Sourdough bread question

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Sourdough bread question

Postby 5thElement » Wed Jul 08, 2009 10:00 pm

I fancy trying to make some sourdough bread but im unsure how to go about it..

I know to make a starter i'm basically adding equal parts of flour and water into a jar...leaving it a day or so, tipping half of it out and then adding more flour/water and continuing until it starts foaming/frothing up.

Is this the general idea?

My main question is, what do i do with it after that? how much starter do i need to use per x amount of grams of flour/water to make a dough?

I found this recipe so was going to use this, but wanted to invite any other suggestions!

http://allrecipes.co.uk/recipe/2791/sou ... bread.aspx

Most other recipes i've found are american and weighed in "cups" etc

Any help would be appreciated.
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Postby wheels » Wed Jul 08, 2009 10:49 pm

5thElement

There's good instructions for sourdough starter here:

http://www.wildyeastblog.com/2007/07/13 ... a-starter/

If you don't want to use rye or malted flour I've done this with just white flour and it works fine. On one occasion I had to throw it away as it smelt awful after a couple of days - it will, of course, have a strong beery smell when it's OK.

Most sourdough loaves seem to have more liquid than the one you post - you could use/adapt one from the link above instead. This one looks a good starting point:

http://www.wildyeastblog.com/2007/07/08 ... sourdough/

I'm not keen on a too sour taste (or any sour taste at all for that matter) so instead of using the 360gm of starter, the day before I would make up a mixture of equal parts flour and water with 2 Tablespoons of starter to use instead (that's 2 tablespoon of starter with equal parts flour and water added to make 360gm). Leave this in a warmish place overnight.

Phil
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Postby 5thElement » Thu Jul 09, 2009 7:22 pm

Hi Wheels,

Thanks for those links, i'll take a look at them in a moment.

Another question, slightly off topic, i just finished a 5 gallon homebrew beer and bottled it today and in the fermenting vessel i'm left with a load of sediment/sludge and wondering if i could use that as a basis of some kind of bread hmm, must still have some active yeast in it. I guess i'll stick some in a jar before i clean it out and have a read about.
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Postby wheels » Thu Jul 09, 2009 7:43 pm

I'm sure you could see:

http://www.danlepard.com/forum/viewtopi ... light=barm

Hope this helps

Phil
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Keep it simple

Postby realcoolchris » Sat Jul 11, 2009 6:26 pm

The making of sourdough bread, like that of mayonnaise, is always invested with an unnecessary degree of difficulty.

First get your starter going. Keep it in an airtight box in the fridge and feed it every couple of weeks with flour and water.

When you want to make a loaf, take the starter out the night before and add a tablespoonful of the starter to roughly 175g flour and 75g water (1 third boiling water & 2 thirds at room temp will give you the correct temperature). There's no need to be very precise - you want a thickish dough but not too dry. Cover & leave overnight till it's active - full of bubbles and growing.

Use this Dan Lepard recipe- 300g white bread flour, 250g wholemeal, 50g rye flour, 10g salt, 250g of your sourdough ferment and 275g water.

Mix together and then knead for 10-15 seconds every 15 minutes. DL does this about 5 or 6 times but my bread usually gets 3, maybe 4 kneadings.

Spreads small amount of oil on the worksurface and knead onto that, so that the percentage of flour/water doesn't change.

Keep the dough in a covered bowl between kneadings and then let it rise in the bowl until roughly doubled in size. This depends very much on the ambient temperature; it can take just a few hours in summer or quite a few hours in winter.

When risen, shape into a loaf, put onto a floured tray and again leave to double in size. Spray with water, slash the top with a razorblade and bake in a hot oven for 40-50 mins. I use 240 deg C but I like a dark loaf. You can turn it down to 200 for the last 20 mins of cooking.

The important thing is not to believe all the myths about how hard it is to make sourdough; sure, it's slower and trickier than with bread yeast but you don't need greater skill; just more patience
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Postby wheels » Sat Jul 11, 2009 6:32 pm

realcoolchris

Nice recipe ...and I couldn't agree more with your comments. :D

Phil
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