My sausage saturday

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My sausage saturday

Postby aris » Sat Oct 09, 2004 6:33 pm

After finishing all the chores at home, I decided to make some sausages. I went to my local friendly butcher and he boned and minced two hands of pork. I asked him to take the rind off first, but he said the meat was very fresh, and the rind was soft, so it was not necessary.

Well, he was right! I made 10 kilos of Boerewors and it was fantastic. Soft and, light and just the right amount of fat.

I also got a side of belly to make bacon. This had some fat on the inside which i had not seen before. It was a very soft fat which almost peeled off - looked alot like caul. I'm not sure of the name of this fat, but I chopped it up and put it in with my sausage mix.

My friendly butcher also gave me a dozen strands of collagen hog casings FOR FREE. He said he had no use for them as he only uses natural casings (I got a hank of those too).

The hank I got from him was of the salted variety. The ones I got from Franco before were in a brine solution - while these were almost dry - and covered in rock salt. You had to soak them for 5-10 minutes for before use to re-hydrate them.

With the two hands of pork I also got a couple of trotters - anyone got a recipe for trotters? I believe there it is a bit of an art in cleaning and preparing them. Any pointers would be appreciated, otherwise they're going in the bin.
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Postby Oddley » Sat Oct 09, 2004 7:20 pm

As far as the trotters go the Irish just boil them in stock. While the chinese boil them in good stock then leave them to get cold then deep fry them. I've tried this method with a hock of bacon and it is good.

But I leave it up to you... :)

The Boerewors sound great as soon as my sausage stuffer is delivered from Franco I'll give them a go.

Franco where's my sausage stuffer... :P
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Trotters

Postby Franco » Sun Oct 10, 2004 8:20 am

Aris,

I always simmer trotters for around 6 hours on a very low heat, after this I prepare them in various ways.

Cold trotters.Chill and then pour over a dressing of crushed garlic, parsley, olive oil and vinegar and eat cold.


Stuffed trotters
1.After they have been simmered for 6 hours let them cool and take out the bones.
2.Stuff them with your choice of filling and tie the trotters up in string to retain their original shape.
3.Bake them covered in foil on a low heat for 20 minutes and then finish them off without the foil for another 10 minutes on a higher heat.

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Postby aris » Sun Oct 10, 2004 8:31 am

How do you clean them? Just scrub them well? Do you take the nails out before or after cooking?

I once had a nice trotter dish in Zambia. I'm not sure how it was made, but the whole trotter was cooked in a tomato type of sauce. The trotter was cooked so long that the cartilidge was soft and edible. It was very sticky, but also, very yummy.
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nails

Postby Franco » Sun Oct 10, 2004 10:03 am

Aris,
I leave everything on, the trotters are usually cleaned at the abbatoir but if there is any hair left on I burn it off over the gas ring. I then scrub them with a brush and leave them to soak for a while then rinse well.

Another way to cook them is to shallow fry them after they have been simmered.
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trotters

Postby mevisblair » Wed Oct 13, 2004 11:10 am

its nice to read about some thing you have done before.well i used to own a club in zambia and i used to cook the trotters in zambia they call them chimbombos,people used to come just for chimbombos when i cook chimbombos i used to cook dry beans also.my customers used to like eating them with beans or rice some used to like the soup.you can also try cow,s trotters they are nice also.step one tell the butcher to cut for you ,wash them and put them in a pot,add black pepper,tumeric, tomato, onion,or tomato puree a bit of cooking oil and salt,let them boil for a long time keep on checking them make sure they dont be come over cooked other wise you wont enjoy them they be come too sleeperly.when they be come tender add green beans and simmer for 10,20 minutes or untill the beans is cooked.try this receipe you will love it ,and you will love the soup

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Postby aris » Wed Oct 13, 2004 11:33 am

Mevis,

Do you cook the trotters whole?

Approximatly how long do you cook them for?
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Postby Robd » Wed Oct 13, 2004 12:28 pm

Hi I'm new here so bare with me, I don't know alot about trotters but the soft fat on the inside of the belly is call leaf fat where I come from,

Cheers,

Rob.
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Postby aris » Wed Oct 13, 2004 1:00 pm

Rob,

Thanks for that information. That 'leaf fat' as you call it is delicious in sausage! As you say, it is very soft - and tasty.

Where are you from - and is this leaf fat used for anything in particular there?
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Postby Robd » Wed Oct 13, 2004 1:23 pm

Hi I'm from Worcestershire and used to own a pork butchers making pies sausage and cooked meats etc then got divorced etc etc now in IT, But looking to make a come back in the food trade ie looking at opening a Deli shortly with all home cooked meats sausage and pies etc, not going back into full butchery again just for fun this time alongside the IT business,

Cheers,

Rob :D
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Postby Robd » Wed Oct 13, 2004 1:24 pm

sorry answer to your question we used to render it down for dripping / lard mainly for the pork pie pastry.

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Postby aris » Wed Oct 13, 2004 1:27 pm

Nice one - from butchery to IT. I've been in IT for some time now, and would probably consider going the other way around!
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Postby Robd » Wed Oct 13, 2004 1:35 pm

been in IT since 96 had enough now starting to fancy a change or a step back, was in meat job for 12 years and miss the laugh not quite the same in this job eh!!

Rob
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Pork Pies

Postby Franco » Wed Oct 13, 2004 1:49 pm

Rob,


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Postby Robd » Wed Oct 13, 2004 2:04 pm

Hi Franco

It was a long time ago but this is something I am working on but we did use a base mix from RHM and then add our own bits and pieces, on a separate note whats the score with MSG and is it available these day's hasen't to add not for sausage but I have seen some USA recipies that use it!!

Rob :roll:
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