Scandinavian style cured herrings - salting

Scandinavian style cured herrings - salting

Postby kevster » Thu Aug 12, 2010 12:48 pm

Hi all
I love genuine scandinavian-style cured herrings....in my opinion they are far better than the rollmop style herrings, which are too vinegary for me. The nearest equivalent I can find here is the sweet-cure herrings...although they still don't seem to be quite the same. There seems to be plenty of recipes online, but they all start with salted herring. Does anyone know how to prepare salted herring ready for pickling...and which of the many slightly varied methods should I then use for the most authentic scandinavian style pickling?
Many thanks
Kev
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Postby Richierich » Thu Aug 12, 2010 2:51 pm

Do you live near an Ikea? They sell them there, as good as anything I have had over there, nice with a bit of rye bread and a salad.
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Postby kevster » Thu Aug 12, 2010 3:42 pm

Not close to an Ikea, but we do get some Inlagd sill on the occassions we are passing one. I was hoping to make my own though and experiment with different sauces and spices.....especially if catch a few when I'm out fishing next.
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Postby grisell » Thu Aug 12, 2010 4:31 pm

I guess you'll just have to find salted herring if you want to be able to make the genuine stuff. Since I'm a Swedish cook, pickled herring is second nature to me.

I don't think you can salt the herring yourself, but I'll look into it and get back.
André

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Postby kevster » Fri Aug 13, 2010 5:33 am

grisell wrote:I guess you'll just have to find salted herring if you want to be able to make the genuine stuff. Since I'm a Swedish cook, pickled herring is second nature to me.

I don't think you can salt the herring yourself, but I'll look into it and get back.

That would be great if you could. Salted herring isn't easy to come by here, and I'm not keen on smoked or cooked herring....so they are wasted on me when I catch them...and I do love the sweet and creamy texture of Inlagd Sill
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Postby grisell » Fri Aug 13, 2010 6:13 am

I've checked it. It's very easy.

Remove and discard the heads and entrails, but leave the roe and milt (soft roe). Layer the fish with coarse salt and put a weight on top. Store cold. Ready after three weeks. For 5 kgs/11 lbs of herring use 1½ kg/3 lbs salt. Will keep for up to a year if stored cold.

Remove that you have to soak the herring before use; 6-24 hours depending on personal taste.

Good luck and please return if you want recipes! I have a load of them.

PS If you go fishing and get small catches from time to time, I don't see why you couldn't have a barrel that you constantly fill up with new fish and salt. Sounds practical to me.
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Postby kevster » Fri Aug 13, 2010 9:17 pm

grisell wrote:I've checked it. It's very easy.

Remove and discard the heads and entrails, but leave the roe and milt (soft roe). Layer the fish with coarse salt and put a weight on top. Store cold. Ready after three weeks. For 5 kgs/11 lbs of herring use 1½ kg/3 lbs salt. Will keep for up to a year if stored cold.

Remove that you have to soak the herring before use; 6-24 hours depending on personal taste.

Good luck and please return if you want recipes! I have a load of them.

PS If you go fishing and get small catches from time to time, I don't see why you couldn't have a barrel that you constantly fill up with new fish and salt. Sounds practical to me.


Perfect. As you say, I can imagine a traditional fisherman catching herring each day and adding them to the salting barrel...and then removing them a few at a time for rinsing and using. I'd love some recipes once I have some cured 8)
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Postby tiffanys » Mon Oct 18, 2010 7:49 am

I don't see why you couldn't have a barrel that you constantly fill up with new fish and salt. Sounds practical to me.
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