L-Cysteine Hydrochloride (E920)

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L-Cysteine Hydrochloride (E920)

Postby Ader1 » Sun Sep 30, 2012 7:37 pm

Does anybody know where I can get hold of some of this stuff ie L-Cysteine Hydrochloride (E920)? I know bakers do use it but I cannot find it. Any suggestions? This is what it does:

http://www.bakeryinfo.co.uk/news/archiv ... clean.html

"This relaxes the gluten network to make the dough much more extensible, with less shrink-back and better pan flow and volume control. It is for use in making regular shapes such as hamburger buns with an indent, pizzas or flatbreads with a certain shape and reworking pastry off-cuts. It is cost-effective because only a tiny amount is needed in a bread improver."

Thanks
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Postby wheels » Sun Sep 30, 2012 7:49 pm

Hi

You don't say where in the world you are - I'm guessing by the .co.uk link that it's the UK?

If so, you can buy 'dough relaxer' here:

http://www.claybrookewatermill.co.uk/conditioners.html

I'm guessing it's the stuff you want - if not, it does the same thing.

For commercial amounts:

http://www.gb-plange.co.uk/products-bra ... -relaxers/

HTH

Phil
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Postby Ader1 » Sun Sep 30, 2012 8:08 pm

Yes, I'm in the UK. Thanks for those links. I wonder what the 'dough relaxer' is....? I've read up about L-Cysteine Hydrochloride (E920) and it seems to have the exact effect on dough which I'm looking for ie at some point if too much is added then the dough will become almost like chewing gum.
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Postby wheels » Sun Sep 30, 2012 10:36 pm

Perhaps telephone Claybrooke Mill on 01455 202 443 and ask them to read out the ingredients of the Dough relaxer to you?

Phil
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Postby RodinBangkok » Mon Oct 01, 2012 10:37 am

I think your better off using the age old techniques such as autolyse for relaxing dough. In high volume very cost efficient bakeries the use of dough relaxers is justified based on in process time saved in making high volume bread. The same results can be obtained simply by using existing process techniques such as autolyse for relaxing dough. Why add these things when its really not necessary?
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Postby Ader1 » Tue Oct 02, 2012 10:28 am

Thank you both for your suggestions.
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Postby Ader1 » Fri Oct 12, 2012 12:31 pm

wheels wrote:Perhaps telephone Claybrooke Mill on 01455 202 443 and ask them to read out the ingredients of the Dough relaxer to you?

Phil


I did telephone them and they no longer do the dough relaxer according to the lady I spoke to. I did contact a Wacker Chemicals which were based in Germany and gave me the contact of IMCD which is a UK distributor. The guy there asked me about whether my enquiry was a commercial enquiry as 'L cysteine is packed in 25kg packs'. I wrote back to him but I obviously didn't tick the boxes for him to bother wasting his time with and I've not heard anything from him since although I did ask him subsequently what the price of a 25Kg pack and if he knew of where I could get it in smaller quantities. It's seems it's rather difficult to get this stuff.
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