Pasta flour bread using Panasonic machines

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Pasta flour bread using Panasonic machines

Postby JuliaBalbilla » Sat Aug 22, 2009 9:26 am

Has anyone tried making bread with half very strong white flour and half hard pasta flour? I have done so, very successfully, using the French bread setting on my Panasonic.

However, a friend (who also has a Panasonic) tried same without success. I think it is to do with the type of pasta flour used. I always used the same type. See http://www.cookipedia.co.uk/wiki/index. ... trigo_duro for recipe and picture of the flour I use.

This flour is not easy to find, although our deli does stock it. Does anyone know of a substitute for this type of flour or anywhere where it can be bought online?

Many thanks
Rosemary
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Postby saucisson » Sat Aug 22, 2009 5:15 pm

http://www.letsgoitalian.co.uk/index.ph ... roduct=181

Reading between the lines, any 00 flour should have the same properties...
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Postby Ianinfrance » Sat Aug 22, 2009 8:48 pm

saucisson wrote:http://www.letsgoitalian.co.uk/index.php?view=product&product=181

Reading between the lines, any 00 flour should have the same properties...


Sorry, Dave, but that's a common error. Despite what Waitrose says on their website Italian tipo 00 refers only to the fineness of the grind, and has nothing to do with the type of grain used. Tipo 00 may be strong flour, but it can also be the equivalent of the ordinary cake flour.

I can find you several Italian references if you find this hard to believe.
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Postby JuliaBalbilla » Sun Aug 23, 2009 4:38 am

Thank you both for your replies. I agree with you Ian, re 00 flour. I get two sorts, one which is made from hard durum wheat which is suitable for bread and pasta and the other, which is much softer and is used for pizza dough and pastry making. I used to get terribly confused over this as well! The durum wheat flour also seems to contain gluten, which of course will help the bread to rise.

However, Dave, thanks for the link - it does look as if that particular flour may well work. My friends did say they had used hard durum wheat flour, but their bread didn't rise and they had tried it twice.It should rise beautifully when made half in half to the Very Strong Canadian wheat flour from Waitrose.

Best wishes
Rosemary
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Postby saucisson » Sun Aug 23, 2009 4:04 pm

Ianinfrance wrote:
saucisson wrote:http://www.letsgoitalian.co.uk/index.php?view=product&product=181

Reading between the lines, any 00 flour should have the same properties...


Sorry, Dave, but that's a common error. Despite what Waitrose says on their website Italian tipo 00 refers only to the fineness of the grind, and has nothing to do with the type of grain used. Tipo 00 may be strong flour, but it can also be the equivalent of the ordinary cake flour.

I can find you several Italian references if you find this hard to believe.


Not at all, thanks for putting me straight :)

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