Memphis Dry Rub for Pork (Oven)

Postby SausageBoy » Tue Feb 28, 2012 7:15 pm

grisell wrote:How do you recommend to serve them?


What to serve with them?

More ribs!!! LOL

:D

I like either fries or baked potato and coleslaw.


:wink:
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Postby ericrice » Tue Feb 28, 2012 7:55 pm

grisell wrote:Okay! I'll give it a try, then. The American way... :D


Andre' - if you go with BBQ sauce that should be put on the last 30 minutes or so or it will get burnt (not sure if that was clear). For me I have also found they come out much better in a moist environment. When I'm smoking them I have a pan of water and baste every 45 minutes to an hour. When doing in the oven still a pan of water but I also do them sealed in foil with a bit of liquid (apple juice, beer, etc) and remove from foil near the end of cooking to apply the BBQ sauce. The foil method is great cause I can start them early, hit the pub for a few hours or more and they are ready for me when I get home.
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Postby vagreys » Tue Feb 28, 2012 7:57 pm

SausageBoy wrote:...225° C (437° F) is the magic 'charred cinder' temperature!! LOL



8)

Thanks for that! I nearly sprayed my coffee everywhere...
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Postby vagreys » Tue Feb 28, 2012 8:13 pm

grisell wrote:...Will they get any colour at such a low temp as 225 F/107 C? That's close to steaming temperature. On the other hand, with that amount of sugar, they would probably get burnt after 1½ hours at 225 C(?). Or...? :?

The temp is, indeed, 225°F. Being close to steaming temperature (but not quite there) is a key element of low and slow barbecue.

Remember that we are talking about American spareribs, not loin back ribs or baby backs. Spareribs need to be cooked low and slow to be succulent, tender and sweet. Loin back ribs can be cooked faster and substantially higher temperatures without suffering, although they become something special when cooked low and slow, too.

If you cook these ribs as directed, they will certainly develop color, with or without sugar in the rub. If the color isn't sufficient, you can always finish them under the broiler or on the grill.

You can certainly serve a table sauce with these ribs, but the whole point of dry rub is that, done properly, they don't need anything else. I don't use sauce on dry rub ribs, myself, but I offer several sauces for friends to use at table.

As for sides, I usually offer a selection of sauces and sides for my friends at one of my Sacred Pig events, including a simple, mayonnaise-based potato salad, fries/chips, crisps, creamy or red slaw, mac salad, baked beans, beer-batter onion rings, sweet corn muffins.
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Postby salumi512 » Tue Feb 28, 2012 8:36 pm

If we are talking about "proper" American spare ribs then here is how they should look when done, but you won't get this in an oven. These were cooked on my pit, with no sauce at all. Just dry rub and low, slow smoke.

[img]<a%20href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/ffWAzA2tJvnPr4GBs-O-fkiEJhRwJA-X2PHRQP0soL8?feat=embedwebsite"><img%20src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-Nt_rP_wEgY8/T006Cr69_nI/AAAAAAAABA8/2FeXQ8evrjg/s800/No%2520sauce%2520here.jpg"%20height="600"%20width="800"></a>[/img]
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Postby BriCan » Tue Feb 28, 2012 10:01 pm

salumi512 wrote:If we are talking about "proper" American spare ribs then here is how they should look when done, but you won't get this in an oven. These were cooked on my pit, with no sauce at all. Just dry rub and low, slow smoke.

[img]<a%20href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/ffWAzA2tJvnPr4GBs-O-fkiEJhRwJA-X2PHRQP0soL8?feat=embedwebsite"><img%20src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-Nt_rP_wEgY8/T006Cr69_nI/AAAAAAAABA8/2FeXQ8evrjg/s800/No%2520sauce%2520here.jpg"%20height="600"%20width="800"></a>[/img]


You do know that I can go off people real quick :lol: :lol:
But what do I know
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Postby salumi512 » Tue Feb 28, 2012 10:11 pm

BriCan wrote:You do know that I can go off people real quick :lol: :lol:


I don't know what that means, but it has smileys, so ok. I think I need a translation. I'm still learning proper english ;)
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Postby BriCan » Tue Feb 28, 2012 11:33 pm

salumi512 wrote:
BriCan wrote:You do know that I can go off people real quick :lol: :lol:


I don't know what that means, but it has smileys, so ok. I think I need a translation. I'm still learning proper english ;)


Tom introduced me to 'real' ribs when he was up this way, not being a rib person (I'm steak a potato -- need sum'ert to stick to the ribs so to speak) and being a 'good' Englishman i gave the ribs Tom cooked to the misses with the instructions of leaving me 1 rib to try :cry: :cry: :cry:

I should have been a North American and ate them all myself and not said anything :roll:

The above reminds me what I could have had hence the remark :lol: :lol:
But what do I know
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Postby salumi512 » Wed Feb 29, 2012 12:04 am

BriCan wrote:Tom introduced me to 'real' ribs when he was up this way, not being a rib person (I'm steak a potato -- need sum'ert to stick to the ribs so to speak) and being a 'good' Englishman i gave the ribs Tom cooked to the misses with the instructions of leaving me 1 rib to try :cry: :cry: :cry:

I should have been a North American and ate them all myself and not said anything :roll:

The above reminds me what I could have had hence the remark :lol: :lol:


I remember that thread. It seems you have learned your lesson ;) And, I must say that the bacon I have hanging right now will only be cold smoked. So good job to this forum.
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Postby grisell » Wed Feb 29, 2012 11:11 am

I tried it yesterday. Swedish spareribs are much thicker than yours (sometimes one can find the thin ones too). Anyway, it worked great. The piece weighed 1,300 gram/3 lbs. It took two hours in the oven at around 110 C/230 F to reach 66 C/151 F internal temperature (the degree of doneness I prefer with pork).

I served it with fries and garlic butter (excuse the sacrilege - it's a common accompaniment to meat here). I ate it all myself. :oops: The only thing is that it was a little too much cumin for my taste. Next time I will reduce it to one teaspoon.

I did think about the balanced diet chart - note the cucumber! :D

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Postby ericrice » Wed Feb 29, 2012 12:58 pm

grisell wrote:I did think about the balanced diet chart - note the cucumber! :D


Love it!!

They look great. Not sure of the difference based on your cut of ribs but only cooking to that temp I would tend to think they wouldn't get to the "fall off the bone" stage (although that is another debated topic over here). Were they still a bit chewy (like a pork chop)?
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Postby grisell » Wed Feb 29, 2012 2:52 pm

They were tender, just the way I wanted them. I ate everything except the bones (which made up about a tenth of the total weight). There was no problem to chew it.
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Postby SausageBoy » Wed Feb 29, 2012 3:00 pm

Looks good!!!
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Postby vagreys » Wed Feb 29, 2012 8:00 pm

grisell wrote:I tried it yesterday. Swedish spareribs are much thicker than yours (sometimes one can find the thin ones too). Anyway, it worked great...

Glad you liked it! That's a beautiful plate. I noticed the green! I've used the rub to make a fresh sausage. I've also made up a batch, leaving out the sugar, as a rub on pork shoulder steaks for grilling. Lots of ways to use rubs like that.

In slow cooking pork, especially pieces with a fair amount of connective tissue, something special happens when the internal temperature of the meat slowly rises to between 76.6°C and 82.2°C. The connective tissue dissolves and the meat goes very tender. It has to slowly rise to this temperature, though. If you cook the meat rapidly to this temperature, it will just be dry and tough. You may want to give it a try, sometime. I cook picnic shoulder to an internal temp of 76.6°C, remove it to rest and allow the temperature to approach 82.2°C. It goes amazingly tender and juicy.
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Postby wheels » Wed Feb 29, 2012 8:17 pm

Somewhere on here I think that the science behind this is explained. IIRC it was related to cooking a brisket.

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