Hanger steak tacos

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Postby mitchamus » Wed Feb 22, 2012 4:30 am

salumi512 wrote: So Darwin is only a generation or so away from Texas soil.


yeah I know - I'm just messing with ya!
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Postby mitchamus » Wed Feb 22, 2012 4:35 am

for 20 points - can anyone spot the mistake in the text below?

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Postby mitchamus » Wed Feb 22, 2012 4:39 am

metric conversion FAIL!

180cm = 70" not 7 " !!!!!

180mm = 7"

I don't know - All these Luddites with their inches, feet and all those fractions... :lol: :lol:


I wish it was 70"!!!.... That's a BIG taco!!!
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Postby salumi512 » Wed Feb 22, 2012 1:50 pm

mitchamus wrote:metric conversion FAIL!

180cm = 70" not 7 " !!!!!

180mm = 7"

I don't know - All these Luddites with their inches, feet and all those fractions... :lol: :lol:


I wish it was 70"!!!.... That's a BIG taco!!!


It must be from Darwin :P That is pretty funny.
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Postby yotmon » Fri Apr 27, 2012 1:14 am

Apologies for digging up an old thread, but I found the discussion on this fine piece of beef interesting. I was a butcher in the mid-seventies and this piece never came attached to the sides of beef as it would be removed at the abbatoir. We did buy them in seperately during the winter months to boost our stocks of 'stewing' beef. It was classed as 'offal' then, seeing as it was removed with the liver heart and lungs. We only ever sold it as 'Skirt' for long slow casserole type cooking. Its only recently that I discovered some in a local supermarket. It had been reduced to about a quarter of the price seeing as no-one was buying it. I was going to casserole it, but read a french cook book which prompted me to fry it very briefly and it was wonderfully tender. I think the trick is either to cook it fast or long and slow - there's no in between ! Since then I have seen it referred to as Hanging tender, Onglet, Feather cut and the ubiquitous Skirt. Gorgeous with matchstick type chips (french fries).
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Postby salumi512 » Fri Apr 27, 2012 1:52 am

Yotmon, I don't credit the french with much, but I have never known them to throw away a tasty morsel. The onglet is the same cut. Long live the hanger steak!
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Postby tomwal » Fri Apr 27, 2012 11:04 am

Great information gus, what would be a good equivalent here in the uk, would love to make them tacos.
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Postby yotmon » Fri Apr 27, 2012 1:02 pm

tomwal wrote:Great information gus, what would be a good equivalent here in the uk, would love to make them tacos.


Hi Tomwal, you can still pick it up at certain butchers - probably private ones rather than the supermarkets. If you've never seen or handled it, it's a dark almost brown meat rather than red, with a very open almost course texture. It usually has a thick connective tissue to the sides which to me gives it the appearance of a large squid (I have a vivid imagination). A photo on this thread shows why its also called the 'feather cut' and its a good example of what to look for.

There is a good butchers called Cook at 29 ORMSKIRK ROAD, RAINFORD. 01744 882644, which is probably about 12 miles from Southport. He has a small slaughter house in the rear yard of his shop and used to kill his beasts on a Monday morning. I had a farmer friend (deceased) who used to supply him with beef steers from Bold. I suppose if u got your order in early enough and explained exactly what you wanted, then he could put one aside for you. All the best Ste.
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Postby tomwal » Fri Apr 27, 2012 1:17 pm

yotmon wrote:
tomwal wrote:Great information gus, what would be a good equivalent here in the uk, would love to make them tacos.


Hi Tomwal, you can still pick it up at certain butchers - probably private ones rather than the supermarkets. If you've never seen or handled it, it's a dark almost brown meat rather than red, with a very open almost course texture. It usually has a thick connective tissue to the sides which to me gives it the appearance of a large squid (I have a vivid imagination). A photo on this thread shows why its also called the 'feather cut' and its a good example of what to look for.

There is a good butchers called Cook at 29 ORMSKIRK ROAD, RAINFORD. 01744 882644, which is probably about 12 miles from Southport. He has a small slaughter house in the rear yard of his shop and used to kill his beasts on a Monday morning. I had a farmer friend (deceased) who used to supply him with beef steers from Bold. I suppose if u got your order in early enough and explained exactly what you wanted, then he could put one aside for you. All the best Ste.

Cheers Ste, think I know where you mean, Rainford not far from where I work, will be checking it out this as I am hols will let you know, hope this guy does his own pork, that would be a result.


Wal
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Postby yotmon » Fri Apr 27, 2012 1:48 pm

tomwal wrote:
yotmon wrote:
tomwal wrote:Great information gus, what would be a good equivalent here in the uk, would love to make them tacos.


Hi Tomwal, you can still pick it up at certain butchers - probably private ones rather than the supermarkets. If you've never seen or handled it, it's a dark almost brown meat rather than red, with a very open almost course texture. It usually has a thick connective tissue to the sides which to me gives it the appearance of a large squid (I have a vivid imagination). A photo on this thread shows why its also called the 'feather cut' and its a good example of what to look for.

There is a good butchers called Cook at 29 ORMSKIRK ROAD, RAINFORD. 01744 882644, which is probably about 12 miles from Southport. He has a small slaughter house in the rear yard of his shop and used to kill his beasts on a Monday morning. I had a farmer friend (deceased) who used to supply him with beef steers from Bold. I suppose if u got your order in early enough and explained exactly what you wanted, then he could put one aside for you. All the best Ste.

Cheers Ste, think I know where you mean, Rainford not far from where I work, will be checking it out this as I am hols will let you know, hope this guy does his own pork, that would be a result.

Wal


I don't think he does pigs (maybe wrong) as its a different set-up involving scalding tanks etc. The nearest pork plant to me is C.S Morphets & Sons Ltd ('Phythians'). Tan House Farm, Alder Lane, Cronton, Widnes. If u go down the M57 and come off at Cronton, it just down a country lane there. Phythians used to have the slaughter house in St.Helens town centre years ago. I know that they did have a shop sale, but it was only until 10am. May be lucky and get a bucket of pigs blood thrown in ( not literally).
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Postby tomwal » Fri Apr 27, 2012 5:11 pm

Thanks very much Ste that's two great leads to be going on with and both within easy travelling.

Wal
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