Pork Pie Press

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Pork Pie Press

Postby Gingercat » Wed Sep 24, 2008 5:23 pm

I'm desperate to know if it's possible to get hold of a pork pie press. I'd love to be able to make really professional looking pies. I did see one advertised (think it was second hand) for something like 1600 pounds, but I don't want to spend so much as it's just a hobby.
Thanks in advance
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Postby saucisson » Wed Sep 24, 2008 5:28 pm

I've always hand raised mine and there are some tips on the site for doing this. Presses do seem to be thin on the ground though.

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Postby Gingercat » Wed Sep 24, 2008 5:34 pm

thanks Dave. I'll take a look.
I made a batch at the weekend and used a ramekin dish to form the pie casing which did work (much better than forming it by hand). Maybe a press might appear on Fleabay
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Postby wheels » Wed Sep 24, 2008 11:36 pm

Sorry to seem a bit thick, but what do you mean by a pork pie press?
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Postby Gingercat » Thu Sep 25, 2008 4:39 am

A press is used by butchers to create perfectly shaped pies.
What you do is put in a correct amount of pastry and pull down the lever to form the casing. Fill with meat mixture. Put on the lid press down again and hey presto you have a neat professional looking pork pie. (something like that anyway).
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Postby johnfb » Thu Sep 25, 2008 6:57 am

Have a look at this page by a member here:
These look fine to me. I know they are handmade but that doesn't take away from the way the pir looks.


http://www.btinternet.com/~happydudevir/piedolly.htm
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Postby wheels » Thu Sep 25, 2008 2:22 pm

Gingercat

As you have found those sort of presses cost a fortune. I you don't want a hand raised pie you could use tins such as:

http://www.nisbets.co.uk/products/productdetail.asp?productcode=E713 or

http://www.bizrate.co.uk/cooking_bakingequipment/oid505583529__nwylf--.html

Hope this helps.

Phil
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Postby saucisson » Thu Sep 25, 2008 3:12 pm

There is a photo of one here, already sold though :

http://www.buyitsellitwantit.co.uk/buy- ... vertid=516
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Postby Deer Man » Thu Sep 25, 2008 4:04 pm

Paul kribs made mine! 8)
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Postby Oddley » Thu Sep 25, 2008 4:30 pm

If you are serious about a pie machine, here are a couple of links.

http://www.brookfood.co.uk/used_equipme ... ategory=13

http://www.totalbakeryengineers.co.uk/stock_list.asp

I don't think you are ever going to get a pie press for peanuts.
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Postby Gingercat » Fri Sep 26, 2008 4:50 am

Thanks very much everyone. I've been surprised just how much these presses cost for what basically is a simple hand operated piece of equipment.

Looks like I'll have to continue to make them by hand
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Postby Spuddy » Sat Sep 27, 2008 9:20 am

Paul Kribbs made mine too.
You can't beat using a dolly for that hand raised look.
Once you get used to using them, it's quite quick and easy.
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Postby wheels » Sat Sep 27, 2008 1:57 pm

Spuddy

Are Paul's dollies varnished?

The one I had made isn't and it can be very difficult getting the pastry off. I don't want to ruin it with varnish though if it shouldn't be.

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Postby Spuddy » Sat Sep 27, 2008 2:12 pm

It has got some sort of lacquer on it yes (I'm not sure it's a varnish, more of a light shellac or similar) but I don't think it makes any difference.
The trick to getting the pastry off is to first make sure the dolly is well floured and then gently prise the dough away from the sides so that you gan get a finger or two down to the base then gently twist the dolly whilst holding down the base with said fingers and it should come away cleanly.
There was a fairly good demonstration of this on a recent "Hairy Bakers" programme, "Pies" was the episode I think.
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Postby wheels » Sat Sep 27, 2008 2:26 pm

Thanks Spuddy

I'm going to seal it I think - at the moment the bare wood seems to stick to the paste even with liberal use of flour.

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