Harvesting mould from commercial salami

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Harvesting mould from commercial salami

Postby grisell » Mon Oct 03, 2011 12:37 pm

Mould is traditionally used as a preservative on cheese and salami, but the mould must be the 'right' mould. There are thousands of mould strains and several of these produce poisonous or carcinogenic toxins when growing. They can also spoil the taste of the product. The chance of getting the right mould strain spontaneously when drying a salami is actually very small.

To make certain that the right mould is produced, one should inoculate. This is no more strange than adding yeast to a bread dough or homemade beer. There are mould cultures that can be bought from the Internet, but the cheapest and most natural method is to harvest the mould from a commercial salami. That gives a possibilty to select the culture from the whole array of available products. The mould is responsible for much of the aroma of the final product, so here is the opportunity to adapt one's product to one that is already on the market.


Method:

Choose a salami with live mould. Live mould looks white and chalky. You only need the skin. Maybe you can get the skin for free in your deli. You will need a patch the size of a stamp. Patches of skin can be stored refrigerated in a sealed jar for later use. They will keep for months.

Bring half a cup of bottled or otherwise unchlorinated water to a boil (to sterilize). Add one teaspoon sugar. Let cool to body temperature. Add the salami skin patch. Cover and let stand in room temperature for 6-12 hours. Discard the skin. Dilute the solution with sufficient unchlorinated water to fill an atomizer.

Immediately after stuffing, spray generously of the solution onto your salami (the solution should not be added to the stuffing!). Hang the salami to ferment according to the instructions in your recipe. The conditions for fermentation are also ideal for the mould growth, i.e. 20-27 C/68-80 F and 90+ % relative humidity (these conditions can be attained in different ways; I use a disconnected refrigerator with door closed and a hung up wet terry towel). Repeat spraying the solution onto your products a few times during fermentation. Avoid touching the skins. The sausages must hang freely or else the mould will not cover them totally.

After 2-3 days, depending on temperature, you should be able to see a diffuse greyish coating on the casings. This is the mould. Probably by now, the fermentation is ready too.

The salamis can now be moved to the drying chamber. The mould will be fully grown after about a week. Until then, avoid disturbing it. When full-grown, the mould is extremely resistant and the salamis can be touched with bare hands.

Note: If black or dark grey spots appear during the first days, brush them with a little distilled vinegar. These spots of unwanted mould strains tend to form around specks of dirt or dust and can be avoided by keeping good hygienic standards during stuffing.
André

I have a simple taste - I'm always satisfied with the best.
grisell
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Re: Harvesting mould from commercial salami

Postby moldy meat » Tue Apr 26, 2016 12:54 am

does anyone have any insight as to how to store this mold solution? or for how long it is good for safe use?

MM
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Re: Harvesting mould from commercial salami

Postby grisell » Thu Apr 28, 2016 2:29 pm

I don't know. I make a new solution for every batch.
André

I have a simple taste - I'm always satisfied with the best.
grisell
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Posts: 3162
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2009 6:17 pm
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

Re: Harvesting mould from commercial salami

Postby moldy meat » Thu Apr 28, 2016 11:06 pm

grisell wrote:I don't know. I make a new solution for every batch.


thanks, i found a blog where the guy mentions storing his solution in the fridge, but nothing specific as to how long it is good for.

MM
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