Memphis Dry Rub for Pork (Oven)

Postby grisell » Wed Feb 29, 2012 9:06 pm

Ok, I will consider that. I'm normally not a fan of overcooked meat, but I might give it a try with these thick ribs sometime.
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Postby wheels » Wed Feb 29, 2012 9:10 pm

...and therein lies the problem. You're thinking of it as overcooked. We'll have to get one of our US members to send you a bbq mind-set! :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Postby grisell » Wed Feb 29, 2012 9:51 pm

Unfortunately, my results so far of cooking pork to 75 C and more haven't been too encouraging to be honest... :(

But it may be a totally different matter with ribs (and slow heating like vagreys suggested above). We'll see. I'll give it at try.
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Postby ericrice » Thu Mar 01, 2012 3:31 pm

Andre' - to be honest I had always had the same mindset as I enjoy all my meats "juicy". Steaks and burgers are done rare or pittsburg rare (very high heat, charred outside, almost raw inside) for me. Cooking anything too long just didn't seem appealing to me. However after giving it a try I have found it is the only way to go for pulled pork shoulder and ribs. Done right they will remain very juicy and moist - ribs done right are about as oist as it gets to be honest.
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Postby vagreys » Thu Mar 01, 2012 3:51 pm

I just realized that I never posted the smoker version of this rub. Huh. Off to do that...
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Postby Vindii » Thu Mar 01, 2012 4:28 pm

grisell wrote:Unfortunately, my results so far of cooking pork to 75 C and more haven't been too encouraging to be honest... :(

But it may be a totally different matter with ribs (and slow heating like vagreys suggested above). We'll see. I'll give it at try.


I think you'll find it different for pork ribs, beef ribs, brisket, and pork shoulder. All of those can be cooked to 195-210F ish.

Your biggest challenge doing them in an oven may be keeping them moist. You may need to wrap them in foil for part of the cook time.
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Postby grisell » Thu Mar 01, 2012 5:58 pm

Vindii wrote:[--- ]
Your biggest challenge doing them in an oven may be keeping them moist. You may need to wrap them in foil for part of the cook time.


Hmm... Wrapping them sort of removes the charm with an oven. :? I was thinking more in terms of spraying the meat from time to time with a Liquid Smoke solution. I have a 1:10 water solution in an atomizer that I use on steaks. That works great as a fake bbq flavor. What do you think about that?
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Postby Vindii » Thu Mar 01, 2012 6:38 pm

grisell wrote:
Vindii wrote:[--- ]
Your biggest challenge doing them in an oven may be keeping them moist. You may need to wrap them in foil for part of the cook time.


Hmm... Wrapping them sort of removes the charm with an oven. :? I was thinking more in terms of spraying the meat from time to time with a Liquid Smoke solution. I have a 1:10 water solution in an atomizer that I use on steaks. That works great as a fake bbq flavor. What do you think about that?


Some people spray rib even in the smoker. My smoker holds moisture very well be design so I don't wrap or spray. I think the charcoal adds some moisture also. Your oven won't so you might need to compensate for that.

I'm just thinking out loud as I've never done them in the oven. Only in the smoker.

Maybe a water pan might be another option? For spare ribs I think I would cook them for 3 hours and wrap them for 2 and then unwrap for the past hour to sauce if you like. That last hour will will help firm up the outside.

It tough to cook ribs by using a temp probe. I prefer to see how easy they bend and if the bone is starting to come lose. I prefer mine fall off the bone which by competition standard is overcooked. That how most of my family and friend like them too.
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Postby ericrice » Thu Mar 01, 2012 7:23 pm

In the colder months when I don't feel like watching the smoker for hours on end (it's a lot more fun in the summer with beers at hand) - I do use the oven and I do wrap in foil with a bit of liquid for the first 3+ hours, if I'm home unwrapped for about 2 more and the last 30-45 minutes apply BBQ sauce if I am doing that. There are also times I'll let them go in the foil for 5 hours unattended and when I get home unwrap for a bit as there will be lots of liquid in the foil (be careful). I do also keep a pan of water in the bottom of the oven.

I would definately suggest the foil method if doing them in the oven.
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Postby ericrice » Thu Mar 01, 2012 7:28 pm

[/quote]
For spare ribs I think I would cook them for 3 hours and wrap them for 2 and then unwrap for the past hour to sauce if you like. That last hour will will help firm up the outside.
[/quote]

Vindii - I've tried several different methods and in the beginning had varying degrees of success but was never thrilled, then I tried the 3,2,1 method - consistently great ribs and I haven't looked back!!
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Postby vagreys » Thu Mar 01, 2012 8:42 pm

If you cook them at 225°F (107.2°C), the ribs will not dry out. You should not need to spray them or cover them, if you cook them low and slow. If you decide to cook them faster, you risk drying them out and making them tough. Properly done, spareribs take patience.

The smoked paprika is there to provide a subtle smokiness. Memphis-style barbecue does not call for heavy smoke.

Because the Swedish ribs are not the same cut as American spareribs and are a thicker cut of meat, you cannot use the exposed bone as an indication of doneness. You will have to cook them at 107.2°C to an internal temperature of 76.6°C, remove them from the oven and let them sit and rise to a temperature of 82.2°C. As a starting point, assume about 4 hours per kg, for cooking.

I know you think I'm setting you up for lousy food, André, but there are a number of folks, here, who can assure that I'm not.

ETA: Whether or not to use water is an on-going debate, mostly between northerners and southerners. It all depends on how you want the meat - falling off the bone with a soft texture (with water), or pulling clean from the bone with a satisfying chew (without water). Both are valid, just with different results.
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Postby Vindii » Thu Mar 01, 2012 9:34 pm

My opinion is that the type of smoker or cooker has a something to do with them drying out or not. I don't think just cooking at 225 will produce the same results in any type of cooker.

Kamado style smoker seem to hold moisture well. Bullet styles like the weber smokey mountain seem to need water pans or wrapping to help keep moisture in. If you do them in a gas grill you may end up with jerky if you don't wrap them at some point.

Lots of different ways and thoughts. It worth the time to figure out as once you get them right they are great.
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Postby grisell » Fri Mar 02, 2012 10:37 am

Hmmm... :? Temperature around boiling point, moisture, long time, internal temperature of 82 C...

When I went to catering school, we called that braising. In this case I could just use a cast iron pot with a little liquid and lid on, or...? That'd be much more practical, but then I wouldn't call it barbecue. What's the difference then between this bbq method and braising? :?
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Postby NCPaul » Fri Mar 02, 2012 12:32 pm

You are on the right track grisell, Chris Schlesinger and John Willoughby in The Thrill of the Grill called barbeque "braising with smoke". I cook my spareribs in a bullet type smoker (WSM) and usually go 8-10 hours with water in the pan below the ribs. I haven't checked the temperature of the ribs; instead I watch for them to go wet on the surface (same doneness as vagreys cooks them to). :D
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Postby salumi512 » Fri Mar 02, 2012 1:49 pm

grisell wrote:Hmmm... :? Temperature around boiling point, moisture, long time, internal temperature of 82 C...

When I went to catering school, we called that braising. In this case I could just use a cast iron pot with a little liquid and lid on, or...? That'd be much more practical, but then I wouldn't call it barbecue. What's the difference then between this bbq method and braising? :?


If it doesn't have smoke, it isn't BBQ. None of these oven techniques are BBQ, they are just different ways to cook ribs in an oven.
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