Wheels Soft Rolls

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Wheels Soft Rolls

Postby Abrwstr » Sat Aug 07, 2010 3:48 pm

I've heard a lot about Phils soft rolls and really want to try them, but can't find the recipe,
a link would be much appreciated

Thanks, T.B.
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Postby johnfb » Sat Aug 07, 2010 4:10 pm

Here ya go...this is from Phil's blog...great reading here by the way...add it to your favs

http://www.localfoodheroes.co.uk/weblog ... =my_weblog



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Postby Richierich » Sun Aug 08, 2010 7:11 am

They are very good indeed! :D
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Postby Mike D » Sun Aug 08, 2010 8:58 am

I daren't do anything else now! :oops:
Cheers,


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Postby Abrwstr » Sat Aug 14, 2010 3:31 pm

Thanks everyone I will definitely give them a try.

T.B.
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Postby lemonD » Sat Aug 14, 2010 7:14 pm

Abrwstr wrote:Thanks everyone I will definitely give them a try.

T.B.

You won't be disappointed :D
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Postby fatgit » Fri Aug 27, 2010 3:16 pm

Big thumbs up from me!

I recently went back to home bread making after a long absence, and owning a bread maker that basically made bricks resembling a loaf, but recently bought a mixer that has dough hooks, and saw posts recommending Wheels soft rolls, so thought I'd give em a try.
I'm so glad I did too! They are by far the best soft rolls I have ever made, even though an accident with a bag of Strong flour meant I had to use half strong, half plain, and the dozen I made 2 days ago are but a memory, and another batch are proving right now.

I gave the brick maker away on Freegle yesterday too, as there's so little actual work involved now we have the mixer, probably about 10mins actual hands on, the rest is letting the mixer, nature and the oven do their work.

Now, if anyone has a recipe this good for a nice crusty cob......
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Postby wheels » Fri Aug 27, 2010 3:50 pm

Not a recipe as such, but up the cooking temp of the soft rolls to 220°C and put a baking tray in the oven whilst the oven heats. When you put the rolls in, pour a glass of water into the baking tray (on the shelf underneath the rolls) to create steam. Remove the tray of water half-way through cooking.

These won't be a 'true' crusty roll - they have too much fat for that - but they're nearly there.

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Postby johnfb » Sat Aug 28, 2010 2:47 pm

I remember asking you about this before, Phil. I tried this method but it just made a mess of your fab soft rolls. I feel they shouldn't be touched and if crusty rolls are required use a normal bread recipe and make into rolls with the steam.


john


PS
When I say "mess" I don't mean anything was wrong with them...just that these rolls are the business and should be left as is...IMHO
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Postby wheels » Sat Aug 28, 2010 4:45 pm

Nice of you to say so John.

You could always make double and have one soft and one (semi) crusty! :lol:

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Postby johnfb » Sun Aug 29, 2010 7:27 pm

Nah...if I was making double amounts I would keep them ALL as the soft rolls...you just can't mess with perfection.

MAKE BLOODY NORMAL BREAD AND MAKE THAT CRUSTY...LEAVE THE SOFT ROLLS ALONE !!!!!! :wink:
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Postby wheels » Sun Aug 29, 2010 7:56 pm

OK. I heard you - no need to shout! :lol: :lol:
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Postby johnfb » Mon Aug 30, 2010 5:57 pm

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
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crusty rolls

Postby steelchef » Tue Sep 14, 2010 6:28 am

Moderators?

Come on girls! This is bread; not sausage.
In any case my soft roll recipe is better.

Refrigerator Dough For Quick Soft Rolls

Throw refrigerator dough together in the morning or evening, or whenever you have a few spare moments. The small amount of yeast allows the dough to keep in the fridge for up to 5 days without developing a "sour" taste.

4 cups (17 ounces) All-Purpose Flour
2 tablespoons (1 ounce) sugar*
2 teaspoons salt
1/4 cup (2 ounces, 1/2 stick) unsalted butter
6 tablespoons (2 1/4 ounces) potato flour
6 tablespoons (2 ounces) non-fat dry milk
1 1/2 cups (12 ounces) water
1 teaspoon instant yeast

*Use up to 4 tablespoons sugar if you like your rolls on the sweet side.

Manual /Mixer Method: Combine all of the ingredients and mix till cohesive. Knead the dough, by hand or mixer, till it's smooth, about 5 to 10 minutes, adding up to 4 tablespoons additional water if needed. The dough will become shiny and elastic, but should stay very soft, since it firms up quite a bit in the refrigerator. Place the kneaded dough in a greased bowl, cover it, and refrigerate at least overnight, or for up to 5 days.

Shaping: Remove the dough from the refrigerator, fold it over gently a few times, and cut off the desired amount for the number of rolls you want. You'll need about 1 1/2 to 2 ounces dough per dinner roll (golf-ball sized pieces); about 4 1/2 ounces per hamburger bun (a ball of dough about 2 1/2 inches in diameter); or 3 ounces per hotdog bun (about 2 1/4 inches in diameter). Return the remaining dough to the refrigerator.

To form dinner rolls, shape the pieces into balls, then roll them under your lightly cupped fingers on an un-floured work surface to make smooth balls. To form hamburger buns, shape each piece into a smooth ball, and flatten the balls till they're about 4 inches in diameter, trying to keep the tops of the rolls smooth; the nicer the top looks at this point, the nicer it will turn out to be once it's baked. To form hotdog buns, roll the balls into cylinders 5 1/2 inches in length. Flatten the cylinders slightly; dough rises more in the center, so this will give the buns gently rounded tops.

Place the shaped rolls onto a greased or parchment-lined baking sheet, cover them, and let them rise for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, until they're very puffy. Note that these rolls need to rise longer than rolls made from unrefrigerated dough; be sure to leave yourself sufficient time for this extra rise.

Baking: Bake the dinner rolls in a preheated 375°F oven for 15 to 18 minutes. Bake the hamburger or hotdog buns in a preheated 350°F oven for 20 to 22 minutes. The rolls or buns will be golden brown when done. Yield: 36 ounces of dough, enough for 18 to 24 rolls, 8 hamburger buns, or 12 hotdog buns.
Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites. Moderation is for monks.
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Re: crusty rolls

Postby wheels » Tue Sep 14, 2010 3:31 pm

steelchef wrote:Moderators?

Come on girls! This is bread; not sausage.
In any case my soft roll recipe is better.


There's a certain irony here in that my recipe was an attempt to make a horrible soft supermarket type roll, probably one of the worst breads known to man! It's success has haunted me, but now I will be less embarrassed knowing that someone has exceeded my mediocrity! :wink: :lol: :lol:

Seriously though, that looks like a nice recipe, what's the reason for the potato flour? Is potato starch (fecule) the same thing?

Just out of interest, what's this thing with bread from your side of the pond, it all seems to be so sweet? Is it just specific types of bread, or is it like that in general?

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