then the corn bread batter and deep fried at about 375 F. Actual corn bread recipes vary quite a bit so normally one uses whatever recipe is found on the corn meal or corn bread mix sack. These are very tasty! :D
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Postby Paul Kribs » Thu Oct 13, 2005 5:45 am

We do have a similar thing here in England, they are called 'sausage in batter' and are sold in fish and chip shops. They are not impaled on a skewer, just deep fried.

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Postby aris » Thu Oct 13, 2005 6:41 am

You can buy corn dogs here in the UK at Costco. My son loves them :-)
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Postby pawclaws » Thu Oct 13, 2005 5:02 pm

Now that is amazing! Costco can become our interpreter!! :D Take a loolk at this link: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=%2 ... he+hole%22 102,000 hits for "Toad in the hole!" :D :D :D

Here is an interesting link to an "Egg in the hole" which gives an "ancient" account of the dish attributing it to Ontario CN! :D
http://66.102.7.104/search?q=cache:7tv5 ... e%22&hl=en
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Postby sausagemaker » Thu Oct 13, 2005 7:39 pm

Hi Paul

The sausage in batter you refer to is not the same.
Corn dogs are made from frankfurters & the batter is more like a cake batter.
I can post a recipe from "The Betty Crocker Cookbook"if you wish to give it a whirl.

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Postby Paul Kribs » Thu Oct 13, 2005 8:15 pm

sausagemaker

A recipe posted is always good for future reference, and gives others the chance to try it as well. I would appreciate it, thanks.

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Postby pawclaws » Thu Oct 13, 2005 9:59 pm

Here is one you might try. I have several more and as I mentioned virtually any corn bread recipe may be used.

1/2 Cup Yellow corn meal
6 Frankfurters
1/2 Cup Flour
1 Tablespoon Sugar
1 Teaspoon Dry mustard
1 Teaspoon Baking powder
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
1/2 Cup Milk
1 Egg, lightly beaten
1 Tablespoon Melted shortening
6 Skewers or sticks

Combine the cornmeal, flour, sugar, mustard, baking powder and salt, mixing well. Add the milk, egg and shortening, mixing until very smooth. Pour the mixture into a tall glass. Put the frankfurters on sticks. Dip them into the cornmeal batter to coat them evenly. Deep fry in oil heated to 375 degrees until golden brown, about two minutes. Drain on paper towels. :D

Another...

Oil for deep fat frying
1 Cup flour
2/3 Cup corn meal
1/2 Teaspoon baking powder
2 Tablespoons sugar
1 Teaspoon salt
2 Tablespoons solid shortening
1 egg, beaten
3/4 Cup milk
10 hot dogs
Mustard

Heat oil to 375 degrees.

Mix flour, corn meal, baking powder, sugar and salt. Cut in the shortening with a pastry blender or a couple of knives until the lumps are the size of crumbs. Separately combine the beaten egg and 3/4 cup milk, add to the dry ingredients and mix well. Add milk if necessary to achieve the proper consistency. The batter should be mushy not wet, but liquid enough that it will flowslightly (to coat the hot dogs more or less uniformly.)

Unwrap the hot dogs, pat them dry. Insert the skewers (you can do this afterward if you're using a mini fryer and the skewers won't fit) and dip them in the batter one at a time, coating all sides. Let each drip before inserting it slowly into the oil and fry until golden brown, about a minute on a side. Drain and brush with mustard.

As with all deep fried food, fry only a few at a time, and allow the oil to reheat to the proper temperature between batches, if necessary.
:D

Whatever condiment you folk like with your sausages will probably work well in place of the mustard suggested here. I use catsup (ketchup), mayonaise, or Ranch dressing as well as mustard and do not really have a particular preference. Something that just occurred to me is malt vinegar; bet that would work as well! :D

Hint: pat them dry and dredge in plain flour before dipping into the batter to assure good coverage and adhesion!
Phil Foreman
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Sgt Kass Irons, CSA
Instructor of Cooks and QM, Mosby's Raiders
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Postby Spuddy » Fri Oct 14, 2005 7:27 am

I assume cornmeal is the same as what we would here call "Polenta" or is it finer in texture?
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Postby Paul Kribs » Fri Oct 14, 2005 7:32 am

pawclaws

Thanks for the recipes. I would imagine it would work with any long, slim pre-cooked sausage. I don't eat commercially produced sausages as I like to know what I am eating. The very reason I took up sausage making.

Is corn meal the same as maize meal?

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Postby pawclaws » Fri Oct 14, 2005 2:04 pm

Yes on the long slim sausages and yes, as near as I can figure, Maize meal and Palenta meal should equal corn meal. The one corn meal product I can think of that would not be a good substitute is Masa Mix or Masa Flour, used for tortillas, which is far too finely ground. If anyone is in doubt give me an alert and I'll be happy to mail a sample of the meals used here in the US for you to compare. Most of our corn meal recipes begin with a basic corn meal with other things added. Of course, this has given rise to the corn bread mixes to which one simply adds something wet. I'll try to post additional recipes for corn bread and see if I can get a photograph with enough detail to show the texture of our corn meals. By the way they are available in both white and yellow varieties. I prefer the yellow. Oh Paul, with regard to the sausage; a recipe following the German Knackwurst ingredients but made slender as a Frankfurter would be terrific! The sweetness of the garlic would compliment the corn bread batter very well. :D
Phil Foreman
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Instructor of Cooks and QM, Mosby's Raiders
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Postby pawclaws » Fri Oct 14, 2005 4:49 pm

Here are a couple links to photographs of corn meal compared with Masa.

http://ohiocampcooks.nstemp.org/Corn%20meal1.jpg

http://ohiocampcooks.nstemp.org/Corn%20meal2.jpg

As you can see the yellow corn meal bits are about three times the size of the white masa bits. The masa is nearly as fine as jplain flour or face powder. Corn meal is also available in a much more course grind almost like beach sand. I like it occasionally :D
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Postby sausagemaker » Fri Oct 14, 2005 6:20 pm

Here's a recipe from a cookbook I picked up in MA a few years ago

1 pound Frankfurters
1 cup plain flour
2 Tablespoons cornmeal
1.5 teaspoons Baking Powder
0.5 teaspoon Salt
3 Tablespoons Cooking Oil
0.75 Cup Milk
1 Egg Beaten

Pat frankfurters dry
Heat oil in deep fryer 180
Mix all dry ingredients together
Whisk oil, egg & milk together & add dry ingredients
Whisk to make a thick batter
Insert sticks into Frankfurters
Dip into batter allow excess to drip off
Fry in hot oil until brown about 5 minutes
Drain, cool, enjoy.

From �Betty Crockers Cookbook� ISBN 0553266608

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