Using Fresh Peppers in a Fresh Sausage?

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Using Fresh Peppers in a Fresh Sausage?

Postby Tulcat » Thu Aug 18, 2005 3:30 pm

I was just given a large lot of habaneros and jalapenos, that I think would be great to use in a fresh sausage. Usually with 48 hours of making, my fresh sausages are frozen and vaccuum packed and then consumed within 4 months.

I am wondering what, if any, are the issues with using fresh peppers in fresh sausage, that is then frozen? I can't seem to find any recipes in my books (no problem as I'll make my own), but am wondering if there are any pitfalls I need to be aware of?

Do the peppers cause any problems... should the pieces be minced fine or chuncky... do they lose their flavor after awhile... etc?

What are your favorite spices to compliment hot peppers?

Any pointers and tips provided will be appreciated.

Regards
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Postby Oddley » Thu Aug 18, 2005 4:03 pm

The link below will take you too a recipe using fresh peppers. I designed this sausage for me and my family. They all love it.

You can of course make it hotter if you wish.


http://forum.sausagemaking.org/viewtopic.php?t=457&
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Postby DarrellS » Thu Aug 18, 2005 4:29 pm

This is my wifes favorite, I prefer it a little hotter though.

It's a variation of Big Wheels recipe.

Jalapeno and Cheese Brats

5 lbs boneless pork butt
9 oz fresh japs seeded
4.5 oz hi-melt cheddar cheese
2 T. chopped fresh garlic
2 1/2 t. granulated garlic
5 t. Tender Quick
1 t. salt
1 t. black pepper
1 1/2 t. white pepper
1 t. cayenne pepper
1 1/2 t. brown sugar
5 t. hungarian paprika
1 t. basil leaves
1 T. dried parsley
3 oz dry white wine
3 oz sprite
3 oz water

Soak casings in warm water overnight, flush thoroughly.
Run jalapenos and cheese through coarse plate and refrigerate.
Mix all other ingredients with the the liquids and refrigerate.
Cut the meat to fit the grinder.
Grind on the fine plate.
Dump spiced liquid over the meat mix well.
Add japs and cheeese to the meat and mix well..and mix some more.
Stuff into med hog casings.
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Postby Paul Kribs » Thu Aug 18, 2005 4:57 pm

Tulcat

Do not be afraid to use peppers/chillies fresh. I use them all the time and they are superb for both heat and the chilli hit. Once added to sausage they freeze very well indeed. I normally use birdseye/ratshit (are we allowed to say that) chillies and add them to Francos mexican mix and the Jalapeno mix. I also use scotch bonnets in Jamaican sausage. My recommendation is to finely chop them before adding, and thus dispersing the flavours fully into the meat.. seeds and all.

Wilf could probably give you guidance on other types of chillies.

Regards, Paul Kribs
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Postby welsh wizard » Thu Aug 18, 2005 7:13 pm

Hi Paul

I am interested in your Scotch Bonnet ratio. The last time I saw a friend of mine try one of the hot wonedrs, the smallest amount tended to blow his head away from his shoulders and he then spent the rest of the evening with his head under the tap or had his lips wrapped arround a bottle of milk uttering the word "poison". Since then a kind member of this forum has given me a scotch bonnet plant and I would dearly love to use them as I am a sucker for hot foods.

In your opinion do hot peppers mellow when added to say a sausage?

Cheers WW
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Postby Tulcat » Thu Aug 18, 2005 7:22 pm

Well, I didn't know what a scotch bonnet was and after a quick Internet search I discovered that it is another name for the Habanero pepper.

And yes, Paul, please share the ratio you are using.
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Postby welsh wizard » Thu Aug 18, 2005 7:47 pm

Hi Tulcat

I believe the Scotch B is the hottest pepper in the world (well at least my mate thinks so) that is unless someone knows any different?
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Postby Paul Kribs » Thu Aug 18, 2005 8:56 pm

As to the ratio of scotch bonnets, If you take the recipe on Len Poli's site for Jamaican Jerk sausage where it is recommended to use 6 bonnets.. then reduce it to about 2 to 3 then you will get more than enough heat.
http://home.pacbell.net/lpoli/index_files/Jerk%20Sausage.pdf
I like chilli heat but have tasted home grown bonnets raw and believe me they are very very hot. A 1/4" x 1/4" piece is more than enough in the raw form. They do lose a bit of the harshness when cooked though, and do meld into the mix well. They do have a unique flavour and I take my hat off to Len if he uses 6 in a 5 lb mix. If I put 6 in, my hat would come off on it's own. He does advocate wearing gloves when preparing the bonnets and I for one would definitely concur with this. It would prematurely terminate a romantic evening. I find birdseye chillies a lot more subtle whilst retaining good chilli heat.

I saw a program where a couple of guys caught a bonefish or barracuda and they marinaded it in about 8 scotch bonnets.. I knew they wouldn't eat it and so it was... thrown away. Beware. Don't bother using the seeds of the bonnet, it's hot enough without them.

Wilf could possibly give you more information on the ratio of scotch bonnets.

Regards, Paul Kribs
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