more transplanting

Producing herbs, spices and vegetable matter

more transplanting

Postby Big Guy » Sat Apr 24, 2010 12:24 am

Tomatoes before

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after, there goes miss needles living room again

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garden 150'x150', full of weeds, I need to get the tiller in there, still a little early though

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my garlic beds

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bed #2

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my rhubarb

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in the green house

peppers

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onions and leeks

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a splash of colour

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Postby NCPaul » Sun Apr 25, 2010 3:07 am

What types of tomatoes and peppers are you growing this year?
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Postby Big Guy » Sun Apr 25, 2010 11:04 am

I'm growing "ultra sonic" , "Early Girl", "jubilee", and "grape" tomatoes.

Sweet peppers I have Early Prolific, fat and sassy, mixed colour bell. Declaration.
hot peppers are jalepeno (9000 sc), serrano (20,000 sc),and big chili (2000 sc)
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Postby saucisson » Sun Apr 25, 2010 2:19 pm

I'm attempting some Dorset Naga's this year :)

Dave
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Postby NCPaul » Sun Apr 25, 2010 6:40 pm

That pepper will make you a ghost. :shock: I've watched enough youtube videos of people eating them to not want to waste garden space trying to grow one. Can you actually eat something that hot?
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Postby dave zac » Sun Apr 25, 2010 7:15 pm

Big Guy,

What do you do to keep the seedlings from getting too spindly? The ones in the cans look like they are getting that way. Does it matter? I ask because I am starting plants indoors this year for the first time. Some of my squash, cucumber and tomatoes are a lot of stem - 3-4". The larger plants I transplanted from the original flat to peat pots for now. I have 4 weeks until I can get them in the ground though. Can you slow down the spindly growth?

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Postby saucisson » Sun Apr 25, 2010 9:50 pm

NCPaul wrote:That pepper will make you a ghost. :shock: I've watched enough youtube videos of people eating them to not want to waste garden space trying to grow one. Can you actually eat something that hot?


No idea, but I like a challenge :) I reckon one would give me enough heat for 10,000 curries so could be interesting :)
Curing is not an exact science... So it's not a sin to bin.

Great hams, from little acorns grow...
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Postby Big Guy » Sun Apr 25, 2010 11:27 pm

dave zac wrote:Big Guy,

What do you do to keep the seedlings from getting too spindly? The ones in the cans look like they are getting that way. Does it matter? I ask because I am starting plants indoors this year for the first time. Some of my squash, cucumber and tomatoes are a lot of stem - 3-4". The larger plants I transplanted from the original flat to peat pots for now. I have 4 weeks until I can get them in the ground though. Can you slow down the spindly growth?

Dave


Yes they start to get spindly, that means they are not getting enough light. I transplant them and bury the spindly stalk, after a week i'll transfer the transplants into my green house witch gets lots of light. They really like to be transplanted . That spindly stalk grows into a fantastic root system if burried.
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