Hard Cider Whole-Grain Mustard Recipe

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Hard Cider Whole-Grain Mustard Recipe

Postby JerBear » Wed Aug 15, 2012 4:13 am

Having recently joined the local homebrew club, QUAFF (Quality Ale and Fermentation Fraternity), and in anticipation of some up-coming events I wanted to try my hand at mustard again. I did a quick search of the ol' wide web of the world and found a trusted source with what looked to be a solid recipe. Below is my interpretation of whole-grain recipe from Hank over at hunter angler gardener cook

Hard Cider Whole-Grain Mustard

Makes about 1 cup.

Prep Time: 12 hours

6 tablespoons brown mustard seeds
1/2 cup mustard powder (I used Coleman's)
3 tablespoons apple-cider vinegar
1/2 cup hard apple cider (homemade by my buddy Mike S.)
2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon honey

I took about 2/3 of the mustard seeds and ground them up chunky-like in my mortar and pestle because I feel I have more control over the final grind and can stop when I get to the right grind size. Then I just mixed everything together well with a whisk and tossed it in the fridge to get all happy-like overnight.

Here is the finished product dabbed on some eye-talian sausage, which I'm happy to say is a success. (Not the best pairing but I can deal with it) This stuff is no sissy mustard, it's some seriously high-test clear your nasal passages kinda pungent but in a good way.

I'm going to try another batch in the near future with some hops again but I'm thinking success is nearly guaranteed in which case I'll be improving upon success rather than un-quitting, or not quitting, whatever... I'll also leave more whole mustard seeds and increasing the honey by about 50% give or take.

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Postby grisell » Wed Aug 15, 2012 12:18 pm

Mmmm... looks great! :) Thanks for the recipe.

A piece of advice if I may: After mixing, it's a good idea to keep the mustard warm (40-50 C/ 105-120 F) for a few hours. This will help the enzymes to reduce the bitterness from freshly ground mustard seeds.
André

I have a simple taste - I'm always satisfied with the best.
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Postby wheels » Wed Aug 15, 2012 12:45 pm

Ah, that's the trick is it. Thanks Grisell.

Phil
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Postby JerBear » Wed Aug 15, 2012 1:14 pm

Great suggestion! Is there any concern regarding 'danger zone' temps? It's been wicked hot around here the past week or so.
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Postby tomwal » Wed Aug 15, 2012 2:07 pm

Hi JerBear
Can you tell me what hard cider is.

Thanks

Wal
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Postby wheels » Wed Aug 15, 2012 2:40 pm

It's what we call cider (alcoholic) - in parts of the US some types of (non-alcoholic) apple juice is called cider.

HTH

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Postby JerBear » Wed Aug 15, 2012 4:31 pm

Thanks Phil, I love hearing about the cultural/language differences between two countries who both purport to speak the same language. I've said for some time that English is spoken in England and American is spoken in the US. :D

grisell, though the mustard's been refrigerated for about 2-3 days now is it too late to try the room temp ageing?
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Postby grisell » Wed Aug 15, 2012 7:24 pm

JerBear wrote:[---]
grisell, though the mustard's been refrigerated for about 2-3 days now is it too late to try the room temp ageing?


No, I don't think so. The enzymes should still be active. There is no issue with bacteria at these high temperatures. Room temperature is not right. Ideally, the temperature should be around 50 C/120 F and held for 6-12 hours. This can of course be hard to accomplish in a household.

I use to do like this: Put the sealed freshly made mustard jar in a bowl with hot tap water (which in my apartment holds 55 C/130 F) and cover. When it has cooled, fill up with new hot water etc. I usually care to wait for 4-6 hours only, but it makes a great difference. All the bitterness is gone and the flavours have bloomed out.

It is probably possible to do the same thing at room temperature, but it will take much longer. BTW, at temperatures above 60 C/140 F, the enzymes will be destroyed, so this method doesn't work at all on mustard that has been boiled.

(This is what I've been told. I don't know much about biochemistry, but it sure works! :wink: )
André

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Postby grisell » Wed Aug 15, 2012 7:30 pm

If you have really hot days, as you say, placing the jars in a sunny window for a few days should work perfectly. Cover them with a cloth. Maybe sunshine is bad for mustard, I don't know for sure.
André

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Postby grisell » Wed Aug 15, 2012 7:35 pm

BTW, if you are interested in mustard, here are a few recipes that I've collected:

http://forum.sausagemaking.org/viewtopi ... 7525#57525
André

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Postby JerBear » Wed Aug 15, 2012 7:39 pm

Thanks for the link! I'm going to try the sealed/jar/bowl/hot water trick and might try wrapping everything in a heating pad just to extend the heating per water addition.

Thanks for all the feedback!
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Postby JerBear » Wed Aug 15, 2012 7:42 pm

Holy crap....those quantities are HUGE! I believe I'm doing a little scaling down to smaller quantities. :shock:
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Postby Snags » Wed Aug 15, 2012 10:10 pm

Excellent recipe thanks for that

Do you have a recipe for a Dijon Style Mustard too ?
yet to take the plunge still researching
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Postby JerBear » Wed Aug 15, 2012 11:31 pm

you're welcome. I don't personally have a Dijon recipe but I believe I saw at least one in the links above.
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Postby salumi512 » Wed Aug 15, 2012 11:41 pm

wheels wrote:It's what we call cider (alcoholic) - in parts of the US some types of (non-alcoholic) apple juice is called cider.


There used to be more of a distinction in the US between cider and apple juice. The former being an unpasteurized press from the apples that would be pretty cloudy, whereas apple juice is often only 10% juice and always pasteurized. These days there is little difference, except cider is usually 100% juice.
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