drying and salt

Air dried cured Meat Techniques

drying and salt

Postby Jokat » Fri May 13, 2016 12:05 pm

So, I made some filleta and it is delicious but a little too salty. I understand that if I add 3% salt by weight (I actually add 2.75% salt and .25% pink salt) AND dry the meat to 70% of it's original weight, I will have successfully cured this meat. My question is, If I dry it further can I reduce the salt percentage?
If so, is there a calculator available that works for this?
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Re: drying and salt

Postby NCPaul » Fri May 13, 2016 12:44 pm

With whole muscle cuts I would hesitate to drop down to 2.3 % total salt and I think you will like the texture better at 35-40 % weight loss.
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Re: drying and salt

Postby BriCan » Sat May 14, 2016 4:48 am

NCPaul wrote:With whole muscle cuts I would hesitate to drop down to 2.3 % total salt and I think you will like the texture better at 35-40 % weight loss.


I do 2% salt and 0.25% cure #2 for a total of 2.25% salt

I know that one dose not need to use cure on whole muscle curing .. but foe me I like the taste it brings too the process

Myself I prefer the 40% wight loss --- but also had some Balles de Jambon that I made perfect at 38% so it seems to be up to what one is curing :)
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Re: drying and salt

Postby BriCan » Sat May 14, 2016 5:15 am

Jokat wrote:So, I made some filleta and it is delicious but a little too salty. I understand that if I add 3% salt by weight (I actually add 2.75% salt and .25% pink salt) AND dry the meat to 70% of it's original weight, I will have successfully cured this meat.


Curing and drying/maturing are two totally different things :)

Doing a EQ cure (weight of the meat x the salt at 2.25%, plus the weight of the meat x the cure #2 at 0.25%) placed in a container/ziplock bag will be cured (depending upon the size/diameter of said meat) in seven to 21 days -- drying/maturing is where the weight loss comes into effect

30% weight loss is not IMMHO dry enough -- I normally go by the squeeze test -- if it feels firm and resistant to the squeeze then in most cases it will be ready --- aim for no less than 35% as NCPaul has suggested

My question is, If I dry it further can I reduce the salt percentage?
If so, is there a calculator available that works for this?


No; --- drying it further will not reduce the salt content it will increase it -- you need to reduce the salt at the start -- and no there is no calculator for this (reduction of the salt percentage) -- you need to find out your own preference by keeping diligent records of all things you do

I have items (solid muscles) that I cure with 1.8% salt and 0.25% cure #2 which gives me a salt total of 2.05% -- not something I would recommend for people just starting out -- I have a few years under my belt and I also do this for a living :)
But what do I know
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Re: drying and salt

Postby Jokat » Sat May 14, 2016 12:57 pm

Thanks for the good tips!
What I meant is: if I dry it further than 30%, can I use less salt to cure it. Sound's like I can but isn't the saltiness of the meat more dependent on length of time in the zip lock with the cure than anything else?
What recommendations do you have for salting about a 2-3 #pork tenderloin?
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Re: drying and salt

Postby BriCan » Sat May 14, 2016 10:51 pm

Jokat wrote:Thanks for the good tips!
What I meant is: if I dry it further than 30%, can I use less salt to cure it.


You are missing the point :)

Sound's like I can but isn't the saltiness of the meat more dependent on length of time in the zip lock with the cure than anything else?


No; --- the saltiness is dependent on the amount of salt you use -- not necessary the length of time in the zip lock with the cure than anything else


What recommendations do you have for salting about a 2-3 #pork tenderloin?


So; assuming you have a piece of pork tenderloin that is trimmed and free from all siverskin that weighs 2 lbs, --- first of all we need to change to grams as this is a more accurate way of weighing things :)

2 lbs. x 2,2046 = 0.907g

What we are going to do is what is called a "EQ cure" (equilibrium curing -- you can read all about it here http://thesaltcuredpig.com/Porkopedia/i ... ium_Curing )

So; 907g (weight of the meat) x 2.25% (salt we need) = 20g

For the cure the following is needed
907g (weight of the meat) x 0.25% cure #2 = 2g

You have now got a total of 22g of salt for your 2 lb piece of pork tenderloin

Remember on whole muscle curing you do not need to use the cure but you will need to increase the salt to 2.5% (23g salt)

A 2 lb piece of pork tenderloin will only take 7 days to cure before proceeding to drying -- leaving it in the cure for 6 months will not make this any more salty as it would after 7 days

This is the beauty of EQ curing

HTH
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