Die Fabrikation feiner Fleisch- und Wurstwaren

Die Fabrikation feiner Fleisch- und Wurstwaren

Postby vagreys » Fri Dec 28, 2012 10:20 pm

I am SO excited! I just used some Christmas money to buy myself a 4th edition copy of Die Fabrikation feiner Fleisch- und Wurstwaren by Fleischmeister Hermann Koch. This is probably the most comprehensive collection of German meat and sausage recipes out there. The current edition contains over 1200 recipes and variations. The version I got is pre-Depression, pre-Nazi, pre-WWII. I'm not sure, but it may also be pre-WWI. It doesn't contain as many recipes as the more current editions, of course - it won't contain a recipe for currywurst, for instance - but what it does contain will be Old School. Pics to follow!
- tom

Don't tell me the odds.

You have the power to donate life
User avatar
vagreys
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1620
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 3:54 pm
Location: North Chesterfield VA USA

Re: Die Fabrikation feiner Fleisch- und Wurstwaren

Postby BriCan » Sat Dec 29, 2012 12:21 am

vagreys wrote: The version I got is pre-Depression, pre-Nazi, pre-WWII. I'm not sure, but it may also be pre-WWI. It doesn't contain as many recipes as the more current editions, of course - it won't contain a recipe for currywurst, for instance - but what it does contain will be Old School. Pics to follow!


The thing about getting the older copy is that you have original :?: recipes which in some cases maybe current but have been adjusted to modern day trends. Cannot wait to see photos if they are anything like that was in the old mans books, then they are worth their weight in gold :)
But what do I know
User avatar
BriCan
Registered Member
 
Posts: 2190
Joined: Wed Apr 07, 2010 12:07 am
Location: West Coast of Canada

Postby vagreys » Sat Dec 29, 2012 6:38 am

Pics of the title page:
Image
Yes, that looks like a tornado doodled on the title page. Apparently, above it, is the name of the owner from whose estate it was sold.
Image

And samples from the table of contents:
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
- tom

Don't tell me the odds.

You have the power to donate life
User avatar
vagreys
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1620
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 3:54 pm
Location: North Chesterfield VA USA

Postby NCPaul » Sat Dec 29, 2012 12:19 pm

Wow! Is there a particular sausage type you are researching or are you mainly focusing on the historical perspective? I'd love to see any recipes you work out.
Fashionably late will be stylishly hungry.
NCPaul
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2303
Joined: Thu Oct 01, 2009 12:58 am
Location: North Carolina

Postby vagreys » Sun Dec 30, 2012 12:15 am

Trying to find non-Americanized German sausage recipes that weren't altered as a result of Nazi politics, WWII's thorough destruction of Germany, the subsequent isolation of East Germany, and Communist politics. I wanted a comprehensive source that would provide regional variations on common sausages, as well as some of the uncommon ones. For myself, I'm looking primarily at pork sausages, since I can't eat beef, but there may be some that are just too tempting to pass up, and I may be subbing bison for beef. From there, I can work out substitutions.

ETA: I'll be sharing recipes, of course.
- tom

Don't tell me the odds.

You have the power to donate life
User avatar
vagreys
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1620
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 3:54 pm
Location: North Chesterfield VA USA

Postby DiggingDogFarm » Sun Dec 30, 2012 2:31 am

That is awesome!!!!!

Any clue about sausages in the Palatinate up to about 1733?
My maternal grandmother's family came from the Palatinate in 1733 aboard an Irish ship and settled in Northern New Jersey.
I've always been curious about sausages from that area at that time but have never been able to find much information.
Saumagen AKA Hog Maw or stuffed pig's stomach seems to be the signature dish from the area.
FWIW, many Amish and Mennonites came from the Palatinate region.


~Martin
User avatar
DiggingDogFarm
Registered Member
 
Posts: 446
Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 5:38 am
Location: Finger Lakes Region of New York State

Postby vagreys » Sun Dec 30, 2012 8:43 pm

Most of my study (and source material) is from much earlier than that, or modern. I haven't spent much time on 18th C. foods. I'm sure there is some documentation, but it would likely be in housebooks. Traditions in the butchers' guilds of the 18th C were primarily taught as oral tradition and by demonstration. Written formulas were few and closely held.
- tom

Don't tell me the odds.

You have the power to donate life
User avatar
vagreys
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1620
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 3:54 pm
Location: North Chesterfield VA USA

Re: Die Fabrikation feiner Fleisch- und Wurstwaren

Postby JerBear » Tue Feb 12, 2013 9:36 pm

Just what I needed, another rare specialty cookbook I feel I must have!

My wife is not amused.
User avatar
JerBear
Registered Member
 
Posts: 421
Joined: Sun Oct 17, 2004 9:32 pm
Location: San Diego, CA, USA

Re: Die Fabrikation feiner Fleisch- und Wurstwaren

Postby vagreys » Tue Feb 12, 2013 11:08 pm

A friend of mine is repairing the spine leather. His specialty turns out to be bookbinding and book repair.
- tom

Don't tell me the odds.

You have the power to donate life
User avatar
vagreys
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1620
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 3:54 pm
Location: North Chesterfield VA USA

Re: Die Fabrikation feiner Fleisch- und Wurstwaren

Postby JerBear » Tue Feb 12, 2013 11:17 pm

A little internet sleuthing turned up a 5th edition copy for sale with an estimated publish date of 1910-1919 for $75 USD. Looks to be a steal but I don't have the cash to spend right now so I'll cross my fingers for another copy to become available down the road. Looks like an awesome title, I'd love to see more pics!
User avatar
JerBear
Registered Member
 
Posts: 421
Joined: Sun Oct 17, 2004 9:32 pm
Location: San Diego, CA, USA

Re: Die Fabrikation feiner Fleisch- und Wurstwaren

Postby vagreys » Fri Feb 22, 2013 4:50 am

Mark did a great job on preserving the spine leather, reinforcing the spine, and securing the spine leather to the bolstered spine. The book is back to usable form without having to worry about it falling apart. He did it for free, for the opportunity to practice restoration on a book that old. I couldn't be more pleased or grateful.
- tom

Don't tell me the odds.

You have the power to donate life
User avatar
vagreys
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1620
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 3:54 pm
Location: North Chesterfield VA USA

Re: Die Fabrikation feiner Fleisch- und Wurstwaren

Postby JerBear » Fri Feb 22, 2013 6:10 am

Care to post some before and after pics?
User avatar
JerBear
Registered Member
 
Posts: 421
Joined: Sun Oct 17, 2004 9:32 pm
Location: San Diego, CA, USA

Re: Die Fabrikation feiner Fleisch- und Wurstwaren

Postby Laripu » Wed Sep 18, 2013 5:02 pm

I know I'm bumping an old thread with some information that you may already have, but...

I got to this web-site (http://www.uni-giessen.de/gloning/tx/sawe.htm) by looking up the name "Sabina Welserin" that was attached to an old recipe someone posted on one of these threads. Apparently it's from 1553, so that's definitely pre-whatever. :wink: :lol:

It's in "frühneuhochdeutschen" which I believe means early new high German. The challenges in reading this are that the spellings are not modern (e.g. wirst used instead of wurst) and often not consistent (prattwirst and brattwirst in the same recipe, both wirst and wúrst.used).

My wife, who's first language is German, read a bit and then stopped in disgust. The difficulties are even worse for English speakers. I speak a little German so I understood some of it, but I like European languages and I'm pretty persistent.

On the other hand... it's free. :)
Dort wo man Bücher verbrennt, verbrennt man auch am Ende Menschen. - Heinrich Heine.
User avatar
Laripu
Registered Member
 
Posts: 116
Joined: Tue Sep 03, 2013 4:19 pm
Location: Tampa, Florida, USA

Re: Die Fabrikation feiner Fleisch- und Wurstwaren

Postby vagreys » Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:17 am

In my thread on medieval German sausage recipes, I've included the Sabina Welserin bratwurst recipe. Incidentally, it has become a customer favorite. I offer it as all-pork, 80/20 pork and bacon, and 40/40/20 pork/bison/bacon. The seasonings are salt, pepper, marjoram and sage. It's a great recipe. The Welserin manuscript is one of the most accessible German manuscripts from the Renaissance, and easier to deal with than some of the others, if that tells you anything.
- tom

Don't tell me the odds.

You have the power to donate life
User avatar
vagreys
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1620
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 3:54 pm
Location: North Chesterfield VA USA

Re: Die Fabrikation feiner Fleisch- und Wurstwaren

Postby vagreys » Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:24 am

I just saw the request for before and after pics of the spine restoration. Unfortunately, I wasn't thinking about documenting the process, so I didn't have 'before' pics, which kind of renders 'after' pics less meaningful. There was actually very little leather lost over time, so the spine looks almost as if there had been no deterioration. A German lady, here in BC, has offered to help with some translation, and I will post as I can. I intend to take advantage of her offer for the two remaining months of my visit, and have had the book shipped from home. As some of you know, by now, I usually have a lot of irons in the fire at any given time.
- tom

Don't tell me the odds.

You have the power to donate life
User avatar
vagreys
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1620
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 3:54 pm
Location: North Chesterfield VA USA

Next

Return to Books,videos,manuals etc.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron