White Hots (Rochester white hot dogs)

Recipes for all sausages

Postby SausageBoy » Sun Mar 04, 2012 4:20 pm

Yes, I sure wish it were easier to make a decent emulsions at home.
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Postby vagreys » Sun Mar 04, 2012 6:28 pm

Makes me wish I had a bowl chopper. The Scottish Rite temple has a little counter-top Buffalo chopper in their kitchen that would be perfect. Sigh.
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Postby SausageBoy » Sun Mar 04, 2012 6:33 pm

vagreys wrote:Makes me wish I had a bowl chopper. The Scottish Rite temple has a little counter-top Buffalo chopper in their kitchen that would be perfect. Sigh.


I have an $80,000 vacuum bowl chopper (what the super serious folks use) on my list in the unlikelihood I win the lottery. LOL
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Postby vagreys » Sun Mar 04, 2012 7:14 pm

Hah! The frustrating thing is that the texture is what it is, and very difficult to duplicate at home as part of the experience. Let's be clear, though - I like the fine texture I get by multiple passes through the 1/8" plate. In fact, I've decided that that is the technique I'm using for my take on a medieval Frankfurt Wurst.

There was a technique used in medieval Western Europe (I've found depictions in English, French and German) for mincing meat for farces (meat stuffing) and farcemeat (more like meatloaf, at the time), that involved the worker taking two large knives in hand, called gavinets, and using those to mince the meat to a fine texture. I imagine the fine mince I get isn't too far from what was possible mincing the devil out of a pile of meat with two, big, heavy, sharp knives.
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Postby wheels » Sun Mar 04, 2012 7:27 pm

I think that Chinese chefs often mince with two cleavers.

I find that my Magimix 5200 is OK for small quantities. I'd like to try a commercial food processor if I could get one for a reasonable price.

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Postby SausageBoy » Sun Mar 04, 2012 7:30 pm

Multiple passes through the 3mm plate is what I use too,

I was surprised to learn how long bowl choppers have been in use, the following is from the book Le livre des conserves circa 1900 France.

Image

:D
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Postby vagreys » Sun Mar 04, 2012 8:11 pm

Very cool!
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Postby Yannis » Mon Mar 05, 2012 11:13 am

I make emulsions with Bosch universal plus blender attachment

Image

Results are great and the only problem is that I make 150-200gr each run but it takes only 15-20 seconds. For a 2-3 kg batch it takes about 30 minutes as I have to open lid, empty emulsion with a large spoon, put new meat inside, close lid and start again. Besides being slow this technique gives texture like professional made emulsions.

Edit
I forgot to mention that using a Mulinex food processor (like Phil's Magimix) texture was far worst compared to blender.
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Postby wheels » Mon Mar 05, 2012 3:24 pm

Yannis

Are you saying that you use the blender/liquidiser jug attachment, 'cos I've got one of those on my Kenwood?

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Postby Yannis » Mon Mar 05, 2012 5:04 pm

Yes Phil, I use the blender jug and the resulting emulsion is about the same as professionals. This is my wife's idea when I couldn't get a fine emulsion with food processor. Give it a try but don't put a lot of meat in the jug because it emulsifies the lower part and the upper part stays on top. For my blender I put about 1/5 to 1/4 of height adding some ice cold water.
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Postby wheels » Mon Mar 05, 2012 5:13 pm

Thanks Yannis.

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Postby SausageBoy » Tue Mar 06, 2012 2:42 am

I picked up a package of Zweigle’s Whites with natural casing tonight because it's been so long since I've had them (back in the 80's) that I could not remember exactly what they tasted like.

They are tasty, but the seasoning is so mild that it's difficult to pick out exactly what the spices are.

This is going to sound real weird, but the seasoning tastes to me like what's traditional used to flavor gefilte fish.....which is mild onion and white pepper!!!

If there's mustard or mace/nutmeg in there it's certainly a tiny amount!!!

:D
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Postby Dogfish » Tue Mar 06, 2012 11:25 pm

Just a thought, because I really have no clue at all when it comes to meat, but what if you cooked the fat beforehand? Like simmered it in seasoned water, cooled it, removed the liquid, and then emulsified the rendered fat and fat chunks into a sort of whip before mixing in the well ground meat. Then, emulsify the whole batch. That way the fats may be more available.

I'm thinking of a sort of meat "mayonnaise" where fat is mixed with protein at a slow and regular rate, at a slow speed of mix, partially stabilized by the presence of some acidity, which is probably unnecessary because of the myosin. Or maybe I'm thinking of a protein rest in brewing. Not sure. But something along the same lines. All I know when making mayo is that slow mixing does the job and fast mixing doesn't.
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Postby SausageBoy » Fri Mar 09, 2012 7:16 pm

I tasted the Zweigle's whites a couple more times.
I'm convinced that there's also coriander in there.

I snapped a pic.....

Image


:D
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Postby vagreys » Fri Mar 09, 2012 7:50 pm

Sounds like a little frankfurter influence. Coriander is so good with pork!
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