Looking for Sausage supplier in France

The place to swap commercial recipes, techniques etc.

Postby Chez Barenton » Thu Apr 13, 2006 10:41 am

We too loved French sausages when we visited for holidays, living here is different, you start to realise that actually there is no choice, you�re limited to the same three recipes no matter which shop you go to.

You also start to realise that actually their skins are very tuff (the children cant chew them) and that the content is very gristly.

The French love British sausages, ham and bacon.

We are opening a French shop and want to introduce variations of flavours but at the same time use French produce, this is why importing is an option we�ve chosen not to pursue.

So im guessing no one does know a butcher over here then? We did find one but he ws very expensive indeed, even his trade prices exceeded normal retail prices for France. Approaching a French one with recipes is a good idea, we shall investigate this option, we will have to find someone quite a distance away to keep our commercial advantage and our French may let us down but its worth ago.

Brussels we don�t miss, curry and parsnips maybe (although not at the same time!).
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Postby Oddley » Thu Apr 13, 2006 11:32 am

If you go to the Rivercottage forum and join, then contact a bloke called Fatman, he may be able to help. He has moved to France and is interested in sausages.

http://forum.rivercottage.net/index.php ... c4a0322085
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Postby Wohoki » Thu Apr 13, 2006 3:03 pm

Sausagefans: they don't use filler at all, in good butchers. That's why they need to be cooked very slowly and carefully, so that the meat juices are re-absorbed into the meat itself, and then rested for five to ten before serving. Bangers with a filler are much more robust in the pan. A lot of French raw sausage are intended for stews, or for poaching then grilling.

The thing that gets me is that moving to France when you don't like the food is like moving to Venus and then complaining that you can't breathe the air.

Anyone like to claim that British food is better than French?
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Postby sausagefans.com » Thu Apr 13, 2006 4:08 pm

Wohoki wrote:Anyone like to claim that British food is better than French?


Ha ha ha no way!
Love sausages?
www.sausagefans.com
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Postby aris » Thu Apr 13, 2006 4:27 pm

sausagefans.com wrote:
Wohoki wrote:I'd guess that what the ex-pats are after is a bit of nostalgia, and a taste of life back home. The pork sold in most French butchers is usually locally sourced and outdoor reared, so it might be a bit "porky" for folk raised on British meat. The spices and herbs used will be the same, but in different proportions, and the sausage have no rusk, so they require more care while cooking them than most Brits lavish on their bangers, if they are not to end up dry.


Do they use another sort of filler?


Filler in sausages is a very British thing - most continental sausages are just meat and spices/herbs.
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Postby jenny_haddow » Thu Apr 13, 2006 4:48 pm

There's a French joke: "What's the smallest book in the world?".

Answer: "The book of British cookery."
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Postby Oddley » Thu Apr 13, 2006 5:03 pm

Wohoki wrote:Anyone like to claim that British food is better than French?


What crap have you guys been eating? my British food would stand against any French food that I have had. Some of the best seafood in the world surrounds our coast. Great beef, lamb and pork is also grown here. All you have too do is pay the price and know how to cook it.
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Postby aris » Thu Apr 13, 2006 5:08 pm

Oddley wrote:
Wohoki wrote:Anyone like to claim that British food is better than French?


What crap have you guys been eating? my British food would stand against any French food that I have had. Some of the best seafood in the world surrounds our coast. Great beef, lamb and pork is also grown here. All you have too do is pay the price and know how to cook it.


Interestingly, you'll find the best and freshest seafood (and probably from British waters) on every other street corner in Paris - which is about as far from any coast than any city in France :-)

That's the problem with Britain - we have good stuff here, but nobody appreciates it. When you can find it, it costs the earth.
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Postby Oddley » Thu Apr 13, 2006 5:21 pm

What surprises me is the like of sausagefans.com who comes from Norfolk. My mum lived in great Yarmouth, the absolute best seafood I have ever tasted was bought from the market in great Yarmouth. The kippers were to die for they were smoked over oak and the smoke flavor really came through and they were cheap as chips. If they were produced in France they would have a bloody appellation controle on them. We don't appreciate what we have.
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Postby jenny_haddow » Thu Apr 13, 2006 6:00 pm

The fact that we are in this forum trying to create better fare for our tables demonstrates the general standard of food out there in the average food market here on the UK.

OK, it's fascinating stuff making our own sausages, bacon and ham, but I bet we do it because its BETTER. In France you don't have that problem, even the major supermarket chains display fare of terrific quality compared with here, as for eating out ...........

I agree, we do have some great food produced in this country, but we cant all get to the farmers markets or have our meat supplied by the Dukes of Buccleuch, and not a great deal of effort seems to go into trying to get this great food within reach of the general populace.

The French housewife wouldn't tolerate it, nor will I, so I go to great lengths to find good food, that's how I found this site, looking for a supplier of good sausages.

OK off the soapbox, dinner to cook for the old man, by the way, if I lived in France I'd have to have kippers flown over!

Cheers

Jen
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Postby Oddley » Thu Apr 13, 2006 6:20 pm

The reason why the average French person eats better, than the average English person is that the French housewife spends a third of her income on food. She is also willing to go shopping for fresh produce every day, who is willing to do that apart from me. If the English did the same, the quality in the supermarket would be as good as the French. The old saying "you only get what you pay for"

I spend far more on food than my compatriots. But as they say to me I eat like a king. Whilst they are willing to put up with a tesco ready meal yuk.
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Postby jenny_haddow » Thu Apr 13, 2006 6:32 pm

The French housewife would declare your faggots "c'est manifique".
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Postby Wohoki » Thu Apr 13, 2006 6:53 pm

You'll have noticed that I said "food" rather than "ingredients". There isn't a better cut of meat on the face of the Earth than good British rib of beef , and there isn't a better veg than purple sprouting (at the moment :D ).

My point was that most British people eat rubbish, and it is true that the best of what we have to offer gets exported.

Ex-pats get hankerings after the most dreadfull junk (they brought back 'Pickled-Onion Monster-Munch' because of popular demand, for Gods sake!) Buy the good stuff, learn how to cook it: the better the ingredients you have the less you have to do to it.

So,

Anyone like to claim that British food is better than French?


(And Oddley, despite being male I am a house-wife: it says so on my marriage certificate. I wake up thinking about tomorrow-nights dinner: you're not the only one!)
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Postby Oddley » Thu Apr 13, 2006 7:17 pm

I completely disagree with your statement as is. If you are saying that in general the french eat better quality food then I would agree. If you are saying that french recipes are better I disagree.

I would not even agree that eating out in France is any better. I live in central London and some of the restaurants are serving fabulous English food. Have you ever eaten at Gary Rhodes, Gordon Ramseys or the Savoy.
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Postby Paul Kribs » Thu Apr 13, 2006 9:34 pm

Been watching this discussion with interest and must agree with Oddley regarding you get what you pay for and the end result reflects what the chef does with the produce. I am not a chef but include cooking as one of my interests. I do however try to buy the best produce, provided I do not deem it a rip-off, and cook it to the best of my ability. I spend many hours in the kitchen because I live to eat, not eat to live. I have never been to France and don't intend to visit, but have seen French chefs on tv creating some very nice meals indeed. I have tried limited French produce and wasn't over impressed with it, no better than I can eat in London. I have tasted snails (escargot) and they don't come anywhere near a decent whelk and frogs legs don't compare flavourwise to even a battery chicken. I have no doubt that the French do construct some superb dishes and maybe I am missing out but this country has so much to offer foodwise. As has been mentioned it is the mentality of the mainstream of the British public who are quite happy to put up with the garbage offered as food nowadays for fear of offending retailers. I wish more people would voice their opinions and even threaten to refuse to return to said retailers until they stock quality items.

Don't get me wrong, I really enjoy ethnic food.. I have passed my passion for cooking to my son, and it looks as though my grandaughter will be following in my footsteps as well. My paella surpasses anything I have had in the tourist resorts in Spain, but I have yet to try a proper one cooked in-land, which I imagine would be a different story. My wifes Spanish friend even commented that my paella was better than anything she has tasted in Spain, not only was she bought up in Spain but also worked in a Spanish restaurant in Lewisham who's signature dish was... paella.

I suppose, at the end of the day, it all comes down to peoples personal preference and taste.

Nouvelle Cuisine.. what was that all about... :?:

Just my twopenneth

Regards, Paul Kribs
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