My First Salmon!!!!!!

Postby Oddley » Tue Dec 14, 2010 8:48 pm

Yes, well done Cath.

One small point, when trying to display an image on the forum. You have to put the image tags before and after each image. As below.

[img]http://img686.imageshack.us/img686/5242/024vz.jpg[/img]


Then it will display on the forum.

    Image


Your images in the raw state are on the large size. The image above is 400 pixels wide, this can be easily accomplished with the free program PIXresizer. At the link below.


http://bluefive.pair.com/pixresizer.htm
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Postby cath61 » Tue Dec 14, 2010 9:16 pm

Thanks Oddley! :)

Very new to all this and all advice gratefully received!
Enjoying the salmon though :)
Kids have just sat and polished off what was left from the weekend - Think that means it was a hit :D

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Postby Oddley » Tue Dec 14, 2010 9:29 pm

Cath, the current advice from the FSA is to freeze the salmon before curing, if it is not being cooked. The reason for this is, there are nematodes that infest some fish which can harm humans. Did you freeze your fish.

http://www.robedwards.com/2007/10/salmon-infected.html
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Postby grisell » Sat Dec 18, 2010 2:44 pm

The risk with parasites in farmed salmon is minimal (that was a farmed salmon, right?), so I think you will be safe. I've eaten hundreds of gravlax's in my life (it's staple food in Sweden) and never gotten any parasites (that I know of :? ). Neither have I heard of anyone who got it. The article refers to wild salmon.

That said, I can of course not guarantee anything.
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Postby saucisson » Sat Dec 18, 2010 5:46 pm

We don't know whether it was farmed or not so it was a timely heads up from Oddley. It was certainly something I had forgotten about.. :D
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Postby cath61 » Tue Dec 21, 2010 6:44 pm

Sorry for the late reply :oops:

I think it was farmed salmon though can't be sure. I will definately freeze next time, however "touch wood" we have all been ok so far.

Glad that Oddley made the point as would hate for somebody else to get ill because of something I had done .

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Postby Ryan C » Tue Dec 21, 2010 7:34 pm

Don't worry Cath, your salmon was almost certainly farmed and as such the risk is practically zero. You would be able to tell by the price if it was wild and the fishmonger/packaging would almost certainly shout about it if it was wild. Wild salmon are crazy expensive. Unfortunately, they are very rare in scotland nowadays, not really through overfishing as most people seem to think, but instead because of hydro-electric power plants damming up all the rivers which stop the salmon reaching their spawning grounds :( :( .

Keep up the curing and the great work at Francos

All the best

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Postby grisell » Tue Dec 21, 2010 10:01 pm

Looking now at your pictures, I clearly see that it is farmed. Farmed salmon is intensely pink from its monotonous diet of shellfish. Wild salmon is much brighter and can be even white in the flesh.
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Postby Oddley » Tue Dec 21, 2010 10:03 pm

I did some more research and found that wild stocks of herring have about a 30% occurrence of the worm. That really mucks up my soused herring I was going to do Christmas day, I haven't the time now to freeze them... :roll:
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Postby wheels » Tue Dec 21, 2010 10:42 pm

I'm sure I recall someone saying that the EHO had told them that it applies to Farmed Salmon as well? (WW?).

The inference from the following is that Farmed salmon currently has to be frozen (by law) but that the EFSA don't think that it is necessary and that the law will be changed:

http://www.reading.ac.uk/foodlaw/news/eu-10071.htm

I don't think that I'll bother freezing it in future.

Not that this helps you with your herring Oddley.

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Postby grisell » Tue Dec 21, 2010 11:13 pm

Oddley wrote:I did some more research and found that wild stocks of herring have about a 30% occurrence of the worm. That really mucks up my soused herring I was going to do Christmas day, I haven't the time now to freeze them... :roll:


What is 'soused herring'?
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Postby wheels » Tue Dec 21, 2010 11:23 pm

It's a type of pickled herring. Made with vinegar, water, spices, onions etc.

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Postby grisell » Tue Dec 21, 2010 11:35 pm

If that were dangerous, there would be no Swedes left on this planet. Pickled herring is eaten en masse by (my guess) well over half of the population and not only at Christmas. I have never heard of any regulations or recommendations about herring from the Swedish FDA, except for the risk with Botulism concerning pickled fresh (as opposed to salted) herring.
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Postby grisell » Tue Dec 21, 2010 11:36 pm

Oddley, you are using salted herring in the pickle, right?
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Postby Oddley » Tue Dec 21, 2010 11:44 pm

No fresh. Salted herring is not available in my area.

http://www.foodbase.org.uk/admintools/r ... isakis.pdf


The overall prevalence (percentage of total fish sampled found to be infected by worms) and abundance (mean number of worms per fish including both infected and uninfected fish) of A. simplex and P. decipiens in monkfish were 26.7% and 0.5, and 36% and 0.7, respectively, and in cod 50.3% and 3.3, and 37.9% and 2.5, respectively. In herring the overall prevalence and abundance of A. simplex were 36% and 0.7 and in mackerel 22.9% and 0.9, respectively.
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