Dr Dave's Dangerous Dough

All about bread

Postby saucisson » Tue Sep 16, 2008 9:23 pm

The wonder toy of many improvers is the enzyme amylase (often the secret ingredient). It converts starch to sugar, so theoretically keeps feeding the yeast sugar for the extra boost, and I played with that too.

Imagine my horror when I found wheels recipe didn't even have sugar in it...

I'm a convert

:D
Curing is not an exact science... So it's not a sin to bin.

Great hams, from little acorns grow...
User avatar
saucisson
Site Admin
 
Posts: 6772
Joined: Sat Mar 04, 2006 8:46 pm
Location: Oxford UK

Postby johnfb » Wed Sep 17, 2008 6:42 am

I hate to say it......but..... :lol: :P

Another home run for Wheels.

Have a look at this baby from Wheels...uses the same blend..
http://www.localfoodheroes.co.uk/weblog ... =my_weblog


Dave, did you cook those in muffin tins???
What weight did you give each dough ball before putting them into the tins.
It looks like a good idea and one I will try out.

John
User avatar
johnfb
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2422
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2007 10:03 am
Location: Dublin, Ireland

Postby Gordon » Wed Sep 17, 2008 9:15 am

I'm not sure but from my brewing exploits doesn't amylase occur naturally in the flour as diastase ?

It converts the startches to maltose and then the maltose to glucose ready for the yeast to 'eat' producing carbon dioxide and alcohol in equal weights. The process is much the same for beer and bread, I suppose bread is just realy thick cloudy beer :lol:
<a>Chop On Line </a>
Gordon
Registered Member
 
Posts: 167
Joined: Sat Dec 16, 2006 1:35 pm
Location: Southend, Essex, UK

Postby saucisson » Wed Sep 17, 2008 9:22 pm

John, it's a large (american style) muffin tin. It's Wheels's 600g flour recipe divided into six balls of dough to drop into the tin.
Curing is not an exact science... So it's not a sin to bin.

Great hams, from little acorns grow...
User avatar
saucisson
Site Admin
 
Posts: 6772
Joined: Sat Mar 04, 2006 8:46 pm
Location: Oxford UK

Postby saucisson » Wed Sep 17, 2008 9:25 pm

Gordon wrote:I'm not sure but from my brewing exploits doesn't amylase occur naturally in the flour as diastase ?

It converts the startches to maltose and then the maltose to glucose ready for the yeast to 'eat' producing carbon dioxide and alcohol in equal weights. The process is much the same for beer and bread, I suppose bread is just realy thick cloudy beer :lol:


I think it resides largely in the wheatgerm, so there is very little in commercially produced white flour, but presumably is there in wholemeal flours.
Curing is not an exact science... So it's not a sin to bin.

Great hams, from little acorns grow...
User avatar
saucisson
Site Admin
 
Posts: 6772
Joined: Sat Mar 04, 2006 8:46 pm
Location: Oxford UK

Postby beardedwonder5 » Wed Feb 25, 2009 6:34 pm

"The Village Baker" states that, contrary to common assumption, soya flour is a permitted additive in normal (i.e., baguette style) French bread. (See a few posts back.)
GOS, yeah!!!
beardedwonder5
Registered Member
 
Posts: 342
Joined: Thu Feb 28, 2008 10:21 am
Location: Canterbury, Kent, UK

Previous

Return to Bread Making

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest