Ricotta from UHT milk?

Recipes and techniques for soft cheese.

Ricotta from UHT milk?

Postby grisell » Sun Mar 14, 2010 9:21 pm

Can I make ricotta from UHT goat milk in the same way it's made from ordinary cow milk? It's only 2% fat.
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Postby saucisson » Tue Mar 16, 2010 10:11 am

I think its certainly worth trying a single carton as an experiment.

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Postby grisell » Tue Mar 16, 2010 11:07 pm

Thanks, I probably will! Has anyone tried ricotta from goat's milk? The thing is that I love chêvre but I'm not very fond of fresh goat's milk. So I guess this is something in between(?).

Should I use citric acid or rennet or both? How much salt if any?

If it works out well, I'll post some pictures.
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Postby culinairezaken » Tue Mar 16, 2010 11:26 pm

hi,

in the past i worked in a small cheesefarm. I know they used Calcium Chloride for a better curd.

maybe you can search on the web for this?
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Postby grisell » Wed Mar 17, 2010 12:16 am

Ok, thanks!
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Postby saucisson » Wed Mar 17, 2010 12:54 am

Ask away, everyone is very helpful down here in cheeses :lol:

Truth be told I sometimes come down here for a rest :wink:

Every cheese I make is completely different, some are awesome, some are rubbish, I put the time and effort into creating them and they seem to ignore me and become what they want :)

Just like children I guess :lol:

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Last edited by saucisson on Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby jenny_haddow » Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:30 pm

I use calcium chloride to achieve a good curd. I first used it making goats cheese and it works well.

I can't make cheese at the moment as I have two enthusuastic kittens who would see it as cat heaven come down to earth!

HTH

Jen
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Postby grisell » Wed May 05, 2010 10:54 pm

I finally tried 'goat ricotta' (maybe it could be called Capricotta :D ).

I used 500 cc UHT goat milk from the supermarket, 50 cc yoghurt and 50 cc heavy cream. I added the heavy cream because the goat milk is only 1.6 % fat. Brought it to a boil and added ½ tsp citric acid (which was probably unnecessary). It separated within a minute. Then drained for one hour in a cheese cloth.

Here is the result. The little snow white nugget weighs only 110 gms.

Image

Then I rolled it in sea salt and Herbes de Provence.

Image

Tomorrow I will try it. The goat milk costs £2/$3, so it won't pay but if it turns out well it could be a great gift on a dinner party.
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Postby wheels » Wed May 05, 2010 11:37 pm

Excuse my ignorance (I don't often venture as far as Cheese) but I thought that Ricotta was made from the whey left over from making another cheese?

I bought some rennet, but have never got around to making any cheese with it. I make paneer, but never think that this counts as 'proper' cheese! I don't no why I make it, because it costs me more for the milk than I could buy it for locally. I guess that I do it just because...

Phil

Added: By the way, that's looks superb Grisell; home-made crackers or bread with that spread on then topped with a bit of smoked salmon... Mmm...
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Postby grisell » Thu May 06, 2010 12:27 am

You are completely right. Thanks. I didn't think about that. Genuine ricotta is made from whey. However, the process involves coagulation of the caseine at >80 C. This one is made the same way but not genuine since it contains the milk itself. Maybe I should call it Cottagoat Cheese instead. :D
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Postby wheels » Thu May 06, 2010 2:26 pm

Grisell

I didn't ask to be pedantic, just to check that I was correct about ricotta, I'm sure it will taste good whatever you call it.

Phil
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Postby grisell » Thu May 06, 2010 10:19 pm

No problem, Phil. I understood that.
I had a bite today, and it seems to develop well. I liked the aftertaste a lot. I will wait two more days before trying again.
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Postby wheels » Thu May 06, 2010 11:09 pm

If we can transfer money online why can't we do the same with ham and cheese? :lol: :lol: :lol:
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