NCPaul's Garden Beds

Producing herbs, spices and vegetable matter

NCPaul's Garden Beds

Postby NCPaul » Sat May 15, 2010 11:48 pm

I thought I would share what and how I grow. I thought I would wait until my garden looked perfect, then I realized it never does. :D New things are starting while other things are going to seed. The raised beds require very little weeding which is key to my effort (or lack thereof).

Tomatoes:

Image

Carrots:

Image

Pole Beans:

Image

Herbs:

Image

More herbs:

Image

More pots:

Image

Vegetable bed:

Image


Image

Vegetable bed:

Image
Fashionably late will be stylishly hungry.
NCPaul
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2304
Joined: Thu Oct 01, 2009 12:58 am
Location: North Carolina

Postby Big Guy » Sun May 16, 2010 12:37 am

Nice little garden. :D
User avatar
Big Guy
Registered Member
 
Posts: 1240
Joined: Fri Jan 27, 2006 2:31 am
Location: Southampton, Ontario,Canada/Floral city Florida

Postby NCPaul » Thu Jun 24, 2010 11:53 pm

An update after a month or so -
Cucumbers on the way -

Image

The ones I've already picked have been turned into 6 pints of bread and butter pickles and 4 pints of relish (2 plants).

Image

The summer squash is coming fast now (two plants; one next year).

Image

Snow peas, maybe a stir fry with the summer squash? I planted a second crop 3 weeks after the first.

Image

"Delicata" squash, I use these for ravioli.

Image

Fennel bulb almost ready. I like this sliced very thinly against the grain (sideways) with an equal amount of celery sliced very thinly and mixed with lemon juice, salt and pepper (orange segments optional). A great summer salad after a heavy meal.

Image
Fashionably late will be stylishly hungry.
NCPaul
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2304
Joined: Thu Oct 01, 2009 12:58 am
Location: North Carolina

Postby beardedwonder5 » Fri Jun 25, 2010 9:24 am

I could airfreight you about 50 rabbits. You then wouldn't have to do any trimming or pruning.
GOS, yeah!!!
beardedwonder5
Registered Member
 
Posts: 342
Joined: Thu Feb 28, 2008 10:21 am
Location: Canterbury, Kent, UK

Postby NCPaul » Sun Jul 11, 2010 5:08 pm

My Blue Lake pole beans have cleared my deck rail, 12 feet (3.7 m). I have to use a ladder to pick some of them. :D

Image
Fashionably late will be stylishly hungry.
NCPaul
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2304
Joined: Thu Oct 01, 2009 12:58 am
Location: North Carolina

Postby NCPaul » Fri Aug 27, 2010 11:46 pm

I planted 4 okra plants and they are now 5 feet tall (in far raised bed). Still getting a few tomatoes (though a poor year for them), eggplant is starting (large plant in near bed, planted it late) and peppers ("corno de toro").

Image

Image

I'll have to make some decisions soon as to what I want for fall plants.
Fashionably late will be stylishly hungry.
NCPaul
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2304
Joined: Thu Oct 01, 2009 12:58 am
Location: North Carolina

Postby Jogeephus » Sun Aug 29, 2010 1:17 am

Fantastic job Paul. I like your utilization.
Patience please, I'm just trying to get on the learning curve.
Jogeephus
Registered Member
 
Posts: 380
Joined: Mon Dec 07, 2009 12:17 pm
Location: Nashville, Georgia USA

Postby NCPaul » Sat Oct 30, 2010 12:43 am

I got the book you recommended Jogeephus and found that I already use many of his practices. :D I have started to add vermiculite and moss to my beds for moisture control.

I'm trying for a second crop of green beans and it will be close against the first frost:



Image

I have my garlic in (first time trying) Lorz Italian for next Spring:

Image


It's a much smaller patch of garlic than Big Guy's but should meet my small needs. :D One of the pleasures of small scale gardening is the harvest, of course, but I am thinking that the growing process and the potential is as satisfying. I check my plants every day and get to see them grow day by day, harvest is just the end of the process. The daily growth, especially at the start, is every bit as exciting. I get to feel the sun and worry about the rain even if my investment and effort are small. It's good for me to feel a connection to my food, without having to depend my gardening skills. :D
Fashionably late will be stylishly hungry.
NCPaul
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2304
Joined: Thu Oct 01, 2009 12:58 am
Location: North Carolina

Postby Chuckwagon » Sat Oct 30, 2010 12:54 am

Paul, That's impressive! And a lot of work pal. I noticed that you allow your rusty rhinosaurahorse in your garden. Don't you fear for the carrots?
Best wishes, Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, quacks like a duck, and walks like a duck, it probably needs a little more time on the grill.
Chuckwagon
Registered Member
 
Posts: 642
Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 4:14 am
Location: Rocky Mountains

Postby NCPaul » Sat Oct 30, 2010 2:26 am

The hippo ( or "rhinosaururahorse") protects my garden from squirels, rabbits and "Great Salt Lake Nocturnal Tuna Fish" (a more dangerous predator). You don't see any of them around do you? :D I'll pull the carrots in a couple of weeks and show how they came out. I'll have to find your brittle recipe for the few peanuts I planted. :D
Fashionably late will be stylishly hungry.
NCPaul
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2304
Joined: Thu Oct 01, 2009 12:58 am
Location: North Carolina

Postby Sam Newman » Fri Nov 12, 2010 9:56 am

8) 8) 8) Very Cool 8) 8) 8)
Got to Love those raised beds.
You can lead a dog to water, but you can't make him a horse.
User avatar
Sam Newman
Registered Member
 
Posts: 363
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2010 3:08 am
Location: Raetea Forest, Maungataniwha Ranges, Far North of Aotearoa New Zealand

Postby NCPaul » Sun Nov 14, 2010 6:38 pm

Paul picks and pickles a peck of peppers (actually a quarter peck, I had to look up that unit of measurement).

Image

Image

I do love having raised beds Sam, there's a lot to be said for not farming at ground level. :D
Fashionably late will be stylishly hungry.
NCPaul
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2304
Joined: Thu Oct 01, 2009 12:58 am
Location: North Carolina

Postby johnfb » Sun Nov 14, 2010 6:56 pm

Nice collection there Paul

Could I ask you to post your pickle recipes and Chutney recipes. I am making lots of jams , pickles and chutney at the moment and am always on the lookout for new recipes

thanks
John
User avatar
johnfb
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2422
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2007 10:03 am
Location: Dublin, Ireland

Postby NCPaul » Mon Nov 15, 2010 12:39 pm

1 Kg sliced peppers
1.5 L white vinegar
0.5 L water
Pack peppers into 500 mL sterlized jars or smaller. Boil pickling liquid then immediately cover peppers leaving 1-2 cm of head space. Seal jars and process in boiling water for 10 minutes. I use recipes from the "Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving". Their recipes are also expressed in metric units. I never deviate from their instructions. Maybe Santa could get you this book? :D
Fashionably late will be stylishly hungry.
NCPaul
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2304
Joined: Thu Oct 01, 2009 12:58 am
Location: North Carolina

Postby johnfb » Mon Nov 15, 2010 5:22 pm

Thanks Paul, I will have a quiet word with Santa about this :lol:
User avatar
johnfb
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2422
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2007 10:03 am
Location: Dublin, Ireland


Return to Grow your own

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest