Stand Mixers

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Stand Mixers

Postby Dr. Chuckles » Wed Oct 28, 2009 7:57 pm

What type of mixer should I get, guys?

I was STRONGLY considering buying the Electrolux Magic Mill seeing as it can knead dough for several loaves at a time, but I have heard that generally outside of its use as a bread-maker, it is virtually useless (i.e. it has a hard time creaming hard cold butter). Not to mention there is a learning curve associated with it because it doesnt come with a manual nor any instructions of telling the user of how to use it.

My ideal mixer is something that does an all-around good job at handling the thickest of cookie doughs as well as being able to whip and cream.
The bread-kneading part isnt AS much as a problem seeing that it is very possible that one can knead dough by hand.

Please, any recs on a good solid mixer would be appreciated.
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Postby wheels » Wed Oct 28, 2009 8:42 pm

Dr. Chuckles

I won't attempt to answer your question as I'm guessing you are in the US and I'm over the other side of the pond in GB.

However, I'm sure some of our US members will advise you in due course. Welcome to the forum. :D

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Postby mitchamus » Wed Oct 28, 2009 9:59 pm

Choice magazine did a review of 12 stand mixers in July.

Unfortunately, the article is in the archive now, and you have to pay to read it...

http://www.choice.com.au/Reviews-and-Te ... mpare.aspx

the brands tested are:

* Breville BEM400
* Breville BEM200C
* Eurolab Multi-Function Stand Mixer YD-388
* Kenwood KMX51 - kMix Stand Mixer
* Kenwood KM270 Patissier Mixer
* Kenwood Chef Kitchen Machine KM315A950
* Kenwood Chef Kitchen Machine KM300 #
* KitchenAid 5KSM150PS
* Sunbeam MX8900
* Sunbeam MX7700
* Sunbeam MX001
* Sunbeam MX5950
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Postby Ruralidle » Mon Nov 16, 2009 4:52 pm

Hi Dr Chuckles

I'm not sure if this machine is available where you are (it is the Kenwood Major 020)

http://www.kenwoodworld.com/en/Products ... jor/KM020/

If you make a soft dough - as I do - it will easily cope with 1.5kg of white flour and a little over 1kg of water. It also mixes cakes well, creams butter and whisks cream whilst mine also came with a food processor and liquidiser. You can also get loads lf other attachments including a mincer/sausage stuffer.

We also have an old Kenwood Chef which is still going strong so I would highly recommend them.

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Postby culinairezaken » Tue Nov 17, 2009 9:04 am

i have a kenwood major too, it can mix, knead and whip about everything.

i'm verry happy with it.
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Postby Gordon » Tue Nov 17, 2009 12:17 pm

I use a Kitchenaid Artisan mixer, it works perfectly and I believe it's much cheaper in the US than it is here
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Postby scotty » Wed Dec 16, 2009 11:03 pm

i have the electrolux because of its bread making capacity but i also need/have a stand mixer
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Postby Richierich » Thu Dec 17, 2009 7:55 am

I have a Kenwood Major, has no problem creaming butter, only tried 500g at a time though. Took over 3kg of sausage mix the other week, minces fantastic.

I pick up one of the earlier models from eBay, apparently they are built better than the new ones, although my model is now obsolete there a still one or two places to get spares.

From what I understand it tends to be dough that is the killer for most of these machines.
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Postby Ianinfrance » Fri Dec 18, 2009 11:49 pm

Not really here!

Just popped in to say that we used to knead a good kilo of bread dough in our Kenwood Major, but it struggled to try to do more. We regularly mince 10 lbs of meat for pate and sausages in it, emulsify the sasagemeat, grind coffee, slice 2kg or so of potatoes for pommes de terre boulangere (in about 1 minutes) blend up lots of 12 litres of soups to velvet texture - cream of tomato, pumpkin, palestine, vosbabour (armenian red lentil soup), curried parsnip, crecy etc.

In 40 years we're on our second, but that's only because the 1st one decided to do a nosedive onto a tiled floor about 3 years ago, while working unattended, and was never quite the same after that before finally expiring in a cloud of blue smoke.

As it happens, we no longer use it for long kneading, but use the more modern "hydration" method.
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Re what mixer

Postby Abrwstr » Sat Jan 09, 2010 9:52 am

I would go for a Kenwood every time, they are certainly worth the extra cash.
I have a large Kenwood mixer that will do just about everything,...... whip cream butter eggs etc for sponges and cakes..... mix large quantities of dough for bread and scones buns and pizzas...... it will mince meat and stuff sausages, it's approx 40 years old and cost me £12 from a boot sale approx 10 years ago and came with all the attachments. (and I can still get spares for it) so I cannot praise Kenwood products enough.
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Postby RodinBangkok » Sat Jan 09, 2010 11:44 am

Not to be contrary, but if your into baking and or using large quantities in a mixer, I'd go for a small commercial over any of the household brands out there today. Now I know a lot of these are not imported or supported in either Europe or North America, but some the Chinese commercial products are very reliable, and well supported here. The prices are so much lower than the household high end offered in the West. If you can find a supplier that can provide service its well worth the look. Most of the household stuff uses plastic gearing and is just not suited for long term use for even a home baker if your using it on a regular basis. As a second choice, check out some used Resto equipment houses, they may have some good used equipment at affordable prices.
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Re: Re what mixer

Postby Jaunty » Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:50 pm

Abrwstr wrote:I would go for a Kenwood every time, they are certainly worth the extra cash.
I have a large Kenwood mixer that will do just about everything,...... whip cream butter eggs etc for sponges and cakes..... mix large quantities of dough for bread and scones buns and pizzas...... it will mince meat and stuff sausages, it's approx 40 years old and cost me £12 from a boot sale approx 10 years ago and came with all the attachments. (and I can still get spares for it) so I cannot praise Kenwood products enough.


Ditto. I was given my Nan's Kenwood Chef A701 when she passed away. It is still going strong and is getting on for 50 years old. Full parts remain available.

Because iBood had very goods offers on them, I recently got the Kenwood kMix stand mixer & liquidiser which are Kenwood's response to KitchenAid styling but seem to maintain the Kenwood quality.
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Re: What mixer

Postby steelchef » Fri Sep 17, 2010 5:29 am

We have a Kitchenaid with all of the attachments. We use it for grinding, stuffing, beating, mixing and the dough hook does a terrific job.
After 2 years, no regrets. And it's probably the cheapest of the lot, at least on this side. I think the key with any of these appliances is to not overheat them. If they feel unusually hot, give them a cooling off period.
Cheers!
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Postby fatchef » Tue Sep 28, 2010 11:47 am

Kenwood Gets my vote as it is so easy to get attachements for and they can do a bit of everything well.. I love mine and would now be lost with out it!!
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Postby Snags » Tue Sep 28, 2010 12:23 pm

I am upto mixer number 3 in less than 2 years
First one was an Aldi home Brand lasted over a year ended up killing the gears that drove the dough hooks
Second one was a Kenwood Propero total rubbish lasted less than a month,platic broke that held the head down and it bounced up and down and would turn off<I bought it back and upgraded to a Kenwood KM270 Patissier Mixer its a bit smaller in the motor 400 watt compared to 600 but its alot heavier being a metal body and base.
So far one dough and its not bad.
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