KING BLUE STILTON........

Recipes and techniques for soft cheese.

Postby Rik vonTrense » Sun May 07, 2006 4:34 pm

Hi Liz.....

Usually they are graduated and supplied with a weight or the instruction what weight to use.

I am puzzled with your reference to my stilton and this

'You now have to find a weight to place on this to press down on the curd block for several days'


with a stilton you only have to tie it in a stilton bundle and put it between two boards and stick a 10lbs weight on it for an hour or so.

Weights that I use are a set of dumbell disc purchased from Tesco I have four 1 KG discs and 4 0.5kg discs.....you can thread these on a piece of tape and hang them with a butchers hook...the further along the weight bar you move them the heavier they will press.

I check my big ones with a set of bathroom scales under the ram and using a set of weights mark off along the bar what weight they are pressing at the ram.

I can go up to 200lbs like this.


I just checked on the stilton instructions....

.
Wrap the top and bottom cut outs from the tin in cling film (this is called a �follower�) and place on top of the curds. You now have to find a weight to place on this to press down on the curd block for several days.


If you are using a fruit tin then fill up a bottle of water and sit this on top of the follower any weight will do as you are only compacting the curd and not so much really pressing it.


.
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Postby markh » Sun May 07, 2006 9:57 pm

Rik, I have just done my second Stilton 'Tin' - while doing so I realise I had mis-read the instructions on my 1st attempt :oops:

My 'Blue cheese starter' used closer to 1/4 oz rather than an ounce of Roquefort , I was wondering if this will cause a problem.

If it does, would a solution be to 'butter' the truckle using Roquefort creamed with milk prior to needling?
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Postby Rik vonTrense » Sun May 07, 2006 11:34 pm

You should get a reaction even with a quarter of an ounce as it multiplies iteslf but you could give it a little buttering with some goo not going to do any harm. In fact before I have just used a teaspoonful and it has worked perfectly.

Even if you do not get any veining it will still taste the same as Stilton.,


.
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Postby jenny_haddow » Mon May 08, 2006 11:47 am

Image


Same cheese, two days later.

Jen
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Postby jenny_haddow » Mon May 08, 2006 11:54 am

Image


Stilton moulded in a fruit tin.


Jen

Did have more but we've scoffed them - tastes wonderful!
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Postby Rik vonTrense » Mon May 08, 2006 12:17 pm

Your fruit tin Stilton has the right colour for the skin.

I am going to see if I can reduce your first piccy..I you have a photo program then all you have to do is to resize the image top 342x273 pixels
and save as that and then upload it via your picture host.


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Postby Oddley » Mon May 08, 2006 12:24 pm

For anybody that wants to easily resize their images, below is a link to PIXResizer a good free resizing program.

http://bluefive.pair.com/pixresizer.htm
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Postby Rik vonTrense » Mon May 08, 2006 3:16 pm

How old was it when you ate it Jen ??

I removed your big first picture as you have it up smaller now.

Big pictures make the rest of the thread difficult to read...


.
I like the colours yours are going it shows a good baterial background.
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Postby somerset lad » Mon May 08, 2006 3:37 pm

One of my favourite cheeses is Stinking Bishop, it is a soft cheese with a washed rind, using perry made from the pear called stinking bishop.
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Postby Wohoki » Mon May 08, 2006 3:46 pm

Which I believe is named after the pear variety used to make the perry, rather than the fact that the cheese smells like a badly bathed clergyman :D
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Postby jenny_haddow » Mon May 08, 2006 4:45 pm

Hi Rik,

Glad the cheeses are passing muster. That one was about four weeks old when eaten. Great flavour.

I've just taken the Lancashire out of the mould this afternoon, what a difference the right equipment makes.

Now I've got to grips with this photo posting lark I'll post a picture of it.

Cheers

Jen
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Postby Wohoki » Sun May 14, 2006 2:56 pm

Hi Rik, just started a Stilton this afternoon, thanks for the technique.

I owe you a recipe. :D
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Postby Wohoki » Mon May 15, 2006 10:33 am

I am now the proud father of a bouncing baby Stilton. Thanks to the exellence of the instructions it went like clockwork, I got a clean break exactly on time. Now the waiting game :D
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Postby jenny_haddow » Mon May 15, 2006 12:32 pm

Congratulations on the new addition, I'm sure it will be the first of many! I need to make some to keep now, but it's difficult not to have a little taste.
The collander cheese has been a great favourite, it's much softer and creamier, flavour is there but with a nice background taste of mushrooms.

Enjoy your cheese Wohoki

cheers

Jen
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Postby Wohoki » Tue May 23, 2006 7:52 pm

Sadly, my rotten kids got to it, poked it, dropped it, MURDERED it.

Back to the milk-pan, ho hum. :lol:
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