Chinese Sausage(Lop Chong,Lop Cheong)

Recipes for all sausages

Chinese Sausage(Lop Chong,Lop Cheong)

Postby eddy current » Sat Nov 15, 2008 3:33 pm

Has any one any recipes for chinese sausage? have done search through forum but came up with zilch.
My new daughter-in-law is Chinese(with poor English) and is going to make Chinese sausages for Chinese New Year.
Unfortunately her recipes are in Chinese which she can't put into English yet! Kind of worried about ingredients regarding spices,herbs,saltpetre,etc.
Apart from that I'd like to have a go, see if I can impress her!!!

Bob
There are things known and things unknown and in between are the doors.
If the doors of perception were cleansed everything would appear to man as it is, infinite.
eddy current
Registered Member
 
Posts: 57
Joined: Wed Aug 23, 2006 1:17 pm
Location: S.W. Cumbria

Postby Oddley » Sat Nov 15, 2008 6:01 pm

Here's Two.


CHINESE SAUSAGES (LOP CHONG) Recipe #1

Ingredients:
5 lbs lean pork butt
3/4 lb pork fat
5 T sugar
1/4 cup thin soy sauce
1/4 cup chinese rice wine
1 tsp prague powder #2
1 tsp white pepper
2 tsp five spice powder

Method:
Grind the pork using the coarse disc two times. Add the cubed fat through the second grind. Combine the dry ingredients in a bowl and mix. Add to the meat and incorporate all ingredients well. Blend in the liquids. Refrigerate 24 hours. Stuff 28mm casings with the meat mixture, using the sausage stuffing attachment for your meat grinder. Pre-heat smoker to 160 F and smoke the sausage until an internal temperature of 140 F is reached. Allow to dry at room temperature or hang in a cool place until they shrink to 70% moisture compared to original weight.


Chinese Sausage - (Lop Cheong) Recipe #2

Ingredients:
2 1/4 lb pork butt
3/4 lb pork back fat
3 tbl brown sugar - (packed)
2 tsp salt
2 tbl soy sauce
1 tbl sweet sherry
3 tbl Scotch whiskey
1 tsp Chinese five-spice powder
2 tbl water
Hog casings

Method :
Grind the pork and fat in a meat grinder fitted with a 3/8-inch plate or, to be more authentic, dice the meat and fat with a knife into 1/4-inch cubes. Combine all the remaining ingredients except the casings in a large mixing bowl. Add the meat and fat and mix well.
Stuff the meat mixture into the hog casing; tie the casing into 5-inch links. Prick the links all over with a fork. Spread them on a rack and place them in the refrigerator. Let the sausages dry overnight.
Preheat the oven to 200 degrees. Place the sausages on a rack in a foil-lined baking sheet, making sure they do not touch each other. Bake for 5 hours. Shut off the oven but do not open the oven door. Let the sausages cool for another 2 hours. Discard any excess fat in the pan and store the sausages in the refrigerator for one to two weeks, or freeze them for two to three months.
This recipe yields 6 sausages, about 2 ounces each.
Comments: Small, slightly sweet and spicy Chinese sausages are used in many of the recipes in this collection. If you cannot get them, here is a recipe for making your own. It comes from San Francisco sausage maker Bruce Aidells, whose sausage making workshops are always a hit at my cooking school.
Yield: 6 sausages


I have not tried either, so if you do try them, let us know how they came out.
Being right, only comes from being wrong.
User avatar
Oddley
Registered Member
 
Posts: 2250
Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2004 10:58 pm
Location: Lost Dazed and Confused

Postby eddy current » Sat Nov 15, 2008 11:42 pm

Oddley,
Thanks for these recipes. Very similar to one I found through Google. It contains MSG though! and lots of sugar.

Meat selection Pork butt, 5 lbs, (2.3 kg), if using lean pork or lean pork trimmings add 30 % of pork backfat.
soy sauce 45 g 1/4 cup
sugar 100 g 7 Tbs
monosodium glutamate 6 g 1 tsp
cinnamon 2 g 1 tsp
ingredients
chinese rice wine 50 g 1/4 cup
water 250 mg 1 cup
Cure # 2 6 g 1 tsp
Method
Dicing or the tradititional Chinese way, still applied today, is a time consuming operation of cutting meat and fat by hand into small cubes.
Grinding Grind pork through the 3/8" (10 mm) plate. Mix mixture with Cure # 2 and let stand for 3 hours at 41�- 46� F (5�-8� C).
Mixing Add 1 cup cold water and mix everything well together with Cure # 2 and let stand for 3 hours at 41�- 46� F (5�-8� C . Water is added to facilitate mixing and stuffing.
Stuffing Stuff into narrow 18-24 mm sheep casings and make 5" - 6" long links.Tie both ends with a light butcher twine.Traditional Chinese method uses pieces of straw. Prick sausages on all sides with a needle to remove air and to facilitate water vapor escape during smoking.
Drying/smoking Dry applying light smoke for 48 hours at 122� F (50� C).
Drying Dry without smoke for 24 hours at 140� - 150� F (60� - 65� C). You should achieve about 40 % weight loss.
Cooking none
Ccooling Remove sausages from the smokehouse and hang in a well ventilated area for a few hours
Storing Hold in a dry room
Notes Popular Chinese wine is Mei Kwei Lo. The sausage color is dark reddish-brown. Its surface is normally shrivelled due to quick drying.

Any comments ,suggestions,etc. Rather dubious about the use of MSG and high sugar content.

Bob
There are things known and things unknown and in between are the doors.
If the doors of perception were cleansed everything would appear to man as it is, infinite.
eddy current
Registered Member
 
Posts: 57
Joined: Wed Aug 23, 2006 1:17 pm
Location: S.W. Cumbria

Thin soy sauce matters...

Postby krnntp » Wed Jan 20, 2010 7:02 pm

Hi, I'm glad to find these recipes here, as I'd love to have another go at lop cheong. I tried to make some last winter using a recipe from "Great Sausage Recipes and Meat Curing", and was very disappointed with the results. It looks like I might have had better luck if I had used light soy sauce instead of dark, as one of the recipes posted here calls for it explicitly.

FYI for anyone not into Chinese cooking, in Chinese terminology "light" or "thin" soy sauce is a salty, tangy flavorful sauce used most often to finish off a dish or in dipping sauces - a typical Japanese soy sauce like "Kikkoman" falls in this category. Dark soy is a lot darker, almost opaque black brown. It's used in general cooking, and to give stews and meats a rich reddish brown color. The taste is a little like blackstrap molasses, though it's thin in texture like light soy sauce. "Light" doesn't have anything to do with reduced sodium or dieting. :) "Pearl River Bridge" is a good brand from mainland China, and easy to find in Asian stores.

I was really pleased with the way my lop cheong looked - very gnarled and beautiful, with shapely cubes of fat, just like the ones in stores - but the taste was atrocious, I think b/c I used dark soy. It overwhelmed both the meat, and the garlic and 5 spice I added to jazz up the recipe. Also, Kutas recommends adding soy protein concentrate, for which I substituted skim milk powder, and that couldn't have helped matters.

Here's the recipe,

Great Sausage Recipes and Meat Curing, Rytek Kutas, 3rd edition, p229

"Chinese-Style Sausage" - 10 Lbs

3/4 cup dextrose / glucose
2 cups soy sauce (I should have used light soy sauce!)
2 cups Chinese white wine
(I wasn't sure whether to interpret this as light colored rice wine, or white spirits - shochu / vodka. I ended up going with shochu, for the alchohol content)
2 tsp Instacure (Prague powder) #1
1 1/2 cup soy protein concentrate
4 Tb corn syrup solids (I omitted)
6 Tb salt
6 1/2 Lb very lean pork - cut in 1/4 to 1/2 inch cubes
3 1/2 Lb backfat - cut in 1/4 to 1/2 inch cubes (I went with ~3/8 inch, centimeter size)

"Place fat cubes in hot boiling water for a few seconds using a sieve or screen. This prevents the cubes from sticking together. This is done just before adding the rest of the ingredients. Be sure you allow it to cool properly.

The lean pork is also cut up in cubes 1/4 to 1/2 inch; mix all ingredients with the pork, except the soy protein concentrate. Let stand for about 5 minutes. Then add backfat and soy protein concentrate and mix well. Let stand another 5 minutes before placing into stuffer. Use a 38 - 42 mm hog casing for stuffing into 5 or 6 inch links. The casings will have to be pin-pricked to insure proper drying. Place in smokehouse without smoke and let dry for 5-6 hrs at 120 F or until desired color is obtained. Remove to cooler overnight."


This sounded like a bland, bland recipe so I tried to enliven it by adding some 5 spice powder and garlic. It might have worked out, but for the dark soy and skim milk. BTW one thing I'm not fond of in the Kutas book are the requests for corn syrup solids, soy protein concentrate and "Fermento"; skim milk powder really doesn't seem much better.

I know that a whole range of different sausages are made and sold in China - I think I remember seeing "pork and liver"and "pork and duck" ones for sale here in the US. It would be great to find some of these other recipes -

I like the idea of letting the sausages hang for a day before heating them; perhaps this would allow a fuller flavor to develop.

PS. Bob, if you're still reading this thread, and your daughter in law really does have some family sausage recipes in Mandarin (or ?), do let me know, I'd love to have a go at translating them ...

Best - krnntp
User avatar
krnntp
Registered Member
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:14 pm
Location: USA

Postby Snags » Thu Jan 28, 2010 12:21 pm

The chinese white wine would probably be Rice Wine.
From the Lap chong I have seen and eaten they seem to be sweet as the predominant flavour

http://roseskitchen.wordpress.com/2007/ ... ap-cheong/

Lap cheong (chinese dried sausage)

These Chinese pork sausages look and feel like pepperoni, but they’re much sweeter. They include soy sauce, sugar, monosodium glutamate, and Chinese rice wine. Cassia is commonly added as a preservative.

This sausage may also be referred to as Lap Chung, Lap Chong, Lap Cheong, Lap Xuong, or Thuong Hang.
User avatar
Snags
Registered Member
 
Posts: 485
Joined: Mon Jan 25, 2010 11:53 am
Location: Discovery Coast

Postby Greyham » Sun Jan 31, 2010 11:12 am

The Chinese recipe posted on here Lap Cheong...was taken from this site http://home.pacbell.net/lpoli/index.htm
I have tried this recipe many times and it is very good. However, a very acquired taste..
Lastly they are much better if you do not smoke them
Really lastly.....i did change the recipe considerably and came up with a recipe using just a cure 1#. left for a week to ten days it made for a very interesting cooked product although i could not convince many of my customers apart from the obvious Chinese patrons
Greyham
BANNED
 
Posts: 191
Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2008 4:43 pm
Location: Bristol

Postby saucisson » Sun Jan 31, 2010 8:38 pm

Don't tease us then, what recipe did you come up with? :D
Curing is not an exact science... So it's not a sin to bin.

Great hams, from little acorns grow...
User avatar
saucisson
Site Admin
 
Posts: 6827
Joined: Sat Mar 04, 2006 8:46 pm
Location: Oxford UK

"white wine" in Chinese sausages

Postby krnntp » Fri Feb 12, 2010 9:47 pm

I checked the ingredients list of two of the Chinese style sausages sold at my local Chinese market, and it seems likely that the "white wine" or "rice wine" called for is probably white spirits, a sort of vodka-like high proof spirit distilled from rice wine.

The two brands I checked were Sun Ming Jan "Chinese Style Sausage", made in the USA, which lists gin as an ingredient; and Wing Wing brand "Chinese Style Sausage", made in Canada, which lists grain alchohol.

Gin, grain neutral spirits such as "Everclear", vodka, Michiu (Chinese white spirits), Shochu (the Japanese equivalent of Michiu) or Shoju (Korean Shochu) all ought to work here.

Best - krnntp
User avatar
krnntp
Registered Member
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:14 pm
Location: USA

Postby Zulululu » Sat Feb 13, 2010 8:03 am

Here is a tutorial check out the stuffer. http://unclephilipsg.blogspot.com/2009/ ... usage.html :D
No one knows more than all of us.
User avatar
Zulululu
Registered Member
 
Posts: 524
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2006 3:39 pm
Location: Zululand

Postby wheels » Sat Feb 13, 2010 1:42 pm

Great link - it seems that the 'real thing' is a lot simpler than we thought.

Phil
User avatar
wheels
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 12717
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 4:29 pm
Location: Leicestershire, UK

Postby Zulululu » Sun Feb 14, 2010 5:00 am

Another one that I found somewhere.
INGREDIENTS
Raw materials: (calculated for 10 kg batch)
60.00 % Lean pork meat (90/10) 6.000 kg
40.00 % Pork belly without skin (60/40) 4.000 kg
Extenders: ---
Additives:
(per kg raw materials) (total for 10 kg)
15.00 g Common salt (refined) 150.00 g
15.00 g Sugar (saccharose) 150.00 g
Seasonings:
(per kg raw materials) (total for 10 kg)
10.00 g Soy sauce 100.00 g (light)
2.00 g Rice wine 20.00 g
1.00 g Ginger, ground 10.00 g
0.50 g Cinnamon, ground 5.00 g


Smoking was given as 60 deg for 48 hrs which I imagine would be light smoke. I have never eaten one so can not tell.
No one knows more than all of us.
User avatar
Zulululu
Registered Member
 
Posts: 524
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2006 3:39 pm
Location: Zululand

Translated recipes

Postby krnntp » Mon Feb 15, 2010 8:21 pm

Hi, all!

I finally gave up and used my rudimentary Mandarin skills to search for recipes on the Chinese-speaking internet, with surprising success -

Google Translate has given me enough of the gist to get a general idea, but I'll need to translate more carefully and get the input of some native speakers before the recipes are "ready for prime time". Here are some of the highlights - sausage names and flavoring ingredients,

From a Taiwanese blogger,
Spicy Taiwan style sausage - soy sauce, brown sugar, roasted sichuan pepper, fresh chiles, paprika
Taiwan garlic sausage - sugar, cinnamon, garlic powder, 5 spice, white pepper
Taiwan style sausage - brown sugar, cinnamon, garlic powder

From MeiWeiGongZhuo, a Chinese recipe hub, a traditional recipe for Sichuan style spicy sausage - brown sugar, black cardamon, white pepper, sichuan pepper, cinnamon, clove, red rice powder (a natural red coloring).

From 163.vc, which looks like another Chinese media hub, recipes for
Sichuan style bacon
Zhengyang air-dried sausage - seasoned with black cardamon, pepper, ginger, soy
Cantonese sausage - sugar, light soy
Wuhan sausage - sugar, white pepper, ginger
Lioyuan Longshan sausage (Beijing area) - sheep casing, ginger and cinnamon / cloves / black cardamon steeped in wine
Taiyuan Liu Wei Zhai sausage - soy, Sichuan pepper, black cardamon, dill seed, and some other herbs
Rugao sausage - sugar, soy, glucose
Sausage "dates" (hard sausage balls with mild seasoning)

From gourmetgarden.com.my, a Malaysian / Singaporean chinese version of Lop Cheong made with rose flavored spirits (Mei Kuei Lu Chiew)

Best - krnntp
User avatar
krnntp
Registered Member
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:14 pm
Location: USA

Re: Chinese Sausage(Lop Chong,Lop Cheong)

Postby Thewitt » Fri Sep 13, 2013 11:29 am

I know this is an old thread, but I was talking to a butcher here in Penang who makes Chinese sausage.

No sulfite or sulfate.

No smoking.

Dice, mix, stuff, hang till dry....

Been dong it that way for 60 years.

I'll be helping him next week, so I'll post the recipe and anything else I can glean from his tutoring. He says we will be making 100 kilos....and shows me the space in the back of his shop where we will be hanging them. Not sure if we I'll really make 100 kilos, but the space looks large enough. I'm bringing my small piston stuffer with me...

I asked him if his recipe was a secret and he says, "Why secret? Every butcher know how to make lap cheong."
Thewitt
Registered Member
 
Posts: 114
Joined: Thu May 09, 2013 3:08 am
Location: Penang, Malaysia

Re: Chinese Sausage(Lop Chong,Lop Cheong)

Postby Mohalk » Fri Sep 13, 2013 11:50 am

Thewitt wrote:I know this is an old thread, but I was talking to a butcher here in Penang who makes Chinese sausage.

No sulfite or sulfate.

No smoking.

Dice, mix, stuff, hang till dry....

Been dong it that way for 60 years.

I'll be helping him next week, so I'll post the recipe and anything else I can glean from his tutoring. He says we will be making 100 kilos....and shows me the space in the back of his shop where we will be hanging them. Not sure if we I'll really make 100 kilos, but the space looks large enough. I'm bringing my small piston stuffer with me...

I asked him if his recipe was a secret and he says, "Why secret? Every butcher know how to make lap cheong."


Thanks much!

I'll be watching for this.

Al
Old school! Why? I'm old.
Mohalk
Registered Member
 
Posts: 49
Joined: Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:40 pm
Location: Largo, Florida USA

Re: Chinese Sausage(Lop Chong,Lop Cheong)

Postby wheels » Fri Sep 13, 2013 12:49 pm

Me too. My own impression of the Chinese sausage from the local Chinese supermarket is that it's a fairly plain sausage with little spice flavour. It'll be interesting to see what is used.

Phil
User avatar
wheels
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 12717
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 4:29 pm
Location: Leicestershire, UK

Next

Return to Sausage Recipes

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 2 guests

cron