ISO: Parson Snows

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Curing Salt Info.

Postby Parson Snows » Thu Nov 18, 2004 7:47 am

If you read the excerpts below I think that you can then understand I reason that I asked Franco for his definitive figures.

General Curing Notes/Information

Taken from Making Sausages at Home (Len Poli) web site
�CURING SALTS: Curing means to make the meat product inhospitable to spoilage microorganisms and to flavor, color, and tenderize the meat. Meat can be cured either by the addition of salt alone or salt in combination with one or more ingredients such as sodium nitrite, sugar, and spices. The preparation and use of curing mixtures must be carefully planned and executed. Curing is generally done under refrigeration (36�F / 2�C) and is essential when the formulation requires meat to be processed at low temperatures (under 140�F / 60�C)�.while smoking, for example. Cures come pre-mixed and ready to use; they are usually added to the meat as an ingredient along with the other seasonings.
"Curing salt" is available in two formulations: Cure #1 (also called Prague Powder #1) which contains pure salt and sodium nitrite; and Cure #2 (also called Prague Powder #2) which contains pure salt, sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. Careful attention must be paid to the sausage formulation to be sure that the correct cure is used!
Prague Powder #1: sometimes called "pink salt", Insta-Cure, Cure #1 or Modern Cure. This cure contains 6.25% sodium nitrite mixed with salt. Use 1 level teaspoon of cure for 5 lb. of meat. (2.5 grams of cure per kilogram of meat) Mix cure with cold water. This cure is not interchangeable with Cure #2.
Prague Powder #2: sometimes called Cure #2 or Insta-Cure #2 has 6.25% of sodium nitrite with 4% of sodium nitrate mixed with salt and must be used with any products that do not require cooking, smoking, or refrigeration. The sodium nitrate in this cure slowly breaks down into sodium nitrite, then into nitric oxide over a long period of time. Use 1 level teaspoon of cure for 5 lbs. of meat. (2.5 grams of cure per kilogram of meat) Mix cure with cold water. This cure is not interchangeable with Cure #1.
http://home.pacbell.net/lpoli/page0001.htm

Taken from Chemical Hazard Analysis For Sodium Nitrite In Meat Curing

�Nitrite may be obtained and used in two forms�as the pure chemical sodium nitrite, or as a so-called curing salt or pre-blend in which the sodium nitrite is distributed in and diluted by ordinary salt (sodium chloride). In this latter instance the blend is made so that the use of salt at the normal level in a given product (2.5% for example) results in the correct level of nitrite. The use of curing salts avoids the direct use of nitrite and the attendant concerns about correct weighing, distribution and validation. If, for example, a mistake is made and too much curing salt is added the consumer is alerted because the product will be too salty.
It must be kept in mind that preblended curing mixes may have different concentrations of nitrite. In other words, they could be manufactured for different applications or for specific formulations, so as to make them optimally useful for a variety of products and applications.�

http://www.ag.ohio-state.edu/~meatsci/borca2.htm

Taken from Hormel web site
�Curing Salt

Salt used in curing and preserving food, consisting of a mixture of approximately 94 percent salt and approximately 6 percent sodium nitrite. It is generally dyed a pink color so that it can be easily recognized from regular salts.�

http://www.hormel.com/kitchen/glossary.asp?id=34996&catitemid=

Taken from Con Yeager web site
�Q What is the difference between the Maple and Brown Curing Salt that Con Yeager Spice Company sells, where some say that they contain 1.5% sodium nitrite, and other cures contain 0.75% sodium nitrite?
A Generally, the 1.5% sodium nitrite cures are for soaking meats. The ham, bacon, or brisket would then pick up 8 to 10 percent of it�s own weight in cure. The 0.75% sodium nitrite cures are for pumping and soaking, where one would inject more than 10 percent (maybe 15 to 20 percent) of the weight of the meat before soaking. In those cases, a less concentrated cure must be used to reach the target nitrite. The target nitrite level in hams or bacons (for the home processor) is 150 to 200 parts-per-million (ppm). For commercial folks, some state regulations may vary (Ohio is 120 ppm for bacons). Use this rule-of-thumb formula for computing final nitrite:

Pounds per gallon used X percent pump X percent nitrite X 10 = final ppm nitrite

Example: You are using a curing salt that is 0.75% sodium nitrite, and it calls for using 1 pound per gallon of water for a 20% pump. You have a 20 lb ham, and you pump 2 lb of curing bring into the ham (20% pump), then
1 X 20 x 0.75 x 10 = 150 ppm
http://www.yeagerspice.com/FAQ.htm

Taken from Elk Mountain Products web page�Curing Salt, Prague Powder #1, Speed Cure and Quick Cure are basically the same product, varying only slightly depending on the individual manufacturer.
Curing Salt is blended from salt, 6.22% to 6.25%, Sodium Nitrite Dextrose, FDC Red Dye #3 and an anti-caking agent, less than 2% of the total blend. Red dye is added (turns the mixture pink) so users don't mistake curing salt for regular table salt.
Curing Salt is regulated by the USDA at the rate of 4 oz. per each 100 lbs. of sausage and jerky meat, which figures out to be 1 level tsp. for each 5 lbs of meat.�s working on
http://www.dakotasausagestuffer.com/aboutnitrites.htm

Taken from Len Poli�s web site
�Curing Salts: Check the formulation carefully and be sure you use the correct cure; do not substitute! (Cure#1 and #2 are formulated in such a way so that 1 level US teaspoon will cure 5 pounds of meat.)

Cure #1 contains 6.75% Sodium nitrite; 93.25% Salt (for fresh and cooked sausages)
Cure #2 contains 6.75% Sodium nitrite; 4% Sodium nitrate and 89.25% Salt (for dry-cured sausages)�

http://home.pacbell.net/lpoli/Tips.htm

Taken from Great Sausage Recipes and Meat Curing 1984 Edition

�PRAGUE POWDER NO. 1
Prague Powder No. 1 is a basic cure that is used to cure all meats that require cooking, smoking, and canning � Prague Powder No. 1 is a combination of a small amount of sodium nitrite on a salt carrier. To be more specific, a pound of Prague Powder No. 1 contains 1 ounce of sodium nitrite to each 1 pound of salt. � When curing 10 pounds of meat, it takes a little less than � ounce of Prague Powder No. 1. Put another way, 4 level teaspoons equal about 1 ounce of Prague Powder, or 2 level teaspoons will cure 10 lbs. of sausage.�

�PRAGUE POWDER NO. 2
Prague Powder No. 2 is a cure specifically formulated to be used dry-cured products. These are products that do not require cooking, smoking or refrigeration. Prague Powder No. 2 is also on a salt carrier and contains one ounce of sodium nitrate along with .64 ounces of sodium nitrate to each one pound of salt.�

Taken from The Sausagemaker�s Winter 2004 catalogue

�A Few Words About Cures The primary and most important reason that meat is cured is to prevent food poisoning. Any kind of meat or sausage that will be cooked and smoked at low temperature MUST be cured. To trigger food poisoning, the requirements are lack of oxygen, moisture, and temperatures in range of 40-140�F. When smoking meats, the heat and smoke eliminate the oxygen. The meats have moisture and are traditionally smoked and cooked in the low ranges of 90 to 160�F. As you can see, these are ideal conditions for food poisoning if you don�t use cures. To explain it in simpler terms, I am sure that many of us at one time or another have read a newspaper article about entire families being poisoned around Thanksgiving or Christmas holidays eating a freshly killed turkey. How is this possible? To save time, the well intentioned cook probably decides to make the dressing and stuff the turkey the night before. The turkey is placed in the fridge and cooked the next day. Now let us analyze what was done. First the dressing is cooled so it can easily be handled, stuffed into the turkey, the cavity sewed up and placed in the fridge overnight. Inadvertently, the three conditions for food poisoning have been created: a moist dressing, cooled down to probably 90 or 100�F, for easy handling; removal of the oxygen by sewing up the cavity. It is that easy to start food poisoning. Even cooking the turkey at 350 to 400�F will not destroy the toxins. Some, like Botulism can grow and produce its toxin without a foul odor or other sign of contamination to warn you.

Insta Cure #1
For Smoked and Cooked Sausages Think of it- just one cure for all these sausages and meats: no need for a different cure each time you want a different piece of meat, fish or poultry. Instacure #1 is a basic cure that is used to cure all meats that require cooking, smoking, and canning. This would include poultry, fish, hams, bacon, luncheon meats, corned beef, pates, and many other products too numerous to mention.

Insta Cure #2
For Dry Cured Meats And Sausage Instacure No. 2 is a cure specifically formulated to be used with dry- cured products. These are products that do not require cooking, smoking, or refrigeration. To dry cure sausage or meat properly, it simply cannot be done with a cure containing sodium nitrate only (Instacure No. 1). It dissipates too quickly, as some products require curing for up to 6 months. Instacure #2 is formulated for dry curing meat and sausage such as: Pepperoni, hard salami, dried farmers sausage, genoa salami, proscutti hams, capicola, plantation hams�

www.sausagemaker.com

The following taken from Allied Kenco web site
�PRAGUE POWDER #1: Also called Insta-Cure and Modern Cure.
This cure is sodium nitrite (6.25 %) mixed with salt (93.75 %) As the meat temperate rises during processing, the sodium nitrite changes to nitric oxide and starts to 'gas out' at about 130 �F. After the smoking /cooking process is complete only about 10-20 % of the original nitrite remains. As the product is stored and later reheated for consumption, the decline of nitrite continues. Use 1 oz. for 25 lb. of meat or 1 level teaspoon of cure for 5lb. of meat. Mix cure with cold water.
PRAGUE POWDER #2:
Used with dry-cured products. Has 1 oz. of sodium nitrite with .64 oz. of sodium nitrate to each lb. of salt. Use with products that do not require cooking, smoking, or refrigeration. This cure, which is sodium nitrate, acts like a time release, slowing breaking down into sodium nitrite, then into nitric oxide. This allows you to dry cure products that take much longer to cure. (A cure with sodium nitrite would dissipate too quickly.)
Use 1 oz. of cure for 25 lbs. of meat or 1 level teaspoon of cure for 5 lbs. of meat. Mix cure with cold water.�
http://www.alliedkenco.com/data/data_sheets/data_additive.html

The following taken from �Ingredients in Meat Products� Montana Meat Processors 2001
Nitrite / Nitrate
Historically these compounds came into use as naturally occurring contaminants of salt. People found that cured meat containing them was superior to that without and finally, when early chemists identified the compounds, the were added deliberately. Nitrates and nitrites must be used with caution during curing. Both are poisonous and therefore, strict limits on their use have been established. Excessive use of nitrates and nitrites not only presents a health hazard but may also result in nitrite burn that is a green or white discoloration in the cured meat. In addition to the color role these products perform other very critical functions in cured meats. Nitrates and nitrites have a pronounced effect on flavor. Without them a cured ham would simply be a salty pork roast. They further affect flavor by acting as a powerful antioxidant. Antioxidants are compounds that prevent the development of oxidative rancidity. The bacteriostatic properties of nitrites are also important in cured meats, particularly in canned hams. Sodium nitrite is a very effective inhibitor of the growth of Clostridia, particularly Clostridium botulinum, the bacteria that causes botulism (Jay, 1986). Without nitrite you could not safely produce pasteurized canned hams. Nitrate in itself is not effective in producing the curing reaction. It must first be broken down to nitrite by microorganisms to cause color change. With the need for rapid curing to meet today�s modern processing schedules, nitrite is added directly into ham brines except when long processing schemes are used for example in "country cured" hams or Westphalian hams, than nitrates may be used. US regulations only allow the use of nitrates in specialty products requiring long cure time such as country cured hams or dry cured bacon. Nitrites provide the ultimate source of the nitric oxide that combines with the myoglobin pigment. The level is highly regulated in many countries. United States regulations allow only 200 ppm in hams and 120 ppm in bacon. Since only small amounts of nitrites are needed, they must be handled carefully. To insure distribution they should be carefully dissolved in the brine and the brine properly mixed. Premixed cures offer a simple solution to the control problem. Many suppliers have a mixture of salt and nitrite that is often sold to customers. Prague powder or Cure #1 has a set level of nitrite (6.4%) while the majority is salt. Ask the supplier what level of nitrite is in you specific blend. Don�t forget to adjust your overall salt level when using these products.

Taken from the Food Compliance web site

�PRAGUE POWDER
A powdered cure containing 6.25% nitrite (usually 6.25% sodium nitrite and 93.75% sodium chloride).�

http://www.foodcompliance.com

Saltpetre
Sodium Nitrate is often used in curing and helps create the pink color in cured meats. It also extends shelf life and reduces the chance of contamination. Danger! Strong oxidizer. Contact with other material may cause fire. Harmful if swallowed or inhaled. May cause irritation to skin, eyes, and respiratory tract.

Always use Protective Equipment when using this product: Goggles and lab coat
Prague Powder #1, Pink Curing Salt
Also referred to as Tinted Cure. Pink curing salt is popular for all types of sausage curing. Try adding maple flavor or sugar to develop your own special cure.

Ingredients:
Salt, Sodium Nitrite (6.25 %), Red #3, less than 2% Sodium Silico Aluminate & Propylene Glycol added as flowing agent.

Usage:
Use 1 oz. of cure for 25 lbs. of meat or 1 level teaspoon of cure for 5 lbs. of meat. Mix cure with cold water.

Taken from Tallyrand web site
�What is curing?
It is the process of preserving the foods by a form of dehydration by the addition of a chemical. It is also used to add other flavours to the foods
What are the commonly used curing compounds?
Salt, sugar and sodium nitrate. Salt and sugar both cure meat by osmosis, in addition to drawing the water from the food, they dehydrate and kill the bacteria that make food spoil. Commercially though, the word "cure" refers to processing the meat with either sodium nitrite or sodium nitrate. Sodium nitrite is the basis for two commercially used products: Prague powders #1 and #2.
Prague powder #1
A mixture of 1 part sodium nitrite and 16 parts salt The chemicals are combined and crystallised to assure even distribution. Even though diluted, only 100gm of Prague powder #1 is required to cure 45kg of meat. A more typical measurement for home use is 1 tsp per 2kg of meat.
My note: At 1 part sodium nitrate and 16 parts salt the % sodium nitrite could not be more concentrated than 5.88 % (1/17 x 100)
Prague powder #2
A mixture of 1 part sodium nitrite, 64 parts sodium nitrate and 16 parts salt. It is primarily used in dry-curing.�
My note: Even people such as Tallyrand make mistakes. This should read 0.64 parts and not 64 parts. However, at 1 part sodium nitrate, 0.64 parts sodium nitrate and 16 parts salt the % sodium nitrite could not be more concentrated than 5.6689 % (1/17.64 x 100)
http://www.hub-uk.com/tallytip01/tip0034.htm

Taken from The Spice House web site
�Curing Salt
Also known as Prague Powder No. 1, this is a standard 6.25% cure for any meat that requires cooking, smoking or canning. The reason for using a cure for these forms of cooking meat is to prevent botulism and enhance preservation. Prague Powder is the basic cure you want for sausage, corned beef, ham, bacon, fish, poultry, etc.
Ingredients: salt, sodium nitrite, glycerin with FD #3 used to color cure in accordance with MDI Bulletin 656 of 4/1/74. Not edible on its own.

Recipes
Only 1 oz. of Prague Powder is necessary to cure 25 pounds of sausage; 4 oz. will cure 100 pounds.�

www.thespicehouse.com

Taken from Jack Schmidling Productions, Inc

�CURES
The subject that seems to cause the most confusion to beginners is that of cures. They come in various forms and with various names but the bottom line is that one type contains sodium nitrite and the other contains sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. The generic name for the former is Prague Powder #1 and the latter is #2. These go under various trade names but are always recognized by the Prague nomenclature.
Prague #1 is used for cured sausages that fall into the semi-dry catagory in addition to other cooked products such as "boiled" ham. Prague #2 is used for dried sausages and country cured hams and bacon. Both of these powders are combined with enough salt so that they can be measured out by the teaspoon for recipes. They are also colored pink to distinguish them from common salt
In addition to the bacteriacidal effects of cures, the most obvious effect of cures is the pink color of the finished product. Gray or brown ham, bacon and sausage simply does not appeal to the modern consumer.
Morton Salt has several products that combine the cures with large amounts of salt and sugar that provide all the salt and sugar needed for a recipe but it precludes the sausage maker from experimenting with the amounts of the ingredients in a recipe. I much prefer to use the Prague powders and adjust the salt and sugar to my taste.
These cures are inexpensive and readily available from the many sources of sausage making supplies found on the web.�


As you can see all up in the air. Therefore as I'm doing recipes for THIS SITE I wanted to know what the % of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Nitrite in Franco's "Curing Salts" were.

Kind Regards

Parson Snows
Heavenly Father Bless us
And keep us all alive
There's ten around the table
And food enough for five... Amen
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Postby Oddley » Thu Nov 18, 2004 12:36 pm

aris I hope you did not take umbridge at my post no insult was intended. But as this is an important subject I think it's important to find the truth of the matter.

In your post you copied from len Polis site.

aris wrote:Cure #1 contains 6.75% Sodium nitrite; 93.25% Salt

I copied from len Polis site
I wrote:Cure #1 or Modern Cure. This cure contains 6.25% sodium nitrite mixed with salt

As you can see there is an inconsistancy and this from just 1 site. I think that is why we needed the correct amounts from Franco.
********************************************
Thanks Parson Snows i've finally got a formula for nitrites in brines. Here.
Parson Snows wrote:Pounds per gallon used X percent pump X percent nitrite X 10 = final ppm nitrite

Would somebody please check my calculations to see if they are correct.
Oddleys Calculation wrote:I have used 10% pump level because the site said the meat would natrually soak up between 8-10% of the brine

I have a 4lb Brisket soaking in 4 pint water which containes 32 grames Prague powder # 1

32 gm / 28.3495 gm = 1.12 oz

To get lbs per gallon 2 * 4 pints = 1 gallon .: 2 * 1.12 = 2.24 oz of cure per gallon of water

2.24oz / 16 oz = 0.14 lbs per gallon

Pounds per gallon used X percent pump X percent nitrite X 10 = final ppm nitrite

0.14 * 10 * 6.25 * 10 = 87.5 ppm nitrite

Thanks.
Last edited by Oddley on Thu Nov 18, 2004 1:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby aris » Thu Nov 18, 2004 12:50 pm

No offence taken. Perhaps you should point this out to Len.
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Formulas on this Site

Postby Parson Snows » Thu Nov 18, 2004 2:21 pm

Oddley; it is exactly for this purpose that I asked how I could post formulae/formulas on this web site. Using your input this will be sorted out. I have already visited/and used imageshack (the Rampant Lion for example), and I will be working on a complete set of formulae covering this subject.

As to your formula I don't see any salt (apart from the carrier in the Prague Powder) or sugar added

Kind Regards


Parson Snows
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Postby Oddley » Thu Nov 18, 2004 2:47 pm

Thanks for the quick reply parson. But what I was asking was for somebody to check out my figures for ppm nitrites in the brisket.

The fomula:

Pounds per gallon used X percent pump X percent nitrite X 10 = final ppm nitrite

Doesn't need the salt content or sugar content to arrive at an answer.

In your opinion is this an accurate formula for finding out ppm nitrites.
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Formulae on this site

Postby Parson Snows » Thu Nov 18, 2004 2:57 pm

Oddley Try out the following for the mean time.

The other ingredient weights include sugar, salt etc. IN GRAMS
Weight of water (per gal) @ 60 degrees F
1 Gallon (US) = 8.337 045 264 109 35 lbs
1 Gallon (UK) = 10.022 266 313 9 lbs

Image

MULTIPLY the above Wt of Brine by 1 000 and then insert below as weight of pickle in grams

Image

Hope that this tides you over for now

Kind Regards

Parson Snows

PS these images were done using ImageShack
Last edited by Parson Snows on Thu Nov 18, 2004 5:22 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Postby Oddley » Thu Nov 18, 2004 3:43 pm

Thanks very much. I shall certainly give it a go. Where did you get the formula from (you don't have to answer that).

Cheers!
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Curing Formulas/Formulae

Postby Parson Snows » Thu Nov 18, 2004 4:16 pm

I know that I been to"Lost Dazed and Confused" but I can't for the life of me remember where it was. The formulae that I have sent you are metric as that's what I'm used to working with. If you are used to Lbs, ozs. etc. then you'll just have to modify these for now. When I post the whole selection I will (or at least will try and) cover Imperial Units, US Units and Metric Units. As you can see the weight of sugar and salt does come into the equation.

Do you have any brine tables? As these really come in handy if you're trying to work out brines and Salometer (Brine Tester) readings. Brine Concentrations etc.

Kind Regards

Parson Snows
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And food enough for five... Amen
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Postby Oddley » Thu Nov 18, 2004 4:49 pm

Hi parson I've done the calc and messed up somewhere.

First of all is other ingredient weights in grams or imperial? and I'm assuming it doesn't include the weight of meat.

Anyway here's what I did


4lbs Brisket
4 pints water
32 grames Prague powder #1
80 gms salt
20 gms sugar

10.022 266 313 9 * .5 gal / 2.2046 = 2.273 + 132 gm = 134.273 / 1000 = 0.134

32 gm * 6.25% * 10 pump * 1000000 = 2000000000

100 *100 = 10000 * 0.134 = 1340

2000000000 / 1340 = 1492537.313 ppm


Something definitely wrong. LOL
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Nitrate ppm Calculations

Postby Parson Snows » Thu Nov 18, 2004 5:47 pm

Calculate as follows (Revised)

Oddley Wrote:
4lbs Brisket
4 pints water
32 grames Prague powder #1
80 gms salt
20 gms sugar

10.022 266 313 9 * .5 gal / 2.2046 = 2.273 + 132 gm = 134.273 / 1000 = 0.134

32 gm * 6.25% * 10 pump * 1000000 = 2000000000

100 *100 = 10000 * 0.134 = 1340

2000000000 / 1340 = 1492537.313 ppm


Revise to
4lbs Brisket 4 pints water (Imp)
10 % pump
32 grames Prague Powder #1
(1 oz Sodium Nitrite to 1 lb of Salt =1/17 *100 = 5.88 %)
80 gms salt
20 gms sugar

YES THE OTHER INGREDIENTS ARE IN GRAMS

10.022 266 313 9 * 0.5 / 2.204 6 = 2.273 035 kg + ((80+20+32)/1000) = 2.273 035 + 0.132 = 2.405 035 kg

MULTIPLY 2.405 035 * 1 000 = 2 405.035 and USE BELOW

ppm = ( 32 * 5.88 * 10 * 1 000 000 )/ (100 * 100 * 2 405.035)

ppm = 78.235 (78 ppm)



Hope this makes sense

Kind Regards

Parson Snows
Last edited by Parson Snows on Fri Nov 19, 2004 12:56 am, edited 2 times in total.
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My formula

Postby Franco » Thu Nov 18, 2004 6:02 pm

The formula I use for the Prague powders are taken from 'Great sausage recipes and meat curing' by Rytek Kutas.

Prague 1
1 pound salt, 1 ounce sodium nitrite

Prague 2
1 pound salt, 1 ounce sodium nitrite, 0.64 ounce sodium nitrate.

Franco
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Amount of Sodium Nitrite in Curing Salts

Postby Parson Snows » Thu Nov 18, 2004 7:03 pm

Franco wrote
The formula I use for the Prague powders are taken from 'Great sausage recipes and meat curing' by Rytek Kutas.

Prague 1
1 pound salt, 1 ounce sodium nitrite


So we're back to square one.

If you have 1 lb (16 ozs) of Salt and add 1 oz of Sodium Nitrite to it then yes you have added 6.25 % Sodium Nitrite to the 1 lb (16 ozs) of salt. However, you now have a total of 17 ozs and not 16 ozs therefore 1 oz of Sodium Nitrite now represents 5.882 4 % of the new total. As it has been mixed in thoroughy and is a "stable" mix then whatever size you distribute this at surely the percentage of Sodium Nitrite is constant at 5.882 4% and this is the figure that should be used in all calculations and NOT 6.25 %.

Hope that this is of some use

Kind Regards

Parson Snows
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Postby Oddley » Thu Nov 18, 2004 7:49 pm

Cheers Franco.

EDIT: EUREAKA

10.0222663139 * 0.5 / 2.204 6 = 2.273 kg + ((80+20+32)/ 1000)) = 0.132 + 2.273 = 2.305 kg

The original formula said Weight of Pickle in Grams so 2.305 kg = 2305 gms

ppm = ( 32 * 6.25 * 10 * 1000000 )/ (100 * 100 * 2305)

ppm = 86.767

With 5.8824 % Nitrite Francos Cure

ppm = ( 32 * 5.8824 * 10 * 1000000 )/ (100 * 100 * 2305)

ppm = 81.664
Last edited by Oddley on Thu Nov 18, 2004 10:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Eureka NEARLY

Postby Parson Snows » Fri Nov 19, 2004 1:07 am

Eureka NEARLY

Oddley check your math. It is 2.405 kg for the weight of the water and not 2.305 kg, a slip of the digit. The only reason that I even looked at it was that your ppm answer was HIGHER than before which it couldn't be as the % Sodium Nitrite figure had been lowered.

Franco still needs to confirm the 5.88 % but I think that all of my math is correct.

Kind Regards

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Postby Oddley » Fri Nov 19, 2004 9:06 am

Yep you are right the only excuse I have is I finished it late last night and was a bit tired. I think I'll have to write a small program to do it automatically.
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